Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 100

Thread: Do Pros use rough sawn boards for Kitchen cabinet builds?

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    Warren,

    A waste of lumber imop..

    Thing is hiddious. I like our cans quite a bit “again we designed nothing” so I’m notbtooting my own horn.

    End panels on painted cabs are 1” miter wrapped with 1/2 mdf panels.

    FA4B4676-8518-418E-A555-8AFE8EE415E4.jpg

    60569D74-FDFB-4921-880C-C72A9AB37D07.jpg

    And to show why I call it partial overlay. Face frames just on the stiles and rails full height doors. We often build this style with a top rail flush to doors so I guess it’s like inset with no bottom rail.

    53F7A267-A1A5-4E90-BD69-604273D9522D.jpg

    Again I just build what I’m told to build.
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 03-03-2019 at 6:44 PM.

  2. #47
    thanks I guess I saw the final gable end panel on the right and its viewed from the front wondered on how thick it is. I think about this stuff too often. Materials used to do that one thing then design one thing, proportions another. when I was asking I wondered if its solid or not. If so then what thickness comes to mind. The kitchen place MDF as well for the panels. Off the gun painted stuff soft maple is a bit nicer. In the case of that kitchen I should have asked even if sprayed do they still use poplar like with the hand painted. I relate the material used to how it will be finished, sometimes an advantage to use a negative in the material to help in the final finish.

  3. #48
    thanks on the end panel would not have thought of that. So viewed from the front that end panel thickness is 1" if im understanding you correctly think so

  4. #49
    I posted two emails I dont see and rather than log off to see if they are there, thanks for the front on photo that shows the gable end proportion to the doors compared to looking at it from an angle. Appreciate you having and posting those and comments.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    Hmm that’s a good point.

    Built this kitchen months ago now. I assume the stile is 1.5: so I guess the end panel could not be 1” or the stile would have to be 2”. If a 2” style then 1” would work with 3/4 prefinished inside padded out with 1.4 mdf. I just feel like I remember the panel being 1” but that’s impossible. Maybe it’s the miter wrapped portion to create the cab depth for the 1” doors. That’s it the 1.5: stile is like 1.125 miter wrapped to a 3/4 panel.

    Final answer.


    f
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    thanks on the end panel would not have thought of that. So viewed from the front that end panel thickness is 1" if im understanding you correctly think so

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    Pretty terrible island right...

    You can say my cabs are garbage also I won’t be offended, again I just do as I’m told.

    If I was doing what I wanted it wouldn’t be building box cabinets with eyebrows hinges and soft close everything slathered in cv.

    But you know I don’t hate doing it’s either so it’s a compromise.
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    I posted two emails I dont see and rather than log off to see if they are there, thanks for the front on photo that shows the gable end proportion to the doors compared to looking at it from an angle. Appreciate you having and posting those and comments.

  7. #52
    im always going over all stuff in my mind. im looking at others work, im thinking about my own stuff. Asking those questions we cover some other aspects. The burried magnet, okay ive done that. Then magnet strength and door bumper thickness are aspects. Im typing to you and cant read your last email its not there. Sorry to be criticizing but thanks on all the answers felt better when you said someone else did the island seeing the first shot.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    1,660
    As I said it might hurt if I had anything to do with it. On the other hand if I was dumb enough to orient the panels that way I’d deserve it.

    Plus when I first saw that island the upside down panels were the first thing I noticed. It’s kinda funny as the shop that subbed us the paint portion kept the walnut portion of the job in house. When i showed up on site and saw that island all I could do was shake my head and think “great that kitchens botched now”..

