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Thread: Worst construction crew ever vs two old dudes and a ladder

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    My son-in-law is an electrician.
    He wired my shop.
    He simply refuses to install a 3-prong outlet without the single ground wire on top.
    "They are designed that way in case a gap allowed something conductive to fall into the gap."
    Most I've seen are installed the other way around.
    That is how you have to install them in hospitals

  2. #32
    That may be how they install them in hospitals, but they don't HAVE to ....

    per Archtoolbox.com:

    Ground Pin Up or Ground Pin Down?
    There is an age-old debate about whether an electrical outlet should be mounted with the ground pin up or down. Unfortunately, there is not a fully accepted answer. However, it is commonly accepted that the National Electrical Code (NEC) of the United States, or NFPA 70, does not provide any specific direction for the orientation of the outlet.
    Some theories about the orientation of an outlet:

    • The outlet should be oriented with the ground pin up because if the plug comes slightly loose and a metal object were to fall from above, the ground plug, which usually does not carry current, would deflect the object so that it would not hit is live prongs. It is accepted that this idea began in health care facilities where many tools used for patient care are metal. The story goes that hospitals were wired by union electricians and as the unions grew the practice spread to other types of buildings.
    • The outlet should be oriented with the ground pin up because this pin is longer and the plastic around the plug is meatier, so it will help to keep the plug inserted in the outlet.
    • The outlet should be oriented with the ground pin down because a person grabbing the outlet will have their index finger at the bottom side of the plug and the index finger sticks out further than the thumb. Having the ground down will keep a person's index finger from touching the live pins.
    • The outlet should be oriented with the ground pin down because many common household items such as nightlights, timers, and battery chargers are oriented with the ground pin down. In addition, GFCI outlets, which have text on the reset and test buttons, are oriented with the ground pin down (and the text readable).

    A quick internet search provides comments that easily debunk any of these theories. The most basic answer is that it truly doesn't matter which way your outlets are oriented. Select the strategy that best works for you.
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
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    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    I caught a satellite installer going through my stuff when I returned from leaving the room briefly.
    I told him he would be fine with me standing in his back pocket for the remainder of the time, wouldn't he?
    I would follow up with a call to his employer. No excuse for that behavior.

  4. #34
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    I watch any tradesmen doing work in my house. It is sad because most are honest but there is always one who is not.

  5. #35
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    The outlet should be oriented with the ground pin down because a person grabbing the outlet will have their index finger at the bottom side of the plug and the index finger sticks out further than the thumb. Having the ground down will keep a person's index finger from touching the live pins.
    This is a good argument for having the ground pin up. It might eliminate the genetic traits responsible for people wrapping their fingers into the prongs of a plug.

    Most of them would likely learn after the first time.

    None of my nightlights have a grounding pin or polarized plugs.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #36
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    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    Guess I’m just a meat head..

    No ear protection, eye protection and Incase you can’t tell i was trying to use my mouth as a dust collector lol. Didnt work so well but better than nothing lol.

    We sure do have fun every once in a while.

    F9602492-2860-4AE1-AA02-C16A3A7848B3.jpg

    712AEABD-452C-4DFA-8F81-5CD9BC203E61.jpg

  7. #37
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    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
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    Brazilian crew?

    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    My neighbor is having his roof redone, which includes skinning over the old 1" solid wood underlayment with ply, then purlins on that, and then galvalum. (New code requirement- have to skin with ply if redoing an old roof.) Eight men have been working on this project for over a week. They start early in the morning and spend two hours smoking and yelling at each other, then about an hour of work, much of which is removing the blue tarp. They break during the heat of the day (no criticism for that part- normal for roof work) and come back. Two more hours of smoking and yelling at each other, then an hour or so of work, most of which is putting the blue tarp back on. They wear no hearing protection as they cut galvalum with circular saws. It is so loud that literally as I write I am wearing hearing protection- inside my house. I feel so bad for these guys' ears. Right now they have the ply and purlins up after well over a week of work for 8 men. Well- technically 7 men and one woman, but all she does is cuss and complain to the men. I'm assuming she is some sort of supervisor. She has quite a mouth on her. She is very talented at combining multiple words, very similar to the German language, except with greater vulgarity.

