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Thread: Do Pros use rough sawn boards for Kitchen cabinet builds?

  1. #31
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    For cabinet doors, I buy all lumber hit and miss planed to 15/16". That lets you see the color and grain easily and tends to reveal problem boards. We straight line rip into strips and S4S on a moulder before chopping into staves for panel glue-up and rail/stile parts. For jobs that have a lot of tall uppers, we will pre-chop so that shorter strips are going through the moulder so they end up flatter. We're only skimming off ~3/32" on the thickness, but this is enough to get flat doors at 13/16" finished thickness. I tend to use the more rift grain edges of planks for the bulk of the frames, and the flat grain for panels.
    JR

  2. #32
    always jointed and planed from rough. JR on those longer doors how long is long. Ive looked at some of the top kitchen companies with long doors at 13/16 and when I open them they bend. They have a magnet at one end only usually the top and as I pull on the handle the door will bend before the magnet releases. Last show i looked at the two door corners side by side were no longer flush, not helped by the door bending when opened. I think a lot of the british kitchen builders do 1" doors.

  3. #33
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    In my area 1” doors are standard in the high end market.

    We don’t do them unless specified and as mentioned above the 3/4 doors are cheap as all get out imop. Never in my house that’s for sure.

    I keep telling the boss 1” doors and FF standard and it won’t barely cost anymore. He keeps telling me to And or having me order 13/16..

    Imop it’s a big mistake. But you know I’m not the boss and it’s not my money..
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 03-03-2019 at 2:47 PM.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    always jointed and planed from rough. JR on those longer doors how long is long. Ive looked at some of the top kitchen companies with long doors at 13/16 and when I open them they bend. They have a magnet at one end only usually the top and as I pull on the handle the door will bend before the magnet releases. Last show i looked at the two door corners side by side were no longer flush, not helped by the door bending when opened. I think a lot of the british kitchen builders do 1" doors.
    Long for me is about 40 - 48". My customers seem to all use just euro hinges, no magnets. I don't warranty anything over 48" tall.
    JR

  5. #35
    I've always disliked overlay doors, don't think I could get used to whole inch thick.

  6. #36
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    Yeah 1” for inset or partial Inset overlay only. Slab style overlay I agree 1” would be weird.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I've always disliked overlay doors, don't think I could get used to whole inch thick.

  7. #37
    Mel wasnt asking about doors on boxes or over frames, I should have said inset. I think Patrick is talking inset as well. I didnt know anyone does partial overlay door? Ive seen that in Upper Quebec furniture and German stuff but its always on furniture so wonder what you are talking. Its a thing of the past I thought definitely a different look than inset, a little less formal or something.

    atrick thanks on the 1" thing. Ive done even thicker on vanities say using left over material from other jobs. JR if you dont warranty anything over that length why not just step up to thicker material for those longer doors, its not going to wiggle and its more stable. That is what I dont get on those high end kitchens, I remember opening a longer door same company maybe a pantry. It bent like a bannana till the pulls released. I realize it goes back but there is no way stressing a door like that is positive. JR those kitchens im referring to all had mortise hinges, which brings up another thing I think about seeing a 1.00 magnet holding a door on an upper end kitchen. I keep thinking there must be nicer ways than that.

  8. #38
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    Rare earth magnet embedded in the door and ff.

    I guess I call partial overlay when you have a run of cabs that has a dog leg rail left and right but all the cabs in between are full overlay.

    Let me see if I can dig up a picture or two?

    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    Mel wasnt asking about doors on boxes or over frames, I should have said inset. I think Patrick is talking inset as well. I didnt know anyone does partial overlay door? Ive seen that in Upper Quebec furniture and German stuff but its always on furniture so wonder what you are talking. Its a thing of the past I thought definitely a different look than inset, a little less formal or something.

    atrick thanks on the 1" thing. Ive done even thicker on vanities say using left over material from other jobs. JR if you dont warranty anything over that length why not just step up to thicker material for those longer doors, its not going to wiggle and its more stable. That is what I dont get on those high end kitchens, I remember opening a longer door same company maybe a pantry. It bent like a bannana till the pulls released. I realize it goes back but there is no way stressing a door like that is positive. JR those kitchens im referring to all had mortise hinges, which brings up another thing I think about seeing a 1.00 magnet holding a door on an upper end kitchen. I keep thinking there must be nicer ways than that.

