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Thread: Door hinge detail

  1. #1
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    Door hinge detail

    OK, I have a cabinet project where there is a thick leg on each side. To this leg will attach doors (not that heavy, just standard), which are recessed back about 1/2" from the face of the leg. Yes I understand this means it will only swing out 90 degrees.

    So how are hinges attached? I hadnt thought about it, but now realize past projects I have done have hinges attached to a member that is flush (or close to flush) with the front. So mortise for the hinge on both pieces, the 'pin' of the hinge sets proud of the surface, all is good.

    But on this a traditional hinge would need the mortise all the way out to the pin centerline. Maybe this is fine and normal.

    I could add a thin strip to the leg just for the purpose of mounting the hinge to it - thus creating a flush face style. If it was thin it might look ok.

    Pretty sure many of you have done this numerous times. Maybe you all have 27 different ideas/ways to do it (likely). This isnt a masterpiece but still want it to be decent.

  2. #2
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    It would be usual to add a hinge strip between the leg and the door. This wouldn't be terribly thick but it moves the hinge line over enough to allow room for the hinge barrel without burying it into the leg and will let the door swing more than 90°. This display cabinet by Michael Pekovich has the hinge strip attached to the case side so the door is recessed back from the front edge of the case side. If you want, I can check on the plans to see how thick the strip is.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 02-05-2019 at 2:54 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Dave, that is nearly exactly what I was asking. Yes, it would be great to have an idea of what thickness is used in that cabinet.

    I found an example that helps with visually with the question (I see no hinge in this picture!). I wonder if is the same as used in face frame cabinets and swings wide enough to clear the recess...?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
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    Here are some pics of an old computer desk that has a slightly recessed door (only about 3/16"). The door itself is about 5/8" thick. The hinges are the concealed style you mention, and will allow the door to open ~ 100 degrees. Looks like there is an adjustment that might allow the door to be recessed a little further. The brand name on these hinges is "King Slide," which I've never heard of, but I'd assume others make an equivalent hinge.

    Door 1.jpgDoor 2.jpg

  5. #5
    Use Brusso offset pivot knife hinges. I used them on a cabinet that you can see here (second picture down). Hinges are not very visible.

    The advantage of the offset pivot is that the door can abut the side and when you start to open it, the end of the door moves away from the side.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 02-05-2019 at 5:15 PM.
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #6
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    In the photo you posted, they may have used some Euro-style cup hinge. In the cabinet I referred to, Pekovich used a 1/4-in.-thick hinge strip. It's offset 1/4 in. from the front edge of the case side.

    Knife hinges as Mike suggests could also work. Depends on the appearance you are after.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    This was my thought, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    Whidbey Island , Wa.
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    Soss hinges would work as well.


    081BA8AA-29FB-4D67-89E5-4F41534A3753.jpg



    Euro hinges would be the most user friendly hinge mentioned so far.
    Soss hinges and knife hinges can be demanding to install , and there’s vitally no adjustment in the hinge itself.

  9. #9
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    I'd just add the cleat and hang the door on a full overlay European hinge.

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