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Thread: how do you store your chuck jaw sets?

  1. #16
    I simply use a magnetic tray
    This enables me to place the tray and the chuck on a workbench then as I change jaw sizes by placing the components of the jaws directly in the tray this prevents me from loosing or misplacing parts

    A small drop of nail varnish on each of the 4 parts of a jaw set enables me to quickly select a different set of jaws

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,278
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Kent View Post
    I've used most of these kinds of things up to now, however I am trying to figure out something for the school. We have in total 20 lathes, each with a chuck, and each chuck has multiple sets of jaws. ...
    In a school situation with lots of the same jaw sizes you might also think of some way to mark each set so a wayward jaw can be easily reunited with its mates if needed, perhaps engrave a code letter/number on each jaw. I don't know if all jaws are made the same way, but the way the some jaws are made a jaw from one set might be a problem if used in a different set.

    Also, most jaw sets I have are numbered on the bottom with stamped 1-2-3-4 while others don't have numbers but dimples made with a punch, (. .. .. ....). To make these easier to see I used a vibrating engraver to write the jaw numbers on the tops.

    I personally don't have any ideas for you for storing multiple sets of jaws in your school situation. I keep the different jaw sets on separate chucks and only change jaws when I need a rarely used set, keeping those quickly accessible in a drawer. The spare jaws go into plastic zip-lock bags in a container on a shelf. It would cost a fortune to equip the school with new chucks for every set but it sure makes things quicker and easier - grab a chuck and go! Maybe a wealthy benefactor will stop in one day...

    JKJ

  3. #18
    thanks all for the suggestions, please keep them coming. We have 20 total chucks, one for each of our lathes at the North Carolina Furniture School. Each chuck has multiple jaw sets, so the solution I am trying to work out here needs to keep all of that tooling organized and accessible for each student station. Ideas like chuck bodies for each jaw set don't work. Additionally, we are designing cabinets for the space below the machines so i want to incorporate them into those cabinets.
    Stuart Kent
    Founding Director
    the North Carolina Furniture School
    Ayden, North Carolina

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,278
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Kent View Post
    ... Additionally, we are designing cabinets for the space below the machines so i want to incorporate them into those cabinets.
    Stuart,

    Earlier you mentioned planning a central rack for the jaws. Storing the jaws in a shallow drawer at each machine might much be better. That would certainly keep individual jaws from getting mixed up with other sets.

    I keep the extra jaw sets laid out in a drawer like that and they are easy to identify and access.

    BTW, I also like shallow drawers right at the lathe for small tools, calipers, hones, hand scrapers, taper shank drill bits, pencils, etc. For example, I make metal handle inserts so I can keep a bunch of tools at hand in a small space in one very shallow drawer. This picture shows my spindle gouges and one of the inserts not yet mounted into a handle.

    insert_spare.jpg

    I don't like anything under the machines except a big tub to catch most of the chips, but in my case several wide, shallow drawers in the workbench just behind me keeps many things within reach. (Small "class" in progress in my shop.)

    WVR_IMG_5458.jpg

    BTW2, I make the inserts from 1/4" to 5/8" diameter from aluminum, brass, and steel. I don't know if it would work for your school, but it's easy to make such an insert from aluminum on the wood late with standard woodturning tools. Perhaps it would be a good exercise for the students, and it's certainly a way to get high-quality handles for almost zero cost. If you are interested I can provide detailed instructions, or the next time I get over that way I'd be glad to stop in and demonstrate (probably June or July).

    IMG_20150420_115245_729_se.jpg finished_small.jpg

    JKJ
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 02-11-2019 at 9:59 PM.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    273
    If you're going to do cabinets then I would go with ones that are on wheels and can be rolled around so the student can put them in a place that feels comfortable while turning. It would also make cleaning up easier and then rolled under the bed (if there's enough room) when not in use. Foam in the drawers cut out in the shape of each jaw, a small clear plastic box with spare screws, and the tools seams like a great idea. It would allow the teacher to quickly look in each drawer to see if something's missing. I would even think about making the top of the cabinet not a drawer but a lid that when opened would have a way of holding all the turning tools.

    The idea would be at the start of the day the student could roll the cabinet out, open up the lid, and place the tools on a rack mounted to the lid (unless they can be stored there). But I'm envisioning the class room is one where the lathes are separated by temporary walls that aren't able to support anything. When the day is done the cabinet would be dusted off, rolled out of the way, and the area cleaned up.

    I know everyone is different but I like to position my body where it feels most comfortable depending on what I'm turning. When doing the inside of a bowl or a platter where I'm not using the tail stock I'll position myself up against the bed. Having cabinets mounted below the lathe could interfere with that.

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