  9. #39
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    Like this..

    These actually have 1” doors. We built them for another shop, everything was specified..

    I call this partial overlay I guess

    F10B935D-0AA5-49C2-8B67-56AC39128997.jpg

    A2B0E9F5-6E19-48AC-B7A2-AEA67CA980E0.jpg

    62490175-016E-4145-BD3D-E59BEEC3906F.jpg

  10. #40
    Yeah,that's a good look with that edge to edge design.

  11. #41
    thanks Patrick, understood I guess id call that full overlay but it doent have the look of a door plunked on a box. So you do those doors 1" as well. yes ive done the imbedded magnet top and bottom and also used bullet catches top and bottom as well even both same time thanks on that. grain on the island is upside down, apology for being negative on that comment.

  12. #42
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    Yup I agree,

    The shop we built the kitchen for did all the walnut. It was bleached or something also and imop looks like poo poo..

    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    thanks Patrick, understood I guess id call that full overlay but it doent have the look of a door plunked on a box. So you do those doors 1" as well. yes ive done the imbedded magnet top and bottom and also used bullet catches top and bottom as well even both same time thanks on that. grain on the island is upside down, apology for being negative on that comment.

  13. #43
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    Manistique, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    All of your material if your "in business" should be kiln dried to protect your customer, and protect yourself, against a lawsuit due to bug infestation as well as dimensional stability. You drop a piece of work that was made from 10 year old air dried wood into a modern home that doesnt have high dollar humidification (winter) and dehumidification (summer) and you may likely have some serious headaches.

    A workbench in a shop is a lot different than a $3K 8/4 hard Maple butcher block island. You build something like that out of 50 year old air dried lumber you may need to hang onto your hat.
    I should have been more direct. I do not build anything for others out of air dried lumber, especially since I have such a great resource to procure dried lumber. This is something that needs to be considered if you are going to have anyone mill lumber for you. How are you going to dry it?
    Rich Aldrich

    65 miles SE of Steve Schlumpf.

    "To a pessimist, the glass is half empty; to an optimist, the glass is half full; to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be." Unknown author



  14. #44
    thanks,

    while im being negative the lower rails should be wider, they look the same as the top rail if so should be wider. The end panel that you have what thickness is that and is it also solid not MDF and if its solid poplar or soft maple. I assume that is a sprayed white. I asked one top company recently and their painted stuff was poplar. Now if I was paying attention more I would have said poplar on hand painted only and soft maple for sprayed. Didnt think of it till day or two later.

  15. #45
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    End panel, on the island or fridge cab or wet bar?

    If island again we did not build it thank god. It’s uglly a hell. Let me find another picture if I can of a different angle, the stile rail proportions are just a mess.

    This project came to us with shop drawings not to be deviated from. We even had to use the same construction techniques the shop that subbed it to us would use had they built it themself.

    Zero of the design was up to us or up for negotiation. You know a architect and decorator probably drew it and sold it.

    Everything we build paint grade is paint grade soft maple and mdf panels. We are thinking of switching to poplar as it seems much more stable and with the dimension vrs rough topic it seems much more flat when you receive a order.

    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    thanks,

    while im being negative the lower rails should be wider, they look the same as the top rail if so should be wider. The end panel that you have what thickness is that and is it also solid not MDF and if its solid poplar or soft maple. I assume that is a sprayed white. I asked one top company recently and their painted stuff was poplar. Now if I was paying attention more I would have said poplar on hand painted only and soft maple for sprayed. Didnt think of it till day or two later.
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 03-03-2019 at 6:32 PM.

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