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Thread: MAN rated?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    You use that without power feed??
    Not willingly! When properly ground there's way less feed resistance than you'd think. The panel raisers are so easy to use with a power feeder I always do, but often do test set-ups by hand if the head is under the stock. They're reversible so my small machine runs it over top of the stock, the big machine underneath and I'll manually feed on that one. This sucker is MAN rated too.
    Screenshot_20190102-124303_Instagram.jpg
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  2. #17
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    Yeah, it looks intimidating, but I guess light passes are light passes. A jointer is manual.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    I kind of figured it was meaningless, just a few people on here use the term every time shaper cutters are brought up.
    It's not meaningless at all Martin.

    MAN rated tooling has far lower risk of kickback and less energy in the rare instances that a kickback occurs.

    Required by law in many countries, as an employer it would be prudent to purchase that type of tooling, if it's available in the cutter types required.

    Nothing sounds so patently inadequate as the words " I knew there was a safer method of doing this, however I chose not to" when uttered under oath in court or during an incident investigation....regards, Rod

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    It's not meaningless at all Martin.

    MAN rated tooling has far lower risk of kickback and less energy in the rare instances that a kickback occurs.

    Required by law in many countries, as an employer it would be prudent to purchase that type of tooling, if it's available in the cutter types required.

    Nothing sounds so patently inadequate as the words " I knew there was a safer method of doing this, however I chose not to" when uttered under oath in court or during an incident investigation....regards, Rod
    Short of some imported tooling, it's a concept that doesn't exist here in the US.

    The one technical college I'm aware of here that actually trains students to go out and work in production shops (Cabinetmaking and Wood Technology associates degree) teaches how to use and setup lockedge knives as part of the curriculum.

    I could be wrong, but if you called up one of the domestic tooling manufacturers and asked for MAN rated tooling you would get a long silent pause.

  5. #20
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    Aug 2007
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    Dickinson, Texas
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    5,988

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    What does this mean? Been doing this twenty years, never heard the term outside of here.
    Just admit it dude... your afraid it means your not man enough to run that tool. You have to take an aptitude test to even buy MAN rated tooling..
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    Just admit it dude... your afraid it means your not man enough to run that tool. You have to take an aptitude test to even buy MAN rated tooling..
    I keep my MAN rated certificate in my office framed right above my desk for all to see.
    20190207_143709.jpg
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    Short of some imported tooling, it's a concept that doesn't exist here in the US.

    The one technical college I'm aware of here that actually trains students to go out and work in production shops (Cabinetmaking and Wood Technology associates degree) teaches how to use and setup lockedge knives as part of the curriculum.

    I could be wrong, but if you called up one of the domestic tooling manufacturers and asked for MAN rated tooling you would get a long silent pause.
    There are more all the time, but for the most part you're right. CGG Schmitt and Toolstoday sell MAN rated kit, and FS Tools talks about it in their catalogue too and probably others. It's pretty much all I use now and this is what I do for a living.
    Last edited by brent stanley; 02-07-2019 at 5:25 PM.
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    It's not meaningless at all Martin.

    MAN rated tooling has far lower risk of kickback and less energy in the rare instances that a kickback occurs.

    Required by law in many countries, as an employer it would be prudent to purchase that type of tooling, if it's available in the cutter types required.

    Nothing sounds so patently inadequate as the words " I knew there was a safer method of doing this, however I chose not to" when uttered under oath in court or during an incident investigation....regards, Rod
    Try not to get too righteous and carried away. Most professional cabinet makers would very much like to work in a shop like mine. The space, the equipment, and the tooling are far from sub par and it's a far better environment for quality, productivity, health, and safety than ANY place I have been employed. It's an oddity.

    It's not a term I've heard outside of this site. My suspicions were that it's a similar rating like ISO9000 stuff. Pay us a fee, we'll say you're certified, then take your money and use it to legislate the rating into necessity.

    I have no qualms about any of the heads I've got not carrying this rating. They're all as idiot proof as they're going to get. I don't run sketchy garbage.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Canada
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    137
    Well said Martin, doesn't matter what's typed on the cutter or how safe its suppose to be, improper setup and improper use by unskilled/untrained operators will come back to bite you, literally. Darwin always wins.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    I learnt how to use a spindle moulder using slotted collars and hand ground knives. The on/off switch was at floor level. This was so you could
    duck below the level of the table to start the machine in case the knives flew out or hit the deck and shut it down if they went into orbit (as if your reflexes could actually save you anyway). They were held in place solely by the compression force of the spindle nut. Every workshop had shrapnel holes in the wall somewhere with the story to go with it. Fortunately, these have gone and been replaced with better technology and I survived mostly intact. Some of my colleagues did not. There is simply no excuse for not adopting better technology and safer machining practices. Flirt with danger all we want in our own lives, but don't try to normalise it publicly. Cheers
    duck below the
    Every construction obeys the laws of physics. Whether we like or understand the result is of no interest to the universe.

  12. #27
    Wayne, I used those for many years. I'm scared of them only when when nuts are allowed to use them . Biggest two
    problems are useing two knives from different bars of steel ( sizes are just nominal) and constant regrinding of profiles
    to save steel or inability to see how the job can be done with existing profiles.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    431
    This is going to turn into another table saw guard / UK Dado set thread..

    But..

    You can still buy bevel edge or lock edge steel here and use it, in newly (at least the lock edge) manufactured collars.

    Current technical curriculum at the college level
    Last edited by Jared Sankovich; 02-07-2019 at 10:07 PM.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Lomman View Post
    I learnt how to use a spindle moulder using slotted collars and hand ground knives. The on/off switch was at floor level. This was so you could
    duck below the level of the table to start the machine in case the knives flew out or hit the deck and shut it down if they went into orbit (as if your reflexes could actually save you anyway). They were held in place solely by the compression force of the spindle nut. Every workshop had shrapnel holes in the wall somewhere with the story to go with it. Fortunately, these have gone and been replaced with better technology and I survived mostly intact. Some of my colleagues did not. There is simply no excuse for not adopting better technology and safer machining practices. Flirt with danger all we want in our own lives, but don't try to normalise it publicly. Cheers
    duck below the
    Uh huh..... If you can't see danger close on that little engineering marvel, you need to MAN up and give some money to Felder.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    Yeah, it looks intimidating, but I guess light passes are light passes. A jointer is manual.
    The regs actually cover jointer heads too believe it or not! They need to be chip limiting too with things like the Tersa head and others.

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

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