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Thread: New Tablesaw Fence Rails?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Parks View Post
    If I was going to build a fence I would take a long hard look at this
    I've seen it, it's pure genius, but also requires a welder, which I don't currently have. If I did have one (and some skill with it) I would give serious consideration of doing exactly what he's doing there.

  2. #17
    Did you paint them? I'm wondering what I should do getting them setup as rails to prevent rust. Paint seems like it would rub off over time with the constant motion of the fence sliding back and forth.

  3. #18
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    Certainly an inventive way to build a fence. That indexing on a threaded rod is pretty neat but there seems to be one drawback that I can see: Everything must be an increment of 1/16. Not all horrible but sometimes to get a sliding fit cutting spot on 1/16 may not work.

    About five years ago I put a DRO on my table saw. Worth every single penny, not only in convenience but in saved lumber. That is right, saved lumber. Before the DRO I would always make a few extra parts so that if things went wrong downstream I had some exact same size pieces to work with. That is not necessary with a DRO. I do not make spares any more.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Reischl View Post
    Certainly an inventive way to build a fence. That indexing on a threaded rod is pretty neat but there seems to be one drawback that I can see: Everything must be an increment of 1/16. Not all horrible but sometimes to get a sliding fit cutting spot on 1/16 may not work.
    It's been a while since I watched the video, but I believe that the entire threaded rod can be rotated for exactly that reason.

    Do you have a recommendation for a DRO? I must admit I seldom put on those self-adhesive tapes, since I expect to install them slightly off.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    It's been a while since I watched the video, but I believe that the entire threaded rod can be rotated for exactly that reason.

    Do you have a recommendation for a DRO? I must admit I seldom put on those self-adhesive tapes, since I expect to install them slightly off.
    I am using the Wixey WR 700. I forgot to mention above that one of the other things really handy about it is that it makes cutting thin strips a breeze. The way that is done is via the incremental mode.

    Yup, I saw that the entire rod could be rotated, the only problem with that is then the zero is lost not to mention one does not know exactly how much the fence will move. If a person is on a really tight budget it is a reasonable solution, otherwise I would spend an extra $120 and have some real accuracy and the ability to clamp the fence anywhere.

    Digital stuff has really changed how we do things in the workshop. I have been trying to figure out a way to add a DRO to my radial arm saw setup. That is a bit challenging so far. Time to google something up on YouTube!

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Reischl View Post
    I am using the Wixey WR 700.
    Thanks, I was looking at that one, seems pretty nice. Not sure where I would mount the connection on the fence. The old Grizzly's didn't have quite a conventional Beisemeyer style fence.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Reischl View Post
    Yup, I saw that the entire rod could be rotated, the only problem with that is then the zero is lost not to mention one does not know exactly how much the fence will move. If a person is on a really tight budget it is a reasonable solution, otherwise I would spend an extra $120 and have some real accuracy and the ability to clamp the fence anywhere.
    It's 1/16th per thread, so that would appear to mean that a 1/2 turn = 1/32nd, a 1/4 turn 1/64th, etc. Much more accurate than giving it little pats. You could zero out when installing a new blade, just like the DRO.

    Also I don't think you'd need to do that all that often. Usually the cuts I'm making are on nice even numbers, at which point a 1/16th is plenty accurate. Not to mention the repeatability of removing the slop in the last 1/16th of an inch by always going to the same place when clamped down.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew More View Post
    Thanks, I was looking at that one, seems pretty nice. Not sure where I would mount the connection on the fence. The old Grizzly's didn't have quite a conventional Beisemeyer style fence.
    You might have to fabricate a piece of flat steel and do a bit of drilling and tapping. I use a unifence and that required a bit of finagling too.

    The trick to thin strips is to measure a scrap piece, does not matter what it is, and then cut it in half and then put the two pieces together and measure again. The difference is how thick the saw blade is cutting which as we all know can be a bit different than the stated thickness of the blade.

    Then take a clean up cut along the piece that will be used to create the strips. Select incremental mode. The gage will zero. Move it the thickness of the blade plus the thickness desired. Cut. Zero again. On the wixey this is done by toggling between incremental and absolute. Wash, rinse, repeat. Perfect strips everytime!

  8. #23
    Good to know.

    FWIW, it appears this project is on hold. The old G1023's fence system is pretty unique in a number of ways, and one of those appear to be the size of the rails. They're pretty darned close to 1 7/8" which is not a normal size of steel stock. I suspect that the manufacturer bought the stock at 2", and then ground off 1/16" from each side to ensure it was flat, but who knows. Anyway, it's off enough that 2" won't go in, and 1 3/4" is too loose. At least I had the foresight to bring the fence along with me to check the fit before buying $120 of non-returnable steel.

  9. #24
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    Not sure what all this will cost you for what you are trying to do but have you looked at the Incra TS system? I have one and it has been the best addition to my shop since I installed it. A complete game changer as far as setup and repeatability is concerned. It also has router capabilities on your table saw. Something to think about.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Reischl View Post
    Yup, I saw that the entire rod could be rotated, the only problem with that is then the zero is lost not to mention one does not know exactly how much the fence will move.
    Not sure if I follow all that correctly, but if I do... You know pretty precisely how much it moves. Theoretically it moves 1/16" per turn, so 1/32" per half turn, 1/64" per 1/4 turn, and 1/128" per 1/8 turn. If there is some slop it may not be that precise, but I can see it being pretty good if well made.

    EDIT:
    OOPS! I see someone already pointed this out. Sorry.
    Last edited by Pete Staehling; 03-21-2019 at 8:02 AM.

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