    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    im always going over all stuff in my mind. im looking at others work, im thinking about my own stuff. Asking those questions we cover some other aspects. The burried magnet, okay ive done that. Then magnet strength and door bumper thickness are aspects. Im typing to you and cant read your last email its not there. Sorry to be criticizing but thanks on all the answers felt better when you said someone else did the island seeing the first shot.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    1,815
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    JR if you dont warranty anything over that length why not just step up to thicker material for those longer doors, its not going to wiggle and its more stable.
    Well, I'm not building the cabinets, just supplying doors. I'll build whatever they want.
    JR

  10. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Everything we build paint grade is paint grade soft maple and mdf panels. We are thinking of switching to poplar as it seems much more stable and with the dimension vrs rough topic it seems much more flat when you receive a order.
    Try buying a higher grade of soft maple first. I stopped buying the PG grade a long time ago. You pay a little bit more, but the higher yield offsets it completely and then some.

    We still use soft maple for face frames and most of the paneled ends. We switched to euro beech for door parts when being painted though. Little more money, but straighter and good yield.

    Poplar is going the other way in ease and quality in my opinion.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwestern Connecticut
    Posts
    7,144
    All the shops I've been in use rough or hit and miss depending on species, availability, timing, usually get one edge ripped on the hit and missed too presently. Hard to make doors flat using s3s, I suppose it would work for many FF's and fillers, but everything seems to go better when the process starts with flat square parts. Stock prep isn't that high of a total % of labor on a given job, so its chasing marginal stuff. Just ripping parts to width from prepped lumber can lead to bows and warping, seems better to do that while stock is still a bit fat? I worked at a place where we flattened and milled stuff for other shops occasionally, it was always interesting to talk to guys who were used to using "flatish" S3S after they used actual flat square parts. invariably it was "Wow, stuff goes together easier when we start with your stuff." I guess its what your used to?
    "A good miter set up is like yoga pants: it makes everyone's butts look good." Prashun Patel

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,744
    The cabinet makers at this shop in the town where I lived as a child start with trees.

    https://www.wellborn.com/d2pages.php?item=OC

  13. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Warren,

    A waste of lumber imop..

    Thing is hiddious. I like our cans quite a bit “again we designed nothing” so I’m notbtooting my own horn.
    I honestly dont know that I find anything hideously wrong with the "upside down" cathedral on the island. The notion of cathedral up has been a faith-based convention for years (everything must be looking upwards). A lot of the geometry of furniture and cabinet making (not that these boxes have any shape or form to the exterior) is complemented by orienting cathedrals down.

    The sad fact is that 99.9% of the consumers out there in this day and age really dont care, dont know, dont care to know, and as horrific as it sounds, if their checks clear, it is what it is. If your the type thats going to drive a cabinet-sentric (sp) stake in the ground on principal thats great if you have the work to show them to the door.

    Working to someone elses standard is never fun but at times it pays the bills.

    Nothing in that project overwhelmingly jumps out at me as repulsive. If someone has some need to tear it to shreds thats easily gained. If you delivered what you were asked and got paid, and made money, and didnt feel like to horrifically compromised your moral integrity as it pertains to wood I say great work.
    Last edited by Mark Bolton; 03-04-2019 at 1:56 PM.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  14. #59
    cathedrals always point up, thats a basic like a number of other things.

    Ive been in the homes of a number of trained in europe guys looked at all their furniture and spent alot of time with them over the years. See the same details in all of them trained in Germany no what area or type of shop they did their apprenticeship.
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 03-04-2019 at 2:29 PM.

  15. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    cathedrals always point up, thats a basic like a number of other things.

    Ive been in the homes of a number of trained in europe guys looked at all their furniture and spent alot of time with them over the years. See the same details in all of them trained in Germany no what area or type of shop they did their apprenticeship.
    Again, you speak to a belief in a taught tradition. Its just that simple. Its regurgitation as opposed to looking at things differently. There are numerous really cool pieces out there that compliment cathedral down.

    If you default yourself to that across the board and allow no exception then so be it. You'll likely be in the dust one day, or maybe already are. The world is moving fast. Stodgy tradition is imperative to keep us grounded but its not the overwhelming and unquestionable guiding force. As already stated the sad guiding force in this day an age is consumerism over design. You're going to have to deal with it, or die. One of the two will come true. Take your pick.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •