Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 107

Thread: New shop build, the MBS

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Crozet, VA
    Posts
    184
    Jon - I feel your pain on the subs. Anytime we need to get something down at our house I usually contact at least 4 contractors, because I know at least 2 of them will never show. It’s kind of amazing anything ever gets built! Project looks great so far.

    -Tom
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Snider View Post
    My kids have decided to call the new shop the Marland (our street) Boat Shop, hence the MBS in the title of this thread. They had a little fun with this at Christmas with this plaque to me.

    Attachment 405373
    Clearly the kids recognize your passion. I'd probably keep them at this point!

    It looks to be shaping up as a great work space and the memory of the problems will soon fade. I GC'd my previous house and dealt with much the same: subs know I will only be building ONE; a 'builder' can offer steady work, perhaps for years. Guess who gets left standing at the altar? (Some were princely anyway, some I wanted to commit atrocities on.)

    One of your photos looks like the left flank of Cheyenne Mtn ... like maybe you are in the Broadmoor area?? (I spent a few childhood years on W. Fontenaro.)
    Molann an obair an saor.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,543
    Yea, getting through "the processes" with a building project is why a good GC gets great money...it can prematurely age anyone for sure. Your kids did you proud on that name and sign!!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    Clearly the kids recognize your passion. I'd probably keep them at this point!

    It looks to be shaping up as a great work space and the memory of the problems will soon fade. I GC'd my previous house and dealt with much the same: subs know I will only be building ONE; a 'builder' can offer steady work, perhaps for years. Guess who gets left standing at the altar? (Some were princely anyway, some I wanted to commit atrocities on.)

    One of your photos looks like the left flank of Cheyenne Mtn ... like maybe you are in the Broadmoor area?? (I spent a few childhood years on W. Fontenaro.)
    Good eye Malcolm!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Here’s a pic of what these dories are designed for. You may recognize this pic, significantly retouched, on the cover of a popular book, The Emerald Mile:

    317DFB2A-1A45-406F-881B-F09BCE7C1B5F.jpeg

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Snider View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Snider View Post
    I can see myself with a fly rod in the first photo. Second one .... not this child!

    Edit - I always thought the basic idea of a boat was to keep the water OUT. (And guessing the seats up front are the 1st Class section?)
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 03-10-2019 at 11:23 AM.
    Molann an obair an saor.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    The decks are covered with fairly watertight hatches, as required by the Grand Canyon NP regs. Some water still gets inside the hatches. The cool thing is the ingenious design for water drainage, dreamt up by the crew that pioneered these boats, Grand Canyon Dories, Keith Steele and Jerry Briggs, with several subsequent modifications. Tens of gallons coming in the undecked areas have to get out quick or boat gets really hard to move and may flip. In my boat, the oarsman’s footwell is raised above waterline and two 2” PVC pipes drain through the hull to each side. Plus there’s another pipe under each passenger seat. More recent mods use battery powered sump pumps.
    Last edited by Jon Snider; 03-11-2019 at 9:18 AM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Getting back on track here. If anyone is interested in more on the dories I have a blog which describes the build, www.westtavaputs.com. Hopefully it’s ok to post that link, o/w mods please remove.

    Here are some more early conceptual drawings:

    2055DAEE-4FA5-48F5-AC32-703A5AE749DD.jpgDCDF0DDC-597E-4E4D-BF56-AADFDF08F0B1.jpgAF53D5A2-CC62-4F2A-8BB9-3F9AC07532A2.jpg312DCF3B-07FE-46AB-AB2A-214C5E897577.jpg

    You can see from the sectional drawings I decided to go with an open ceiling over the boat building area, which will also serve as the assembly area when no boat is in the shop, with scissor trusses. The other half of the shop, the south end or “machinery” area will have 10’ ceilings with an overhead loft. At this point I was dreaming about using this space to store a boat, using an overhead beam and trolley hoist, but reality set in later.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
    Posts
    1,266
    Jon,
    Looking at cross sections and your height restriction (code) reminded me of something. I learned on my house build that the code enforcement department (at least in my previous jurisdiction) measures the height of a building in what at the time seemed very odd: they go halfway up the main plane of the roof, then extend a horizontal line outward until 10' clear of the associated outside wall, then drop a vertical line to the finished surface (of the lot/yard). This vertical distance is deemed the height of the structure.

