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Thread: Is Titebond III worth it, and can it be your only wood glue?

  1. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    I don't think I've seen mention in this thread of Lee Valley's GF Cabinetmaker's Glue.
    I've never tried it but wondered if anyone else here had any experience with it.
    I used it for a couple of years and never had a problem, when it went to $65.00 CDN for a gal about 7 years ago I gave my head a shake. All in all its just an expensive PVA. While some believe the brown glueline is a bonus, I'm not one of them.

  2. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kee View Post
    I used it for a couple of years and never had a problem, when it went to $65.00 CDN for a gal about 7 years ago I gave my head a shake. All in all its just an expensive PVA. While some believe the brown glueline is a bonus, I'm not one of them.
    You must do an enormous amount of woodwork to buy a gallon of the stuff at a time.
    Chris

    Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening

  3. #108
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    I'm curious what kind of failures people have had with Titebond glue. Regardless of whether it was the original, Titebond II, Titebond II Extend, or Titebond III, it has never failed, even when using it with miter joints. That is why I'm curious about the reported failures.

  4. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    I don't think I've seen mention in this thread of Lee Valley's GF Cabinetmaker's Glue.
    I've never tried it but wondered if anyone else here had any experience with it.
    I recently used a bottle and it was just fine. I only ordered it because I had just opened my last container of glue, it was convenient at the time and I needed a few more shekels on the order to get the free shipping. I'd buy it again if circumstances were similar.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #110
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Brain, was that your piece in FWW this month? Beautiful piece.

    I glued some 1/16" shop sawn rift sawn WO with Better Bond; 2 hours in the vacuum bag. I came back the next morning and found it like this.



    Well that's not good. I made another with what I thought was exactly the right coverage rate, and left it under vacuum for at least 8 hours. For reference, 1 hour is the claimed minimum requirement.




    OK, problem solved. I turned it into a nice little table to go with the adjacent cabinet.



    In less than a year I got a call. At least two of the seams had begun to curl open; not much, but enough that it was obvious and definitely enough for this extremely critical client to complain. Sorry, I never took a picture of it. The house it's in has AC and the owner is anal beyond all reason so it certainly was not subjected to much abuse. I replaced the top with an identical one but glued with Plastic Resin Glue. 4 years later it's still perfect. I've never used PVA glue again with shop sawn veneer. The only reason I tried switching from PRG to PVA was to get faster throughput through the vacuum bag. When that didn't even turn out to be the case for me I had already gone back to PRG before I got the call of the problem. Like I said, I'm glad you haven't had any problems. I know the stuff works with commercial veneer. I just don't think it's a robust product once you move to shop sawn veneer, which is thicker and is sawn, not creped with a knife.

    John
    Yep, I've not had good luck with cold press glue and veneer (let me go further - I've had miserable experience with cold press glue and veneer). For most applications, I'll use Elmer's white glue. If I need a glue without water (because of veneer expansion) I'll use slow West Systems epoxy.

    I've occasionally used UF glues but I have to mix a lot more than I need because you sure don't want to run out of glue when you're doing a project. And there's the formaldehyde that the glue gives off.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    I'm curious what kind of failures people have had with Titebond glue. Regardless of whether it was the original, Titebond II, Titebond II Extend, or Titebond III, it has never failed, even when using it with miter joints. That is why I'm curious about the reported failures.
    Multiple failures with Titebond Extend using it on cabinet doors with mitered corners. Thought I would try it out to get a little more working time. Big fail, the supposed extended glue time was a joke. Had 2 joints fail before the cabinets were delivered and several more a couple of months after install. Its some of the most expensive glue I've ever used, overall cost me a couple of hundred dollars for a liter. No failures with TB3 because I won't use it, if moisture is going to an issue its epoxy or PL.

