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Thread: Tablesaw injuries

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    47,687
    Part of the challenge with guards is the design of many of the guards. The ideal setup is a riving knife and an over-arm guard so that both through cuts and non-through cuts can be completed without removing the gear. That's not the case with a huge percentage of table saw that are actively being used every day. It's true in my shop, too...the blade guard that came with my particular sliding table saw attaches to the riving knife and therefore, it must be removed for non-through cuts. It's also not clear so it does interfere with sight-lines, although I agree that if a cut is setup properly, it's not necessary to actually "see" the blade making the cut to make the cut, if you catch my drift. When I had a true over-arm guard on my previous saw, it stayed in place 99% of the time. (Of course, that saw didn't have a riving knife...but that was the generation of machinery it came from) I do plan on rectifying this at some point and fortunately, I use my slider such that most of my cuts do not have my hands near the blade and those that do have the fence in the low setting and an appropriate push block/stick in use. I almost never feed material with just my hand. But you know what...despite the care I take, I could still have an incident just like anyone else can experience the same. "Stuff" happens...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,563
    Training in how to perform operations safely is different from safety devices or focus on the task at hand. Each is important to minimizing risk. Deficiency in any is typically when an injury happens.

    People tend to have their minds made up on safety devices, whether guards on their TS or seatbelts in their car. Personally, I will use every one of those devices. Any slight inconvenience during use is more than offset by the reduced risk of a life altering incident.

    John

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    East Virginia
    Posts
    534
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Hi Jacob, I often hear people comment about not being able to see what's happening when using guards.

    I'm not sure why you want to see what's happening? I guarantee the blade is cutting, just like when you use a straight line rip, gang saw or saw with a feeder, you don't have to watch what's happening.
    Hey, Rod. Well, for example, I want to know if the kerf is closing on the blade like a brake caliper so I'll know to expect burning and possible trouble. Or if the workpiece is lifting up away from the blade, same thing. Plastics love to do this...

    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    If you really want to watch, install a proper guard that gives good visibility...........Regards, Rod.
    I guess I'm not up to date on the guards available...kinda learned without guards and it it ain't broke...

    Thanks for your reply.

    J

  4. #34
    I recently bought a new tablesaw it came with all the safety items. This is my first tablesaw that has the spilter and a blade guard. My point is now that I have the safety items. It would make sense to me to at least try to use them. And if I find itís more difficult to use the blade guard. Then I will cross that bridge when I get to it. I am all about safety as is everyone else. I get the impression itís the individuals experience that ultimately decides how to proceed with the task.

  5. #35
    Ps I just got back from Loweís and bought a plastic miter box. I think I will do more by hand when I can.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,563
    Nothing wrong with using hand tools. Everything was made that way at one time, and the work some of those craftsmen turned out is as good as anything ever made with power tools. To augment the miter box you bought, you should go over to the Neanderthal forum and learn about shooting boards. A miter box gets you close; using a shooting board to follow gets you perfection.

    John

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,113
    Hi Jacob, one of my saws (General 650) had a steel and aluminum guard.

    A clear plastic guard will allow you to see what's happening while reducing the risk of injury.

    Although you indicated not to fix what isn't broken, your lack of a guard is a broken approach, it would be good to fix as anything that helps you stay safe and keep working is a good thing

    Regards, Rod.
    Last edited by Rod Sheridan; 02-11-2019 at 4:24 PM.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Northern Oregon
    Posts
    1,566
    I can only go by my own experience.
    At age 8 I was allowed to buy a used table saw if I promised to only run it when someone was home! I said why? Dad said so we can rush you to the hospital if you cut off fingers! Enough said. I now had tremendous respect and curiosity about this powerful tool.
    No one ever showed me how to use it. Never saw someone use one. But I studied the heck out every Popular Mechanics magazine I ever got my hands on. Luckily I've never been hurt by the many table saws I've had in 60 years. Many of those years I was a pro with deadlines.

    "Whether you think you can, or you think you canít - youíre right."
    - Henry Ford

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