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Thread: Bandsaw Resaw Fence For Tall Stock - Which Is Better

  1. #31
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    And then there is this view ...



    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  2. #32
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    Derek

    Nice Video. I like that Little Ripper! I'm going to find out of it is available in the US. I have some really, really, nice quilted maple billets with a twist to them. that I've never milled because I don't want to lose the amount of material necessary to joint them first.

    As to the fence;
    Many years ago ,Stu in Tokyo, on one of the forums, posted a photo series of his Hitachi resaw bandsaw. I noticed that the fence on the Hitachi only extended as far as the blade, so that the material coming off the back end of the blade had free space to relieve stress.
    If I am resawing a board that I know is going to relieve stress, I affix a piece of 3/4" MDF to the face of my full length fence so that I create a 3/4" gap space behind the blade, and between the actual fence for the material to relieve into. Once the material is past the blade, you no longer need the fence.
    Not all wood is going to react like the material in that video, so you kind of have to read the grain, and be somewhat familiar with the species of wood.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  3. #33
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    Hi earlier video (below) is the more provocative--low tension, disengaged side guides, 3/8" blade, tracking at the very back of the wheel.
    Note that he is focused on drift, as opposed to other possible issues, like barrel cuts.
    For wood that doesn't move much or very thin veneers (where there isn't much lateral pressure), I don't think there is much issue.
    If you are doing thick slices in wood where the kerf is opening, you'd probably be better with one of the resaw (point-type) guides that allow the wood to move behind the blade. (I really dislike the resulting board, though--maybe for a panel, but hard to work with if you want to put in a rabbett or do anything else with it)

    I like that he does all of his illustrations in the sawdust on the table.

    Last edited by Matthew Hills; 02-23-2019 at 9:27 AM.

  4. #34
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    Interesting Mike. I must try that.

    My Hammer N4400 has a fence which can adjust back-and-forth. I generally use a tall fence with this for resawing ...



    I can slide it back, as you describe ..



    I'll give it a go and see how well it works.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Hills View Post
    tracking at the very back of the wheel.
    FWIW, I'd have found it a little more convincing if he had moved the blade to the front of the wheel rather than the back. I may be off base here, but it always seemed to me that if the front of the teeth were supported it prevented them from turning into or out of the workpiece. I'd think that moving the blade to the back still accomplishes that. Still an interesting video though, I just don't find moving the blade back as convincing.

    I do think the little ripper looks interesting, but I don't see where you'd get by without switching to a fence when cutting thin pieces as you got to the last slices. Also I guess that for me it would be a solution looking for a problem to solve since I have had good luck just using a tall fence after creating a flat face by other means.

    That said if I were to start having problems with the kerf opening up and stressing the cut, using a fence that stops at the blade sounds like something worth trying. In that case, using a piece of MDF as Mike Cutler suggested to provide relief makes sense to me.

    I have had poor resaw performance at times that mimicked the problem he described with the opening kerf. The thing is that without exception it was immediately resolved by replacing the blade and properly adjusting the saw. I have never had issues like that with a fairly fresh blade and properly set up saw. So that raises the question, would the little ripper have made a nice straight cut without the blade change in those cases? I doubt it. Would it have made the blades last longer and prevented the blade's demise? Again I doubt it, but who knows?

    I am kind of intrigued, but probably not enough to buy one.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    And then there is this view ...



    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    This guy is interesting. I'll just keep doing it wrong (as shown in post 13). I slice 1/16" veneers over and over again off the same blank this way with nice consistent results. The variety of solutions for the variety of problems is one of the great values of the forums. Just because I'm not having the problem he is having doesn't mean that the they next guy isn't. The same "next guy" may look at the solutions I am happy to have been shown and wonder why I need that .
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I designed the box under the bandsaw table after noticing the amount of dust from the guides sprayed forward onto the floor where I stand.
    Works great for me too.
    G0513X-DC-Add 002.jpg . G0513X-DC-Add 003.jpg . G0513X-DC-Add 005.jpg

    I closed the throat just inside the lower cabinet.

    G0513X-DC-mod 002.jpg

    I put a piece of sheet magnet over the lower cabinet port as I do not even use it.

    G0513X-DC-mod 006 (6).jpg

    This is what the lower cabinet looks like after several months of use. Funny how the spoil always gathers at that right front corner.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 02-23-2019 at 10:36 AM.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Works great for me too. G0513X-DC-Add 005.jpg
    ...
    I closed the throat just inside the lower cabinet.
    G0513X-DC-mod 002.jpg
    Excellent! It's surprising how well this works.

    My Rikon came with a piece of flexible sheet (rubber?) placed to close that throat. It has a slit it it for the blade.

    When I used a shop vac the bottom inside of my cabinet still looked like layers a geologist would like to study. Now it's clean. I left lower open and connected it to a 4" duct.

    This method does prevent tilting the table with the box in place but I don't tilt the table. If I want to cut an angle I fasten an angled piece to the top of the table.

    JKJ

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Glenn,

    You included this pic of the blade on the wheel, but didn't say how the position affects the cut. Could you elaborate?

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Nice illustration. I've tried to explain it before but your pictures make it easier. In practice the stiffness and tension of a wide blade may keep it from angling so much when off center but it's better supported when in the center of the tire. I run mine right in the center. The adjustment on the 18" Rikon make this easy but on my smaller 14" Delta I had to add shim washers behind the upper wheel to get the blade to track where I wanted it. I know some say it doesn't matter but it does to me.

    JKJ

  11. #41
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    I was building a long framed panel today, and thought about this thread.

    Incidentally, these panels were sawn and thicknessed about 2 months ago. They were stickered and clamped. All perfectly flat and waiting to be used.



    This is the board I was sawing up for the frame. Hard Maple, about 200mm (8") wide. Unfortunately, I did not need anything that wide for the frames - which would have been great for this test. The frames are 60mm wide, and so this was first sawn on the table saw.

    I thought I would post a photo of this since we often discuss using a F&F jig to rip on a slider, but here I am using my Hammer K3 as a traditional table saw as the slider is 1250mm in length (too short for a long rip such as this one, which is 1.6m/63") ...




    A note about the bandsaw blade: I was not using the 1" Lenox CT Woodmaster. For such a narrow resaw all that was needed was a 1/2" bimetal blade.

    I posted a picture of the bandsaw resaw fence previously. I planned here to resaw a length with the fence pulled back, like so ...




    And also in the full position ...



    In each case the board demonstrated internal tensions, and ended up with a 5mm (combined) hollow in the centre ...



    What I noticed was:

    1. In the short fence mode, the board was easier to push. It was noticeable, in the full fence mode, that the board wanted to push away from the fence. Clearly, the short fence ended before these tensions manifested. Pushing along the full fence required more effort to keep the board pinned against the fence.

    2. The down side of the short fence is that it ends at the blade and registration is lost. This means that there is little, if any, support for the end of the board as it approaches the blade. The full fence supports the board all the way through.


    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  12. #42
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    That's pretty interesting Derek. Thank you for sharing that photo essay.

    It's a little cold and raining here right now, so maybe I'll head out to the shop and play with the bandsaw a bit. I want to improve the dust collection on my bandsaw and a few of the :hacks" I've seen here may accomplish that end for me.
    I don't actually know that I position the short fence to stop just prior to the blade, and I may have it just clear of the back edge of the blade. I really don't know?? I tend not to mess about with things and develop a solution to a problem I don't have. I also know that I've resawn with the entire length of the fence and had no issues either.
    I don't think there is ever just one solution to solve a problem. It's always good to have another option if a person runs into trouble
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    I want to improve the dust collection on my bandsaw and a few of the :hacks" I've seen here may accomplish that end for me.
    ...
    Mike, don't forget this thread: https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....on-for-bandsaw

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  14. #44
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    Derek,
    From the photo of the finished workpieces, it looks like you got an even cut, with the wood bowed in towards the kerf?
    Did you notice what point would have been binding to create the resistance with the full fence?


    My interpretation of the mini-ripper videos was that he was asserting the freed end would bow out, pushing against the fence, and pushing the workpiece back into the side of the blade. (This would mess up the registration on the fence, and the video also asserted that you'd end up dulling that side of your blade).

    If the kerf is closing, I'd think you wouldn't have this issue, so it was interesting to hear you were getting more resistance. I assume the cut width is otherwise even?

    Also, I would expect you can have the fence go past the teeth of the blade, trading off the support vs. the bowing effects.

    It is interesting that there haven't been many sliders for bandsaws... or splitters.

    Matt

  15. #45
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    Yet another home made fence. It slides on my Beisemeyer and can be placed forward or beyond the blade. It is 2" so I can still use the tape on the fence. I usually saw veneer with the thin part next to the blade and don't joint the face after each cut.DSCN3528.jpgDSCN3529.jpgDSCN3655.jpg

    The third picture is bad but the veneer is sawed on both sides and between .04 and .044 Dave

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