  7. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    I'm curious what kind of failures people have had with Titebond glue. Regardless of whether it was the original, Titebond II, Titebond II Extend, or Titebond III, it has never failed, even when using it with miter joints. That is why I'm curious about the reported failures.
    The first time I tested Titebond III was in 2009. It was a new bottle and to me it seemed thin and runny. Glued up 2 scraps in the same way I've always tested adhesives. It broke easily at the glue line with little effort. Not even a bit of the wood gave way only the glue line. I tried again on different scraps, same result. I called Titebond and they said it was a good dated bottle and the thinner viscosity was normal for Titebond III. They told me to return it. I got a new bottle it tested as strong as any yellow PVA glue I'd tested, stronger than the wood. But why did a good dated new bottle of glue fail a test?
    Yearly I'll test my glues before use. Been doing that since I had a job fail mysteriously as a pro 40 years ago. I've been wary of Titebond III since my 2009 test. It's tested OK most years but last month I tested fairly new Titebond III and 5 year old Titebond Extend in the same conditions. The III was OK but it took much less force to break it than the Extend. Only a few slivers of wood came off at the glue line with III. The Extend needed more force and didn't fail at the glue line at all.
    "Whether you think you can, or you think you canít - youíre right."
    - Henry Ford

  8. #113
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    Iíve been reading this thread and the one on Woodweb a while back with interest. I have been using TB 3 for many years and TB 2 before that with no issues. We use TB 3 for everything now because we use a pressurized glue system and too much trouble to change it out. We have always bought it by the 5 gallons. One thing I have noticed is that it is very inconsistent for viscosity. Thick - thin and lumpy sometimes. We always stir or shake up the fives before filling the glue pot.
    I do know if it is ever frozen it is no good and low temps in the shop under 50 f or so will cause chalking and weak joints. We buy the fives from one of our hardwood suppliers and they stock up on it during the summer and leave it in the heated cab of the truck for delivery. We had no issues with TB2 but prefer 3 because we do a lot of face laminating and the TB3 does not move around so much under initial clamp pressure.
    It will fail if submerged under water for a long time. Epoxy is the answer if your wood is subject to this. I used TB 3 for the cores of some skis we made a few years back and they are still going strong. I do know some shops have had issues with glue line failure at high temps.

    I have tried some of the PVAs from Europe and and they seem better quality but the issues of trying to get them here without freezing seems complicated.

  9. #114
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    Joe, I also followed the Woodweb thread with interest. Why do you think your experience with T3 is so different than the numerous anecdotes of failure using it on that thread?

  10. #115
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    No Idea Kevin. Unless it is stirring and shaking the fives before using. Maybe people are getting material that has been frozen. I have a friend that has a larger custom window and door shop east coast and he uses it like we do with no issues.
    The inconsistently bothers me and I think there are better PVAs out there but Tightbond is easy for us to acquire.

    what has been your experience?

  11. #116
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    I really have not used it more than once or twice. The gummy character of the squeezeout indicates its lack of creep resistance, and the fact that it has seriously degraded properties at elevated temps (http://titebond.com/product/glues/e8...c-b53970f736af) makes me nervous.

    For those who are interested the thread in question is on Woodweb's Architectural Woodworking forum entitled "Exterior glue failure- part one" (link not allowed but I think it's okay to give a reference).

    Titebond 2 and Titebond Extend are my go-to ready-mixed glues, but based on Franklin's figures T2 Extend is better for moderate water resistance combined with high temperature bond strength (http://titebond.com/product/glues/21...3-3bff0a0f71ab). T2 Extend is annoying to use though as it separates out on the shelf and requires remixing.

    I generally use epoxy for exterior projects.
    Last edited by Kevin Jenness; 02-22-2019 at 12:05 PM.

  12. #117
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    i still prefer Original Titebond but use 2 and 3 for special exterior circumstances when needed... I do not like the residue on TB 3 when it dries: hard brown...When building furniture , not a pretty sight...The orig blends in easier (translucent)...Just my own experience....
    Jerry

  13. #118
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    At last count, I have four bottles of Titebond. Old dogs tend to be forgetful.

  14. #119
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    " All in all its just an expensive PVA"

    That is true, but all PVA glues are not equal. It is well worth reviewing and comparing the physical characteristics and bond strength data offered by the manufacturer (
    http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/e8d40b45-0ab3-49f7-8a9c-b53970f736af).

  15. #120
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    I had to use some that had froze Saturday. 50 miles to a fresh bottle and a light duty joint, figured it was worth a shot. Looks fine, everything set ok. Not the first time it's happened so curious what you guys see as frozen glue failures?

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