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Thread: Shiny Spots

  1. #1

    Shiny Spots

    I typically wet sand with tung oil but because of the open pore nature of this burl I decided against it. I simply applied Lee Valley tung oil like I usually do, let it sit, then remove excess. I've noticed these shiny spots which I sanded away with 400, then 600 grit abrenet. On the last application I wiped it clean, then blew out with compressed air and wiped clean only to find these circles. Can anyone tell me what's going on and how to avoid it? Thank you.cherry burl.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Fritz View Post
    I typically wet sand with tung oil but because of the open pore nature of this burl I decided against it. I simply applied Lee Valley tung oil like I usually do, let it sit, then remove excess. I've noticed these shiny spots which I sanded away with 400, then 600 grit abrenet. On the last application I wiped it clean, then blew out with compressed air and wiped clean only to find these circles. Can anyone tell me what's going on and how to avoid it? Thank you.cherry burl.jpg
    Hard to tell long distance. It looks like the shiny spots are around fissures that might go deep into the wood. If they are hard and shiny perhaps oil deep in the wood is not fully cured and is slowly seeping out of what look like voids to dry and harden on the surrounding surface. (Compressed air can blow it out too.) If it's from too much oil perhaps a way to avoid it is wipe on the oil sparingly. I don't know how to fix it other than with more sanding. I've had little spots, not circles, on one piece which I treated by "damp" sanding with a finer grit and just a tiny bit of oil wiped on the surface, not enough to get into the voids. But I've never used that oil - I use a "danish" oil so maybe it works differently.

    JKJ

  3. #3
    I think it is called bleed out, and like John said, it comes from oil down in voids that doesn't soak all the way in, and bleeds out back on the surface. The grey synthetic steel wool pads will buff it out. It can go on for a day or three. You should be able to feel them with your finger tips.

    robo hippy

  4. #4
    I always get bleed out around holes and inclusions. If you keep sanding finer, and applying more coats of a finish, eventually everything evens out.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    That's what its called. Learn something new every day. How many coats do you have on? I make sure the very first coat has ample time to completely dry. Seems to lessen that for me. I run at least 8 coast and sanding between, so eventually it does go away as mentioned.

  6. #6
    Thank you all so much. This is the fourth coat.

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