    As you can imagine, the ridge is considerably higher. In my case, the 18:12 pitch allowed for a MUCH higher roof-line.

    No idea if this applies in your area, and probably way too late to be of any use to you, but thought i would mention for posterity...
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 03-10-2019 at 5:56 PM.
    Molann an obair an saor.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    262
    Looking good.

    The scissor trusses made a big difference on the upstairs portion of my shop by keeping The OA height to a minimum while maximizing ceiling space.

    Can't tell from your photos for sure - Are the two elevation photos labeled "Section A", and "Section B" the building ends or are they intermediate sections?

    The reason I ask is if you are building yourself, and the photos represent the gable ends there are some considerations for framing the scissor truss wall you may or may not be aware of.

    I just went through this so let me know if you need any further information.
    Regards,

    Kris

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Quote Originally Posted by Kris Cook View Post
    Looking good.

    The scissor trusses made a big difference on the upstairs portion of my shop by keeping The OA height to a minimum while maximizing ceiling space.

    Can't tell from your photos for sure - Are the two elevation photos labeled "Section A", and "Section B" the building ends or are they intermediate sections?

    The reason I ask is if you are building yourself, and the photos represent the gable ends there are some considerations for framing the scissor truss wall you may or may not be aware of.

    I just went through this so let me know if you need any further information.
    thx Kris. They are just representative sections through each area.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    Jon,
    Looking at cross sections and your height restriction (code) reminded me of something. I learned on my house build that the code enforcement department (at least in my previous jurisdiction) measures the height of a building in what at the time seemed very odd: they go halfway up the main plane of the roof, then extend a horizontal line outward until 10' clear of the associated outside wall, then drop a vertical line to the finished surface (of the lot/yard). This vertical distance is deemed the height of the structure.

    As you can imagine, the ridge is considerably higher. In my case, the 18:12 pitch allowed for a MUCH higher roof-line.

    No idea if this applies in your area, and probably way too late to be of any use to you, but thought i would mention for posterity...
    As I’m sure many here are aware, it ultimately depends on who’s at the RBD desk that day or does your framing inspection. The amount of variance I experienced in various decisions during this process was incredible.

    But the height issue really wasn’t too big. OTOH, calling it a “garage” was a deal breaker. By this point I had committed to at least a crawl space (I wanted access below for ducting, compressed air pipes and electricity, plus a softer floor on my feet. Also building boats requires frequently nailing jigs to the floor during the early framing and attaching the stem and transom which wasn’t going to happen on concrete). I was able to convince the city that no one would drive cars on this particular structural floor and we settled on calling it a workshop.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Getting the go ahead I settled on a 40 x 28’ footprint. After talking to several friends, plus a couple of trips where I had a chance to tour some shops, and finally the info from the many enablers, er nice folks, here at SMC and OWWM, convinced me to go with a full basement over a crawl space. My thinking was the “small” increase in cost would be offset by the chance to put the DC, compressor, and 3-phase idler in the basement, plus complete flexibility with current, and any future, ductwork and electrical runs.

    Better now, than sorry later

    7AC4E7FB-BA0E-4B02-ABF1-1CBADE8A0862.jpeg

    Not to to mention I could make the basement a spot for a current and future metal shop, and save a corner for a future CNC.

    So before I started framing, I borrowed a friends SkyTrak and lowered my Monarch 10EE down into the basement. If I ever sell the house it might just stay there. My structural engineer did say he could come up with a floor hatch mod if I wanted.

    For a price.

    A62F8C39-C5B9-4142-B49D-480A68F77ABC.jpg

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,543
    Getting a CNC downstairs will be, um...difficult...unless it's a bench-top or a kit format if larger. Trust me on that... You'll have it in the main shop for sure!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    197
    Maybe a CNC Router Parts one. But that’s a long way down the line. If ever. It would be nice for carving the mandolin and arch top guitar backs and tops, plus many boat parts.
    Last edited by Jon Snider; 03-12-2019 at 8:30 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •