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Thread: Bandsaw Resaw Fence For Tall Stock - Which Is Better

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Bandsaw Resaw Fence For Tall Stock - Which Is Better

    I have some really nice wormy maple that I want to resaw, and don't want to lose anymore than the blade kerf (minimize planing). My stock Kreg fence has worked really good for short height boards, but the maple is 4x that size. My practice cuts on tall scrap have been less than desirable, so I need a better fence.

    There appears to be two different fence types for resawing. The first is like Kregs resaw guide with the curved face, or a point fence. The other is just a taller fence.

    I'm thinking that each fence type can produce bad cut results due to blade bowing (tall fence) or sloppy feed control (point fence), both resulting in too much wood loss.

    What type of fence do you use for tall pieces? Have you tried the other type and found that it didn't work?

    TIA.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    I use a tall fence. To me more important than type of fence is practice. My resawing was all over the place until I spent a lot of time setting the saw up and cutting lots of wood.

  3. #3
    ^ Ditto what Frank said. Sharp blade, smooth running saw, set your fence for drift, and go slowly.

    For what it's worth, I'm currently using a chunk of jointed QS white oak and 2 F clamps for a fence on a 20" delta and getting great results.

  4. #4
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    What saw are you using? Dave

  5. #5
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    I use a tall fence set parallel with the miter slot. It's built pretty robust so it doesn't deflect.





    The saw needs to be set up to cut smooth and straight (parallel with the miter slot) and the blade has to have enough tension to cut w/o bowing. I use face and edge jointed stock and just hold it against the fence for resawing. For slicing veneer I add a roller feather board to press the stock tight to the fence just ahead of the blade, copied from a design by John Lanciani.





    I do not reface the stock between slices.




    For both resawing and veneer slicing a constant feed rate is key to a consistent cut. Also note, slower is not necessarily better. There is an optimum speed that will minimize the kerf while still giving a straight cut. That speed might not yield the smoothest surface finish, but the piece will be thicker after sanding it smooth than one cut at a slower speed. I didn't believe that until I proved it to myself. I can't swear it's true will all blades but it was with the one I was using when I made the speed comparison.

    John

  6. #6
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    I have found that the blade really is the key to the whole thing and I have not so far found any need for a tall fence even cutting to the maximum depth on a Minimax. Using a Lennox Trimaster CT blade gives awesome results but others may have higher standards.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  7. #7
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    I use a tall short fence for that.....Rod

  8. #8
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    Mar 2018
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    Orwell, NY
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    I have resawn up to the capacity of my Jet 18" bandsaw, which is about 9-3/4", using the fence that came with the saw which is about 2+ inches high. I know how thick I want the piece I am cutting to be at the top, and I can see it and make sure it doesn't flop from side to side, and the bottom is controlled by the fence. The fence is parallel to the miter slot. I don't like the idea of compensating for drift, the bandsaw mill can't compensate so I have had to learn to get it to cut straight and I apply the same general ideas to the bandsaw in the shop. I am not resawing large volumes of wood, just enough for a guitar or two at a time, so I can afford to be slow.
    Zach

  9. #9
    For me tall fence, no special care for drift other than to be sure I have a decent blade in good shape on a properly set up saw. If there is a drift problem it is a bad blade or a bad saw setup in my experience. When that is the case I take the time to adjust the saw or change the blade as needed.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Shields View Post
    My practice cuts on tall scrap have been less than desirable
    Key point

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Shields View Post
    ..., so I need a better fence.

    I'm thinking that each fence type can produce bad cut results due to blade bowing (tall fence) or sloppy feed control (point fence), both resulting in too much wood loss.
    I dont know, but challenge these assumptions.

    Also be sure to understand CONTEXT of the different experiences of users here. What is acceptable to one person just parsing out some thick roughcut boards (like myself) would not be acceptable to someone making veneer out of highly exotic/rare species. Yet in a post they may communicate differing experiences.

    So from your post on what you are trying to achieve (reduce waste during resaw of wide wormy maple), I would say factors other than the fence may be equally if not more important. Such as blade choice, sharpness, any history of dulling one side of the blade, tension, feedrate, and finally fence.

    Share some other aspects of your setup and I bet there are some ideas on how to improve the results.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I use a tall fence set parallel with the miter slot. It's built pretty robust so it doesn't deflect.
    I see also that your fence drops down in height after the cut. Similar, it seems, to what Rod is doing.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Beckett View Post
    Also be sure to understand CONTEXT of the different experiences of users here. What is acceptable to one person just parsing out some thick roughcut boards (like myself) would not be acceptable to someone making veneer out of highly exotic/rare species. Yet in a post they may communicate differing experiences.

    So from your post on what you are trying to achieve (reduce waste during resaw of wide wormy maple), I would say factors other than the fence may be equally if not more important. Such as blade choice, sharpness, any history of dulling one side of the blade, tension, feedrate, and finally fence.

    Share some other aspects of your setup and I bet there are some ideas on how to improve the results.
    Good point. Good to consider all of that. Still I think the concerns are the same for all of us and it is a matter of the degree to which each the factors affect us.

    FWIW, to calibrate my previous comments, I'll say that a large portion of my re-sawing is for parts for musical instruments from rough planks and slabs. So the finished pieces are usually a bit thicker than veneer, but still pretty thin, most of it is under 1/8" after sanding. Also it is often some very select and highly figured wood, but mostly local species.

  13. #13
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    Align your machine.

    Blade Track 3.JPGBlade Track 2.JPGBlade Track 1.JPG

    I just run the stock fence which has a short and tall position. the tall position is about 6" but, I slice 11" tall veneer without issue. The face against the fence and the edge against the table are milled perpendicular. That seems to be all the guidance required. I do use a feather board so I can concentrate on feed rate.

    resaw veneer (1).jpgresaw veneer (2).jpgGnG Low CoD (16).jpg
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 02-22-2019 at 8:45 AM.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  14. #14
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    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    I regularly make cuts to the limit of my 18" Rikon bandsaw (12"). I don't have a photo but I devised a simple tall fence that clamps onto the existing fence. I used plywood for the fence and made a wooden support that clamps behind the fence with bolts in holes drilled through the fence. I don't remember how tall I made it but without walking down to the shop to look I'm guessing it's 6" or taller.

    I've tried both the curved and point supports and like the flat fence better. I tune my saws so there is no drift relative to the fence. Sharp blade is very important, as is adjusting the guides correctly.

    I think proper tension is even more important. I set tension with a good gage and I'm surprised at how much more tension is needed than what is shown on the useless indicators on any bandsaw I've checked. For example, with the 1/2" 4tpi .025 blade I'm using now I have to tension it to the mark the saw thinks will work with 1" blades.

    JKJ

  15. #15
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    Mike
    I have a 6" tall piece of aluminum plate that has been grafted to the stock fence on my Rikon 18". Same bandsaw that John K Jordan has.
    Here is a link with photos of the fence in post #13:
    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....iew&highlight=

    It's been "as is" for some 16 years now and has always worked just fine. I do not compensate for blade drift. Everything is square to the table.
    I have no idea if the miter slot is square to the blade. Never check, never cared, This saw is only used to resaw and I don't need the miter slot for anything other than feather boards.
    I have a 1" Lennox TriMaster, 2/3 varipitch blade installed, and I can hold consistent thickness of resawn pieces, to within 15 thousandths, when resawing by hand, regardless of height.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 02-22-2019 at 9:47 AM.
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