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Thread: Planing painted wood

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Planing painted wood

    I have a good amount, +\- 75BF, of 1x6 lumber 96Ē that is painted. Itís 30+ years old and itís likely construction type wood, likely pine as I can see knots through the paint. Iíd like to salvage it. Also, given its age there may be some nice old growth boards in there.

    I know it will ruin my blades, but is there any other risk involved? I plan on holding on it it until itís time for new blades and just running it through. I have a dewalt 735 and Iíve already flipped my blades once. Is there any other risk to my planer other than ruining the blades? Iím not interested in using paint stripper or sanding or anything like that. Thanks

  2. #2
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    If it is old enough, it could be lead-based paint. If it is, planing it will put lead dust in the air. Inhaling lead is very bad for you.

  3. #3
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    Thank you, didn’t even think of that. Even worse now that you say that, I’d bet there are several coats of paint on there too.

    Well, any other ideas for it rather than throwing it away. If I were to say, cut it with a miter saw to make something for outdoor use, does that create enough dust to be dangerous? Just hate to throw it away.

  4. #4
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    I would also worry about embedded nails too. I don't recall when the ban on lead paint was implemented, but I believe it was back in the 70's. Not too sure on that. If the wood is 30ish years old you may be safe, but why take the risk? Construction lumber iis quite inexpensive compared to hardwoods and it may not be worth the risk. But if your like me, I hate throwing any wood away.
    SWE

  5. #5
    Not sure if the paint dust would get ground into the rollers in addition to the other issues others posted. IMO, the juice ain't worth the squeeze. Maybe you can find another use for it.

    My 2 cents.
    Last edited by Ron Citerone; 02-14-2019 at 7:24 AM.

  6. #6
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    If the salvaged is thick enough I use a bandsaw and rip off the painted faces. Sometimes I rip off the top and bottom edges to save the blade a little.
    Aj

  7. #7
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    I would first get a lead paint test stick and test it. If it's lead based paint, just sent it to the landfill.
    If I wanted to get the paint off the surface with a machine, it would be the jointer, and not the planer, I'd use. Same result, but blades and clean up on a jointer are a lot easier than a planer, so is installing and setting a new blade set. That paint is going to get into everything on a planer.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    After checking for lead, I would rent a floor edge sander and some 20 grit disks. HD here in Ottawa, Canada, has them. Once all the paint is removed, you could plane them to get them ready for future projects.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  9. #9
    I would only use that in its current state. It's not worth the effort.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Cutler View Post
    I would first get a lead paint test stick and test it. If it's lead based paint, just sent it to the landfill.
    If I wanted to get the paint off the surface with a machine, it would be the jointer, and not the planer, I'd use. Same result, but blades and clean up on a jointer are a lot easier than a planer, so is installing and setting a new blade set. That paint is going to get into everything on a planer.
    Lead-based paint was supposedly banned in the US in 1978, but some rapscallions may have used leftover cans after that, so you should test. Also test for metal.

    Assuming no lead, the best way of getting the paint off is with a Festool Rotex sander, it's delightfully fast for this sort of thing (do it outside and wear a mask, and hold on tight.) Save the surfacing for later.

  11. #11
    Both of the Borgs carry lead test kits. You may need to ask to find them.

  12. #12
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    The house was built in 1986, so shouldn’t be lead paint. I gave up on the idea but then I cross cut the end ofone board and even though it looks like pine or something it looks a whole lot better than what you buy at the borg now. Now I have to decide what to do again.
    EE4220DC-D8DC-4AA7-AB3C-8CC8B3DB1B03.jpg

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    MT
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    What about a handheld power planer? The one I have has disposable blades. Could get through the paint with that and then run through planer. Is the wood 4/4 or 3/4? Might not be enough there to do a whole lot with if you plane it. Sander might be a better idea if you are really determined to save it.
    Regards,

    Kris

  14. #14
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    It does look good Zac I’d try to salvage it too. Riftsawn pine it’s worth a look.
    Plane it !
    Aj

  15. #15
    Before you get too far, clean up a couple board feet and work with it to make sure you like it enough to do the rest. From the picture, it looks like either vertical grain fir (mostly vertical at least) or one of those hard pines from the South. Both of those woods can be quite hard and not easy to work with. Note that some people really like those woods, but not everyone does.

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