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Thread: upsize motor on Laguna lathe

  1. #16
    Have you looked at the Robust Scout? It is a powerful lathe with outstanding features in a compact size. I turn on one, Carl Jacobson turns on one, and many other professional turners do as well. For many folks I know it fit all the right marks as the last lathe they would ever buy. They aren't budget machines but they are easily the best and you don't ever need to upgrade.

    14" sing inboard, 21" outboard
    26" between centers, 42 with extension
    1 1/2hp 120v
    stainless steel bed
    premium tooling included
    safety 'off' pressure bar
    huge premium bearings
    hardened spindle
    excellent banjo and tail stock
    100% American Made - including the motor
    7 year head to tail warranty
    Stuart Kent
    Founding Director
    the North Carolina Furniture School
    Ayden, North Carolina

  2. Just FYI, lathes with VFD’s don’t like GFCI outlets. The inverter will cause a fault to be read by the GFCI outlet, and trip, so always use standard plug in for a lathe with electronic speed control.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  3. #18
    Stuart,
    thanks for the input. Oh yeah...Iíve looked at the entire Robust line. I have considered the Scout but i would be into it for $4500 + after the lathe and stand. Since I am a rank beginner, Iím thinking of getting my feet wet with something less expensive to start. I want to see if turning is really something I end up loving. If so, I also want to figure out if a midi size will do everything I want to do or if I need to go larger. Who knows... I might fall in love with the craft and end up with a midi AND a full size that I use a lot. If that turns out to be the case, the Robust offerings will definitely be a consideration.

    Roger, thanks for the further info on the potential issues with the GFCI. This could indeed be an issue with the current setup in my shop. I do have a 120v drop directly from the sub-panel to a duplex receptacle in my shop. I have an electric cord reel plugged in there, but the receptacle on that reel is GFCI. I will need to remember to plug into the other available port in that to have non-GFCI. Another reason for me to prioritize my electrical upgrade.

    Thanks, guys.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
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    A tabletop Nova might also meet your needs. Some love them. I think they are kinda pricey for what they are, but it is an option to consider. I don't think they would have the GFCI issue either.

  5. #20
    Tom,
    I've looked at the Comet II a bit, but kind of gravitated from there to the Laguna Revo 12-16 because of the outboard capability, the HP increase and the VS display. The Revo would be more expensive though and would be susceptible to the GFCI issue. I am resolved to make non GFCI power available to whatever lathe I purchase and I can do that with my current power available.
    if I go larger Without 220v, I will also entertain the Saturn or Galaxy DVR offerings from Nova. I have the Nova drill press and I like it. I will say, however, that the concerns that people have expressed about the potential for having to replace the entire DVR head does come into my mind and possible buying decision. Also, from my experience with my Nova drill press, there are a lot of cool features, but also a lot more button pushes than with more conventional lathes... even the VS models.

    lots to think about. Thank you for all of your advice and input on things to consider.

    Dean

  6. This is a high end benchtop, with big lathe features, and it is in use in some of the furniture schools, and every review I've heard about this lathe is superb. You might want to take a serious look at this because it may be just the ticket for what you want and serve you well for many years in the future! It is the Harvey T-40 and is made by the same company that makes the Powermatic lathes.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  7. #22
    Although I have not seen the Harvey T-40 in person, it appears to have great features and an excellent lathe. However, I do think it is primarily for those that need a bench lathe. At $2900 shipped, it is not cheap and that kind of money will buy the Laguna Revo 1836 2hp. The shorter length could be a real issue for certain turnings, and though the headstock pivots, I donít see any way to support a toolrest without some sort of outboard toolrest setup. There may be accessories available to accommodate that, but I havenít researched that. In short, while seemingly a great lathe, unless floor space is an unavoidable issue, I wouldnít go that route.

    I admit as a very satisfied owner of the 1836 I am biased. With the potential to add the bed extension mounted low, one has a 32Ē swing. My turning interests have evolved and are now widely varied. I canít see me ever wanting another lathe.

    Just my thoughts.

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  8. Another to consider is the Jet 1640EVS. There is a great deal going on them right now at various places for about $2070.00. It is 1.5 hp, and it is a great lathe. They also have a good sale price on the Jet 1221vs (midi) which is also a great lathe. Jet has a 5 year warranty on the lathes.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by John Keeton View Post
    Although I have not seen the Harvey T-40 in person, it appears to have great features and an excellent lathe. However, I do think it is primarily for those that need a bench lathe. At $2900 shipped, it is not cheap and that kind of money will buy the Laguna Revo 1836 2hp. The shorter length could be a real issue for certain turnings, and though the headstock pivots, I don’t see any way to support a toolrest without some sort of outboard toolrest setup. There may be accessories available to accommodate that, but I haven’t researched that. In short, while seemingly a great lathe, unless floor space is an unavoidable issue, I wouldn’t go that route.

    I admit as a very satisfied owner of the 1836 I am biased. With the potential to add the bed extension mounted low, one has a 32” swing. My turning interests have evolved and are now widely varied. I can’t see me ever wanting another lathe.

    Just my thoughts.
    Just as you mention there are additional accessories, like a bed extension and stand available for this lathe. For a person who may not have any floor space available in their small shops, and still want a fine benchtop lathe that will serve them well, and have flexibility to upgrade, this is a great option, and it is a bit pricey, but has the same build quality as the Revo 18/36 and the Powermatic.......same company makes all three brands, plus the flagship Grizzly G0800, and other models like their G0799 and G0835.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  10. #25
    Roger, interesting that you mention the Harvey T-40. I looked at that one because it jumped out at me on the Woodcraft site as being, by far, the most expensive midi sized lathe on their site... itís up there with the Canadian made Oneway, which seemed unusual because of it being an Asian import. There are some things I really liked about it and I will do some more digging to educate myself on it.

    Stuart, one of the videos I saw on the Harvey had you reviewing it. Sounds like you have been pretty impressed with it in its use at the furniture school. Is that still the case? Itís pretty darn expensive compared to other imports of similar size... is it an apples-to-oranges comparison with the likes of the Laguna, Nova, etc?

    Dan, Iíll take a look at the Jet 1640... I donít think Iíve looked at it much yet. I did some looking at the 1221, but Iíll be honest...the reviews that showed the issues with the tool rest clamp (grub screw) kinda turned me off. Right or wrong, that one thing really looked like a major weakness that had me looking elsewhere.

    again, thanks all for such generous input and advice. If I counter any of your suggestions with any objection, itís really just to invite more input and personal experience and not meant to discount your suggestion. Admittedly, ALL of my opinions at this point are based on gut feel and othersí reviews. No hands-on so take that for what itís worth.

    thanks,

    Dean

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    Each to their own in terms of value. But the Grizzly offers more for a little less money. 22 vs 18 swing, 42 vs 36 bed, 3 vs 2 (or 1.5) HP. Earlier G0766's had some design deficiencies (too tall, banjo, tool rest) that have since been fixed. And lately, there seems to be a number of complaints about Laguna customer service.
    Funny..... I've only seen one minor complaint about Laguna lately compared to a never ending stream of Grizzly complaints....

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    sykesville, maryland
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    232
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry McFadden View Post
    Funny..... I've only seen one minor complaint about Laguna lately compared to a never ending stream of Grizzly complaints....
    Really? I went back 2 years. One Grizzly complaint, two Laguna. And Grizzly probably sells 4 times as many lathes, given the breadth of offerings compared to Laguna. Please show me where there is this
    never ending stream? Further, I've followed Grizzly for years. They almost always get good reviews for customer service. Can't say that for Laguna, even with their very limited product offering. I think the 1836 is a fine lathe. But it's not a better lathe. Just a different one.
    Last edited by tom lucas; 02-16-2019 at 6:20 PM.

  13. Quote Originally Posted by Dean Moldenhauer View Post
    ...

    ...?

    Dan, I’ll take a look at the Jet 1640... I don’t think I’ve looked at it much yet. I did some looking at the 1221, but I’ll be honest...the reviews that showed the issues with the tool rest clamp (grub screw) kinda turned me off. Right or wrong, that one thing really looked like a major weakness that had me looking elsewhere.

    ...

    thanks,

    Dean
    Dean, I have no issues whatsoever with the tool rest clamp on the 1221. As to the 1640evs, it is a great lathe, and right now at a fantastic price. The tool rest clamp on the 1640 is not a grub screw type. It is a clamping mechanism. You will also note in your research of the 1640evs, that it has 3 spindle bearings (two at the nose and one at the rear. I find the horsepower to be plenty. If you have any specific questions about the 1640, please feel free to ask. If you have the space and the cash, you could not go wrong with the 1640. If you deem at a later date, that you want more HP, then if the 1640 is anything like it's predecessor (1642), then it should have a very good resale value.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    1,124
    For someone who has never had a lathe, you sure have made a lot of assumptions about what you want or don't want. What if you don't like it at all? It's different than any other woodworking. It takes a tremendous amount of eye/hand coordination, PLUS some artistic bent as well. Not like sliding something along a fence or jig. It's silly to turn pens, tops, little boxes, and Christmas ornaments on a big 2hp lathe. So start with a mini or midi and learn the skills. Very few turners only have one lathe. No one should start making 18" diameter bowls to learn how to turn anyway.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by John Keeton View Post
    Although I have not seen the Harvey T-40 in person, it appears to have great features and an excellent lathe. However, I do think it is primarily for those that need a bench lathe. At $2900 shipped, it is not cheap and that kind of money will buy the Laguna Revo 1836 2hp. The shorter length could be a real issue for certain turnings, and though the headstock pivots, I donít see any way to support a toolrest without some sort of outboard toolrest setup. There may be accessories available to accommodate that, but I havenít researched that. In short, while seemingly a great lathe, unless floor space is an unavoidable issue, I wouldnít go that route.

    I admit as a very satisfied owner of the 1836 I am biased. With the potential to add the bed extension mounted low, one has a 32Ē swing. My turning interests have evolved and are now widely varied. I canít see me ever wanting another lathe.

    Just my thoughts.

    the Harvey is a superb lathe, and might also be a good choice here. it has a CNC servo motor that is incredibly strong, efficient and quiet. If you need more length, add an extension. There is an outboard support accessory. Harvey is the company that manufactures everything for Laguna, Grizzly, and several others - but the Harvey branded machines are their premium line and have features that are totally unique to their brand.
    Stuart Kent
    Founding Director
    the North Carolina Furniture School
    Ayden, North Carolina

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