Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Basement Shop Floors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Commerce, GA
    Posts
    8

    Basement Shop Floors

    After a break for many years it looks like I am finally going to have a shop again. It will be a basement shop about 600 sq ft. The rest of the basement will be storage, an office, and a bathroom. Iím trying to figure out what to do with the floor. It is a brand new concrete slab.

    Years ago I made custom furniture as an employee. This would be a personal shop with the hopes of one day making a small side business.

    I have considered acid etching and dyeing. And Iíve also considered various wood options. So what does everybody do with basement shops?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,347
    I just read about used roll flooring used in gyms. Some sort of supper hard rubber mat. Can be bought used for cheap.
    Bill D.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Diego, Ca
    Posts
    1,130
    I sealed my workshop floor with a 2-part epoxy made for concrete (medium gray). Twenty five years later it is showing a few signs of wear but still in reasonable condition. If you wanted to get fancy, buy the type that comes with different colored speckles.

    If you have any water issues (seepage, wicking, efflorescence), whatever you put down may lift or bubble up.

    You are wise to seal it. It'll be easier to keep clean and it won't spot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    48,015
    If you have the head room, I'd do a floating wood floor...1.5" thick PT sleepers 16" OC with 1.5" foam insulation between and a layer of plywood or Advantec for the floor. That would be much more comfortable than the bare concrete. FW did an article on this method years ago and many folks have mentioned it over time.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Just walk on the concrete with the occasional anti fatigue mat. Thinking of switching to horse stall mats. Interlocking fatigue mats just slide around too much.
    Why do I bother with this hobby? Running outta walls to throw stuff through.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    River Falls WI
    Posts
    393
    I like the Horse/Cow stall Mats, but thinking more about the floating wood floor. John Heinz used the dimpled water proofing membrane on his basement floor with OSB on top. https://www.menards.com/main/buildin...4444226423.htm I was going to just do 1 " foam, but this will allow some drainage to happen if needed. My ceiling is low though, 7' 4", so very conscience of taking away any vertical space, and I am 6'4". The heating ducts are close too, because they are below the floor joists. Dan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    302
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fox View Post
    Just walk on the concrete with the occasional anti fatigue mat. Thinking of switching to horse stall mats. Interlocking fatigue mats just slide around too much.
    I agree, plus they are a pain to clean around. I considered mats for my shop at one time and concluded that a good pair of shoes was cheaper and easier than a shop full of mats.
    My shop has concrete floors and I had extra grit put into the sealer....not slippery even with dust or shavings and is easy to sweep.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,477
    I put industrial vinyl tile down in mine. Polished and waxed it and it looks fantastic!! Unfortunately with even a hint of sawdust it becomes an ice rink. I cant even stand a board on end and lean against the wall else it just slips out.

    So dont do that.

    Recently I laid the interlocking foam tiles over it (working around the equipment) and like these. Many here do not like these. I do not seem to have the slipping issue others mention.

    Prior to these I used antifatique mats but like the interlocking foam better. But it has been less than a year, so maybe by next year I will hate it.

    I have also seen interlocking wood flooring that has a rubber layer to it. Looks very straightforward. Generally speaking I do not like covering stuff up/adding layers in basements, too much risk for moisture/mold to form. But if it is certain to be moisture free then it might be ok.

  9. #9
    Just get a good pair of shoes. They'll do your feet more good than a shop full of rubber mats. An unfinished concrete floor works well as long as it's not too smooth. About the only downside is when something sharp is dropped. In a perfect world, I'd have a hardwood floor sanded to about 80 grit & finished with just a coat or to of BLO.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
    Posts
    339
    My basement shop has a plain concrete slab as its floor... well, I painted it with a thin layer of acrylic paint. On the other hand I live in a tropical country - actually at 12 mm from Capricorn line, so I can stay at 19-22įC at 99% of the year.

    If I live at more cold place I would consider a hard wood floor with some additional insulation, just in case.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
    Posts
    339
    Errata: 12 km, NOT 12 mm, of course!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •