Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 28

Thread: Dust Bin Sensor Completed

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,248

    Dust Bin Sensor Completed

    After reading all of the fine work by several members, I decided that I wanted to add the dust bin sensor to my Oneida Super Dust Gorilla. I ordered most of the parts on eBay. The sensor was $3.79, the delay relay board was $4.95 and the 12 V power supply was $9.99. I used some LED trailer lights that I had sitting around, a blue electrical box and wire and a terminal strip. The picture shows the sensor, delay board and washers I used for mounting the sensor.


    20190315_111215 (Medium).jpg

    My dust collector is outside of my shop in the garage so I need to wire it with the sensor in the garage and the rest of the circuit and lights in my shop. I drilled a hole thru the wall and mounted Ύ” plywood on either side.

    20190315_111537 (Medium).jpg
    This is an overview of my cyclone. I am using a cardboard bin with a metal lid to collect the chips. A hole drill was used to drill thru the lid and the sensor mounted using hose washers on each side to seal the sensor. Before mounting the sensor, it was calibrated so that it picked up anything within about 4 inches of it. I mounted an electrical box close so that I had enough wire to the sensor to easily remove the lid and empty the bin. Note that the metal lid is grounded to the metal cyclone.

    20190310_111033 (Medium).jpg
    Inside my shop, I mounted the circuit board in an electrical box and made all the connections to the sensor, power, and the alarm lights.

    20190310_110305 (Medium).jpg
    I mounted the 2 12 volt trailer lights near the ceiling from one of my 6” pipes. It is a place where I would see it if it was turned on. In the future, I will look at getting a flasher relay to use to make the lights blink. The relays are cheap and the same thing that is used in a car for flashing lights.

    20190310_110444 (Medium).jpg
    My thanks to Rod Sheridan for his help in wiring the sensor, power and circuit board as I would have never figured it out myself.
    Last edited by Larry Frank; 03-17-2019 at 12:50 PM.

  2. #2
    So, have you used it enough to know if it works? I bought one of the first ones Oneida sold, and it would work about 1 out of 3 bin fulls. Threw it away.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,569
    Larry, that looks like it turned out really great! If you feel so inclined, please post more details about the specific parts you used and a wiring diagram and I'll get this into the sticky thread setup up above so folks can benefit from it going forward. I suspect there will be good interest...including myself having just had to clean out my filter (a thankless task) after over filling last week while milling a bunch of soft maple.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    262
    Looks good Larry. I have all the parts rounded up but am a ways out on building mine.
    Regards,

    Kris

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    4,998
    Nice job Larry!

    I agree a parts list would be very helpful. Any chance of a video to see it in action?

    I will need one of these in the future.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,248
    Here is the information on the two main parts which I purchased on Ebay. The price was very low but took awhile to get to me.

    Here is the sensor - E3F-DS30C4 Diffuse Reflection Type IR Adjustable Photoelectric Switch

    Bin Sensor Ebay 2.jpg

    And Here is the delay relay board- DC 12V 24V Digital Led Infinite Cycle Delay Timer Switch ON/OFF Relay Module.
    Delay Relay Ebay.jpg

    The other parts were just a 12V DC power brick, a couple of LED trailer lights, and misc parts for the wire, and boxes.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,569
    Thanks, Larry...I've made this thread a sticky for folks to easily get the information into the future. This is an incredibly useful accommodation for anyone with a cyclone, even if it's in the same room with them, but especially for all of us who have our units located "out of sight" while working.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,349
    Larry, glad to hear you have it running.

    Here's the drawing for it. I set the timer at 10 seconds so it would ignore those occasional false alarms caused by swirling dust in the bin.

    I used a 5 ampere supply because I used a 12 volt LED beacon for a vehicle which is mounted on the ceiling in my shop. Even I can't ignore it

    NPN Drawing.jpginstalled Sensor.jpg12 Volt Beacon.jpg

    Regards, Rod.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,569
    Thanks for the diagram, Rod. Much appreciated!

    I ordered the parts a few minutes ago. The timer board will take awhile as "all three" vendors (which I suspect is really only one vendor) are currently "on vacation" but the sensor and power supply are readily available.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 03-21-2019 at 9:47 AM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,349
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Thanks for the diagram, Rod. Much appreciated!

    I ordered the parts a few minutes ago. The timer board will take awhile as "all three" vendors (which I suspect is really only one vendor) are currently "on vacation" but the sensor and power supply are readily available.
    You're welcome Jim, have fun....................Rod.

  11. #11
    Nice!

    Thanks, Larry & Rod.



    BTW, I remember seeing a thread once where a guy built one of these but also added an audible buzzer.

    It should be pretty simple to add that, just find the right 12v buzzer to use, and make sure you have enough 12v current.
    Last edited by Allan Speers; 04-21-2019 at 12:23 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,569
    I have my parts now other than a light, so I just have to get on with building things when I have a "copious free moment". Alan, good suggestion on the buzzer.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,569
    Ok, I've physically assembled everything successfully nothing blew up once I applied power. The IR sensor seems to be sensing when I play with it. So...

    Larry, you mentioned calibration of the IR sensor. Perhaps I missed it, but how does one do that. Also what are your recommended settings for the circuit board. I downloaded the "how to set" material off the EBay listing, but will appreciate your thoughts on how best to arrange things based on your experience with the solution.

    Thanks in advance!

    ---
    I had a box lying about to put things in.

    IMG_4221.jpg IMG_4222.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    I ordered all the parts on Amazon, more expensive but seemed liked quicker delivery. The sensor was delivered today, other parts are on the way. It looks to pick up objects 5 inches away. You can adjust this by moving it along the threads but that will only give you 1 or 2 inches of play. Detecting objects 5 inches from the top of a barrel seems good to me.

    I am also confused by the settings on the circuit board. I am not sure which mode I need to only trigger the light when repetitive detection is encountered.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,349
    Hi Jim, to calibrate the sensor I adjusted the potentiometer so that the sensor wouldn't trigger until my hand was as close as possible to the sensor.

    Here are the instructions I wrote for programming the timer...........Regards, Rod.

    1) Apply power to the timer, display indicates “00”
    2) Press and hold “SET” button until it displays “P1”
    3) Press “SET” once to go to “P2” (On delay mode)
    4) Repeatedly press “ADD” key to go to “-1” (time range)
    5) Press “SET” once to go to “t1”
    6) Press “ADD” to go to “10” (Time setting in seconds). If you go too far press “ENTER/-“ to subtract from the setting.
    7) Press “SET”, the timer will now countdown to “00” and the red LED will illuminate and you will hear the relay click.
    8) Remove power from the timer, re-apply power and watch it count down and operate.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •