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Thread: Biesemeyer Fence Glide Pads

  1. #1

    Biesemeyer Fence Glide Pads

    I broke a glide pad on my biesemeyer fence and thought I'd replace all the pads as some are quite gouged and very brittle. I can only find them for $5-12 each! Not sure I t to spend that much too vw all 6. Has anyone found a better solution?


    Thank you

    Mike

  2. #2
    Owwwww! You werent kidding were you?

    I found this old post - maybe it will help you. LINK It mentions using Teflon PTFE and includes a link to mcmaster carr..

    Seems like you also could also buy a piece of UHMW plastic (very slippery) and make your own.
    Last edited by Frederick Skelly; 02-18-2019 at 7:19 PM.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Owwwww! You werent kidding were you?

    I found this old post - maybe it will help you. LINK It mentions using Teflon PTFE and includes a link to mcmaster carr..

    Seems like you also could also buy a piece of UHMW plastic (very slippery) and make your own.
    If your existing pads are all gouged up you don't want teflon as it is slippery but very soft. Use high density polyethylene or UHMW. Both can be machined with woodworking tools and can be tapped if needed.

  4. #4
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    buy the thickness/width you want and cut to final size. Just a few dollars per foot:
    https://www.mcmaster.com/uhmw-polyethylene-sheets

  5. #5
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    The older Bies that I have looked at had what appeared to be Formica pads(?). UHMW or HDPE is easy to work and less costly than the ready-mades. My circa 2005 Bies had what appeared to be UHMW as it was not as "hard" as the HDPE I have worked with. For the function they serve a variety of materials could be used.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 02-19-2019 at 8:46 AM.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  6. #6
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    Thin UHMW or HPDE with some thin double stick "carpet" tape (usually white) can make some very nice replacements for not much money.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Thin UHMW or HPDE with some thin double stick "carpet" tape (usually white) can make some very nice replacements for not much money.
    I don't care for the carpet tape. It moves under lateral pressure, especially if your shop gets really warm in the summer like mine does. I would use turner's tape, if I did not buy the material with adhesive already on it.

  8. #8
    Great suggestions! The pads are .095 worn out so I'm ordering .125 x .75 x 2 foot uhmw for $3! I should be able to make what I need from that. Thank you.

  9. #9
    But a cheap cutting board. You'll have a lifetime worth of pads for 10 bucks.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    I don't care for the carpet tape. It moves under lateral pressure, especially if your shop gets really warm in the summer like mine does. I would use turner's tape, if I did not buy the material with adhesive already on it.
    Yes, that's true. I can move a little...of course, any of the "turner's tape" I've purchased in the past was just re-labeled carpet tape for some reason.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
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    I build Biese clones from time to time and stick uhmw pads on with contact cement. Have had no problem. If you could find some plastic rod the right size and drill through the "peg holes" and through the pad, put in a short piece of rod would help keep it in place.

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