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Thread: Two foolish mistakes at table saw cost me, dearly - Graphic Photos!

  1. #46
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    I don't like the idea of pushing over the blade with a gripper. My father went over a few foundation rules when I started working with machinery as a teenager and one of them was not to push past a cutter. I do it occasionally for things where I'm certain my movement won't put me in contact.

    The gripper is neat and I use their jointer push block but the idea of going over a circular saw blade just seems like a bad plan to me.

    I feel like certain things are better done on another type of tool, like cutting thin strips can be better done on a bandsaw.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #47
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    Best wishes for a full recovery. Physical therapy can really improve your future utility and sooner started the better.

    Regretfully, I had a similar "oops" moment last fall but only needed 3 stitches in the tip of the thumb on my left hand. Your posting helps all of us to be aware at all times.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  3. #48
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    Aug 2008
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    Very sorry to hear about your accident Bruce. I do not want to seem insensitive but based upon what you have told us I believe that a SawStop would have saved you from almost all of your injuries.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Chapman View Post
    Very sorry to hear about your accident Bruce. I do not want to seem insensitive but based upon what you have told us I believe that a SawStop would have saved you from almost all of your injuries.
    Robert, so would using the guard have prevented the injuries.

    Hopefully Bruce recovers well and his cantor provides a learning opportunity for others......Regards, Rod.

  5. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Robert, so would using the guard have prevented the injuries.

    Hopefully Bruce recovers well and his cantor provides a learning opportunity for others......Regards, Rod.
    Tripping or falling over the tablesaw (say due to a medical condition) is not unheard of as a cause of table saw injuries. Depending on how the loss of balance actually happens, a blade guard may or may not protect the operator from serious injuries. For example, if the operator's hand slid under the guard from the tripping, the injury would not be reduced. The guard is made of plastic (polycarbonate?) and can be cut through if it is pushed on the side.

    The only reliable way to keep any blade-contact injury if and when it happens to a minimum is the kind of technology employed by sawstop or Reaxx, blade guard used or not. Of course, the blade guard (and riving knife/splitter) should be used whenever possible (but every experienced woodworker knows that is not always possible, unless an alternative tool is used). In my shop, about 15% of tablesaw cuts cannot be made with the blade guard put in place.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 03-17-2019 at 12:19 PM.

  6. #51
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    I like the idea of an overhead guard for that purpose, it can be over the blade for everything except cuts where the work is standing on edge. I plan one of those for the tablesaw I’m receiving.

    Ive worked in commcerial shops for metal fabrication, they were very clean and careful not to have stuff in the walkways, or on top of work surfaces. Carts were used for partially complete work and materials so that work surfaces can be kept clear. I found it difficult to not work with those rules after I stopped working in a commcercial environment.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  7. #52
    Brian,

    As a sawstop user, I find its dust collection blade guard a motivation to use, because it really works as a dust collection device (except for edge cuts, or with reduced effectiveness when using the miter gauge). Even when cutting mdf. Every time I have to use the saw without the guard (relying on only the under the table dust collection), I can tell the difference from the dust left on the table. For that reason alone, I want to use the guard. Unless the guard gets in the way, I see no benefits of not using it. Can anyone give some practicial examples of why the guard (unless it is a bad one) should not be used?

    Simon

  8. #53
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    I work in a tiny space without much outside air exchange so every bit of dust collection is appreciated.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Day View Post
    Not very long ago I was at the table saw trimming the last of four legs of a table I was building. I had turned the saw off for a second to clean some debris off then got ready to do the last one, when I made the mistake of using a push stick instead of my gripper or push block. After I got about half way through the leg I moved a little to the left and stepped on an extension cord I had laid down on the floor ( another mistake) causing me to lose my balance which in turn caused me to lose control of push stick, and you guessed it, left hand into the blade. That night I had two hour surgery, resulting in 210 stitches, majority internal. I lost the left corner of little finger, somehow missed ring finger, cut down into the knuckle on the dirty finger, and lost the tip of the pointer finger also severing the tendon. Pictures below show prior and post surgery. It happened on August 16th and I am still having therapy.

    With all the down time I had I started watching guys on you tube and sort of keeping track of all the mistakes I would see and I saw plenty. I was sort of stunned to see how many would put their hands so close to the blade, doing cross cuts with a miter gauge with board against fence, on and on. It just amazed me how many guys was so careless around the table saw.

    They say drinking and driving don't mix, neither does careless mistakes and table saws.
    I have said many times here that push sticks are dangerous unstable things and that is the best thing that can be said for them. I hope your recovery is as speedy as it can be with minimal after effects on the fingers.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  10. #55
    I liked my push sticks. I find them safe and useful. I also always position myself and push with the assumption that I'm about to discover that I've developed some type of seizure disorder.

  11. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    I liked my push sticks. I find them safe and useful. I also always position myself and push with the assumption that I'm about to discover that I've developed some type of seizure disorder.
    Good luck, if you're using this kind https://www.homedepot.com/p/POWERTEC...1029/207154140


    Simon

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Tripping or falling over the tablesaw (say due to a medical condition) is not unheard of as a cause of table saw injuries. Depending on how the loss of balance actually happens, a blade guard may or may not protect the operator from serious injuries. For example, if the operator's hand slid under the guard from the tripping, the injury would not be reduced. The guard is made of plastic (polycarbonate?) and can be cut through if it is pushed on the side.

    The only reliable way to keep any blade-contact injury if and when it happens to a minimum is the kind of technology employed by sawstop or Reaxx, blade guard used or not. Of course, the blade guard (and riving knife/splitter) should be used whenever possible (but every experienced woodworker knows that is not always possible, unless an alternative tool is used). In my shop, about 15% of tablesaw cuts cannot be made with the blade guard put in place.

    Simon
    Hi Simon, good points however the guard and splitter or riving knife are the only common protections available from kickback injuries. SawStop will not prevent a kickback injury.

    I've managed to arrive at the point where all my table saw operations involve a guard, ( I have 3 types for my saw), or I use a stock feeder.

    Thanks for a great discussion, and for being such a safety conscious operator.............Regards, Rod.

  13. #58
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    A push stick will not keep the work from rising up like a push shoe will.
    NOW you tell me...

  14. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Hi Simon, good points however the guard and splitter or riving knife are the only common protections available from kickback injuries. SawStop will not prevent a kickback injury.
    .Regards, Rod.
    Agreed that the finger-saving technology is not meant for preventing kickbacks.

    In fact, even the riving knife or splitter does not prevent all kickbacks but serves to reduce the chances of kickbacks, because there is a gap between the knife/splitter and the blade. If the stock is pinched between the fence and the blade BEFORE the stock reaches the knife/splitter, kickback can still happen.

    A feeder or the like which allows only one direction (forward) for the stock to move will prevent kickbacks.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 03-19-2019 at 10:57 AM.

  15. #60
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    Plus one for Simon and Ole's responses. Several times in the past, I have had those basic push sticks slip or the workpiece twisted while using them. Years ago, I copied the handle on my hand saw, and made several push shoe types. I have much more control over the workpiece now.


    My local WW club has a raffle at each meeting. I think I will make a couple extras and donate them. It would be nice if someone there has a laser, and we could make up some with our logo for club members who are just getting started.


    EDIT: I also have the Gripper, as well as Jessem's roller guides, and several special purpose push sticks/shoes. All work well for their intended purpose, but none are good for all uses. The above push shoe is my go to for about 75% of the time.
    Last edited by Rick Potter; 03-19-2019 at 12:21 PM.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

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