    Meanwhile, the other neighbor has two old West Indian guys that in the same amount of time have completely replaced the roof on their detached building, built and painted a trellis connecting the two buildings, scraped and painted the smaller of the two buildings, and replaced some shutters. These poor guys worked through the heat of the day. My kitchen porch almost touches their roof, so I kept giving them water. These men have no vehicle. They show up at 7AM tools and ladder in hand, and work until dusk.

    Quite the contrast.
    You described perfectly the standard Brazilian crew at work. Feel blessed as (yet) you have some old school alternatives...

  8. #38
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    I don’t know but here in the Boston area Brazzillians in the trades have a very good reputation for being very hard workers. It has bee my observation and oppinion that more often than not the Brazilian next to the white guy is a far harder, more willing and in the last ten years often more skilled.

    Once upon a time in the trades Brazilians would had held low skill jobs in the trades. Now I see 9 outs ten times the best trim carpenters are brazzillian.

    I for one would hire a Brazilian over the average white guy hands down bar non any day without hesitation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Osvaldo Cristo View Post
    You described perfectly the standard Brazilian crew at work. Feel blessed as (yet) you have some old school alternatives...

  9. #39
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    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    The average Brazillian in the states had the skills to earn enough in Brazil to buy a ticket to the states and he had enough confidence in his skills to risk the money and come to the states to earn better wages. The ones who could not do well enough to buy a ticket or risk coming are still there in Brazil.
    In the San francisco are the Brazil room is a well known wedding venue. Made of tropical hardwoods to showcase the lumber from Brazil for the 1939 worlds fair it was taken down and moved to a park in Berkeley California around 1940. Never been inside just peeked in the windows. Quite a showcase of timbers inside. No idea if the exterior wood is special or just old growth redwood.
    Bill D.
    https://www.herecomestheguide.com/no...brazilian-room
    https://www.ebparks.org/activities/corpfamily/br/

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    I don’t know but here in the Boston area Brazzillians in the trades have a very good reputation for being very hard workers. It has bee my observation and oppinion that more often than not the Brazilian next to the white guy is a far harder, more willing and in the last ten years often more skilled.

    Once upon a time in the trades Brazilians would had held low skill jobs in the trades. Now I see 9 outs ten times the best trim carpenters are brazzillian.

    I for one would hire a Brazilian over the average white guy hands down bar non any day without hesitation.
    Probably the best ones were exported. Here remains 99% the crap of crappiest... Ok, 1% is saved...

  11. #41
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    Wow. Look at this. Wavy at all the overlaps, and instead of bending at the wall transition, they added another course. Wind will get under that for sure. Old homes here are built with the roof dovetailed into the wall. The rafters end at the inside edge of the wall, leaving a bend for the last 18” or so at the edge over the flat of the wall. I believe it also aids in holding the roof down in high winds at the wall join. You’re supposed to bend the sheathing over that- not make a new course. Over three weeks now and they are still not done. Look at that ridge cap. This is a FEMA crew. Again- not my house or this would have ended before it began.

    B1391BCA-D4D8-40E7-8544-4286A0E3FC83.jpg

  12. #42
    Ugh, that roof looks horrible, like something you'd see in a shanty town in a 3rd world country. Worse, actually, because in a 3rd world country you expect that & they are doing the best with what they have.

    Does the neighbor have a clue?

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Ugh, that roof looks horrible, like something you'd see in a shanty town in a 3rd world country. Worse, actually, because in a 3rd world country you expect that & they are doing the best with what they have.

    Does the neighbor have a clue?
    No- he knows nothing about construction.

    By the way- this was a US crew that came down here to do the work. All statesiders.

  14. #44
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    Maybe you could surreptitiously record them standing around doing nothing before they get in to doing the shoddy work and send it to an interested member of Congress or someone in the island's government.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  15. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie Moriarty View Post
    You think that's bad, Malcolm? The woman who is installing bead board paneling in our bathroom has cut one 48x46-1/2" piece then, without even installing it, suddenly stopped and walked out of the bathroom, went to another room, turned on the ceiling fan and sat down at the computer. Right now she's typing this message. Talk about worthless!
    Is she worth what she's getting paid?

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