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Thread: Got Some Planing to Do!!!

  1. #31
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    Wow, it has been awhile since much work has been done on this project. Two decks, a few of other small projects and many other things to pull me away from 'the big one.'

    My first plan for this bench was to use hunks of 4X6 acquired from the reject bin at the Orange Borg. The sight of some 6X6 lumber at Wilco being used in displays instilled a little lumber envy. It got me to consider laminating some ash to the 4X6.

    The final adjustment of one piece to remove a localized hump:

    a Planing Before Gluing.jpg

    The final fit had a few thousandths of spring in the middle.

    Holes were bored to use dowels for aligning the two pieces. A depth gauge was used when boring the 4X6:

    b Boring with Depth Stop.jpg

    One has to be careful to stop when the gauge touches the surface. Continuing will pull the auger in and cause the gauge to move up the bit. If doing a lot of boring to the same depth it is wise to have a quick way to check the gauge after each use. This is also a good idea if one is using a piece of tape as a gauge.

    With the holes bored the dowel pins are inserted. Here a clamp is holding pieces of scrap to guide the ash lamination into place:

    c Dowel Pin Set Up.jpg

    The piece to be laminated is carefully aligned and lowered on to the dowel pins. When it is in place it is pressed down on to the pins, making an impression for setting aligning a drill bit.

    In this case the gauge used during the boring of holes on the 4X6s was set at one inch. One of my habits is to count the number of turns of an auger bit once the cutting edges start removing shavings. In this case it was ~30 turns. When boring the ash, only 10 turns were used so the lead screw wouldn't penetrate. The dowels were cut to 1-1/4" and tested in a dry fit.

    As much as folks hate junk mail, it is one of the best sources of free glue spreaders:

    d Free Glue Spreaders.jpg

    These can also be used as shoe horns. They come in handy in the kitchen when scraping gunk off of a plate or cookware. Keep a couple in the car for scraping frost off the windshield. They can be used once and tossed or they can be cleaned and used again. Titebond® is easy to scrape off when it dries.

    e Spreading Glue.jpg

    No brush or roller to worry about.

    Got close to using all my clamps:

    f All C.amped Up.jpg

    There was still about a half dozen to go.

    So much more to plan and do before this project is done.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #32
    Jim,

    Your description of moving big hunks of hunking wood brought a smile. It ain't easy for us OFs.

    ken

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken hatch View Post
    Jim,

    Your description of moving big hunks of hunking wood brought a smile. It ain't easy for us OFs.

    ken
    My folks used to have a furniture and appliance store. My father taught me a lot about getting something to move without hurting myself or over expending my efforts.

    Though trying to move a leg being laminated off the bench with all those clamps was one of my harder movings of a hunk of weighty wood in awhile.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #34
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    Nice work, Jim....Looking good.
    Jerry

  5. #35
    I chuckled over your "I Love Lucy" reference in the thread title. I appreciate your thorough description of each step and technique that you employ. For example, I had never seen the string leveling technique before. Glad to have that one filed away for future use now.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Heaps View Post
    I chuckled over your "I Love Lucy" reference in the thread title. I appreciate your thorough description of each step and technique that you employ. For example, I had never seen the string leveling technique before. Glad to have that one filed away for future use now.
    Howdy Charlesm welcome to the Creek and thank you for your reply on the "I Love Lucy" reference.

    Stanley Covington used to post some great tutorials and how to pieces that many enjoyed. The string technique was one he shared. Others also posted how they have used string in similar ways.

    It was discussed in this thread:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....The-Stringline

    It is possible to find some of a person's old posts:

    Ancient Tools.png

    Click on a person's name on one of their posts, then click on "View Forum Posts."

    It will open a page with the person's posts.

    Beware, reading Mr. Covington's posts can keep a person engaged for hours.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 09-15-2019 at 2:20 PM. Reason: wording change
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #37
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    It has been awhile for me to add anything to this project. Hopefully a deal more can be done before most of my time has to be directed to other projects around the property needing to be done.

    One of the vises for this bench will a pattern maker’s vise purchased from Woodcraft. Often these are mounted proud of the front edge of the vise. My preference has been for a vise flush with the front. A piece of scrap was used to see how far back into the top of a bench the vise could be set and still maintain its full range of movement:

    a Test Fitting Vise.jpg

    The layout on the bench top was initially done using a copy of the template in the installation instructions:

    b Initial Layout.jpg

    The set back was then incorporated in to this as the work was being done.

    First was cutting a channel for the vise’s screw and its housing:

    c Cutting a Channel.jpg

    For jobs like this it is nice to have a large back saw. There were two dogs on the side seen here. The other side was secured by a pair of wedges clamped agains two more dogs:

    d Clamp & Wedges.jpg

    This is where having some big chisels comes in handy:

    e Big Bopper Meets Big Chisel.jpg

    When cutting through dados it helps to avoid unwanted blow out by chamfering the waste on the far side down to the bottom of the dado:

    f Chamfer the Back Side.jpg

    One of my rabbet planes (Stanley #90 ’steel cased’) came in handy for cleaning up the dado. A lot more cutting, chopping, paring, slicing and checking:

    g More Cutting, Paring & Checking.jpg

    Having removed the hinge from the vise made it easy to test the fit:

    h Checking the Hinge Mortise.jpg

    The hinge originally had a little play in it. It probably doesn’t matter much in use but it kind of bothered me. That was my original reason for removing the hinge so the pins could be shimmed a little to remove the wiggle.

    If anyone is interested images of removing the hinge can be posted. It was already included in a different thread about a pattern vise. It is unknown to me if other pattern maker’s vises use two pins instead of one through pin. This vise uses two.

    More to follow as time allows.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #38
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    thanks for posting....GOOD PROJECT WELL DONE!!!
    Jerry

  9. #39
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    I don't know why, but this showed up on my computer today. I am glad it did.
    I always thought Jim is a bit of a show off and now I know he is.

  10. #40
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    After some more sawing and a lot of chisel work the vise mounting mortise was finished:

    a Finished Vise Mortise.jpg

    Yesterday some time was spent working on the apron:

    b Smoothing Apron.jpg

    This is the surface that will be on top. Some folks prefer a bench without an apron. That is fine. This bench will also have a tool tray, another ‘bad idea’ in the minds of many.

    The glue edge was smoothed up a bit before final fitting:

    c Apron Glue Surface.jpg

    This image is mostly to show the set up to secure the piece while it was being worked. The squeeze clamp at the close end with a couple of dogs on the right and dogs & wedges clamped on the left. This allows for planing along the length as well as transverse planing while preventing the work from sliding around.

    Part of my plan for the apron is to be able to include a sliding dead man when desired. The edges of the 3/4” slot were lain out with a gauge and then plowed:

    d Groovin' on a Wednesday Afternoon.jpg

    This is something that can be made easier with a liberal application of wax. A sharp blade is also helpful.

    As the slot is becoming established it might help to loosen the screws on the movable skate and pinch it a hair. This will help alleviate binding of the skates, a common problem with the Stanley #45.

    Another common problem is mis-registration. With deep slots and even with beads a moment of inattention can spoil the work.

    The instructions suggest starting at the far end of the work, then gradually working back toward the beginning of the detail being cut.

    For easier registration it may be helpful to set the plane into the work and then pull it back until the blade is at the start of the work:

    e Stanley #45 Registration.jpg

    Then proceed forward.

    After the slot was cut, the sharp corners were smoothed with a #2 hollow:

    f #2 Hollow to Break the Edge.jpg

    Hopefully more work can be done on this soon. There are a few things on the base that need some thought.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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