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Thread: Lowes?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donn Ward View Post
    Regarding Minwax, I won't fall on my sword for their stains, but their wipe on poly is, IMHO, far superior to the WATCO brand. I couldn't find Minwax poly at HD or Lowes so I purchased WATCO. It took 24 hours to dry and it didn't flow out as smoothly as Minwax. I was able to find Minwax at ACE Hardware so I purchased a couple of cans...It went on smoothly and dried within a couple of hours, so I could apply multiple coats in a single day.
    Donn, you can get the Minwax product from any Sherwin Williams store. It's their product.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Orbine View Post
    I thought Lowe's is making a pretty good push with the Craftsman lineup.
    I think it's a good thing also!

    Sounds like Stanley-Black & Decker are trying to bring the USA-Made Craftsman quality back.
    http://www.americanmanufacturing.org...ing-production

    It took a few years of poor quality Craftsman brand products to mess things up, So it's probably going to take some time to get things right again.

    Doug

  3. #18
    I wonder why the big box stores don't try to stock all levels of tools, including the high-end tool brands like hilti, Festool, Knipex, Wera.. hell, even Woodpeckers. It's like if Best Buy wouldn't stock Apple products because they are too expensive.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Shattuck View Post
    I wonder why the big box stores don't try to stock all levels of tools, including the high-end tool brands like hilti, Festool, Knipex, Wera.. hell, even Woodpeckers. It's like if Best Buy wouldn't stock Apple products because they are too expensive.

    Because they don’t sell well enough to warrant keeping invemtory on the shelves in thousands of stores.

    Lowes and Sears in my region used to carry Knipex tools. They didn’t sell many. Nor do they run the kinds of businesses that need to draw you in with the “fancy” tools in hopes of selling off them sending you out the door with the “value” tool. So carrying them is not a useful marketing expense either.

    The name of the game at BORGs is inventory turn. Good looking expensive widgets just sitting on the shelves is not good for the bottom line.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Shattuck View Post
    I wonder why the big box stores don't try to stock all levels of tools, including the high-end tool brands like hilti, Festool, Knipex, Wera.. hell, even Woodpeckers. It's like if Best Buy wouldn't stock Apple products because they are too expensive.
    Most big box customers wouldn't know anything about Festool, Wera etc. beyond that they are overpriced. Some customers would, but not enough.

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Because they don’t sell well enough to warrant keeping invemtory on the shelves in thousands of stores.

    Lowes and Sears in my region used to carry Knipex tools. They didn’t sell many. Nor do they run the kinds of businesses that need to draw you in with the “fancy” tools in hopes of selling off them sending you out the door with the “value” tool. So carrying them is not a useful marketing expense either.

    The name of the game at BORGs is inventory turn. Good looking expensive widgets just sitting on the shelves is not good for the bottom line.
    +1. I was about to say pretty much the same thing. The rapid turnover is part of their big picture business model. I know a hardware store that tried to sell Festool. In a year, they sold very little of it and dropped the brand. (Though I heard somewhere that there is a brick and mortar hardware store behind Hartville Tool and it sells a ton of festool and has a wide variety of "lesser brands". If that's true, maybe their business model is different than a BORG.)
    Last edited by Frederick Skelly; 02-02-2019 at 10:46 AM.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
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  7. #22
    Online shopping has changed the retail store. Fewer choices, higher prices. for instance, you run out of jigsaw blades and need to finish your project you'll take what they have. If you have 2 days you'll order Amazon or some other outlet that carries 99 types of jigsaw blades

  8. #23
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    "Big Box" is also not the sales model for certain brands because of the level of service/support/inventory required to carry the lines as well as constraints on pricing. Many of the "top" brands do not permit discounting, either. Festool, for example, has stringent requirements around all of these things and mass market is not a good fit for that.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mann View Post
    If Lowes marketing people think that "Craftsman" will be perceived as a premium brand in the same league as Dewalt, Bosch, Milwaukee, Makita or even Hitachi, they may be disappointed. I certainly don't see it that way. I consider them to be similar to Ryobi at Home Depot, but higher priced.
    People in this group my not think of Craftsman brand as premium but I would be willing to bet the average homeowner, that the big box store caters to, still look at it as a top brand. I am going to bet it will be successful for Lowes.
    What ever one thinks of the Craftsman brand, Good or bad, kinda has to set that aside and look at each tool now with a different eye. Since Craftsman is now a brand owned by Stanley/ Black and Decker (DeWalt) most tools are totally different so the past is irrelevant.
    "Remember back in the day, when things were made by hand, and people took pride in their work?"
    - Rick Dale

  10. #25
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    Since they sold the brand and make them in China it no longer applies but. Say five years ago I could go into a big box store and they had some invented brand names and some old names that have nothign to do with the original quality products. The Craftsman name meant it was made in North America and was a reasonable quality. It would not fall apart in your hand under load and injure you. Those other brands?
    There is no good way to look at a tool and know if the steel is properly alloyed and heat treated. For that confidence your only choice is to rely on a brand name and decide that a lifetime guarantee means they put some effort into making decent quality or the returns would bankrupt them. Since someone bought the craftsman name they have to honor the existing lifetime guarantees since that is part of the "good will" they paid for.
    Bill D

  11. #26
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    Bill, I strongly suspect that it's been a very long time since the Craftsman named tools en-masse were made largely in North America, even when Sears was still muddling through.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #27
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    I purchased a Dewalt cordless drill and driver set two years ago and have had nothing but problems with the drill (both used in a home/hobby environment). I finally sold the set and replaced it with a new Craftsman drill/driver set two months ago and I couldn't be more happy. Plenty of power, long life on the batteries and they charge very quickly. Build quality appears to be pretty good too.

    The sales person at my local Lowe's said that Stanley-Black and Decker makes the Dewalt (high end), Craftsman (middle) and Black and Decker (lower end) tools. He said that coming soon they will be carrying the Craftsman hand tools with lifetime warranty. He didn't state if Craftsman would be replacing the Kobalt name but I have noticed my local store stocking less and less Kobalt items on the shelves.

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Bill, I strongly suspect that it's been a very long time since the Craftsman named tools en-masse were made largely in North America, even when Sears was still muddling through.
    According to the wikipedia article on "craftsman", they were all(?) sourced in the USA until 2010, but I remember seeing the China label on some of the mechanics tools at least 5 years before that. I have lots of Craftsman mechanics tools from the 70's and 80's, all American-made of course. They were well into the 90's. They always subcontracted. It was never in the same league as Snap-On, but it got the job done, and the warranty was great, particularly for ratchets. The stuff being made now is not quite the same quality as Kobalt, which I hope Lowes is not supplanting. The hot ticket today is GearWrench, better than Craftsman ever was.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 02-02-2019 at 2:59 PM.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    According to the wikipedia article on "craftsman", they were all(?) sourced in the USA until 2010, but I remember seeing the China label on some of the mechanics tools at least 5 years before that. I have lots of Craftsman mechanics tools from the 70's and 80's, all American-made of course. They were well into the 90's. They always subcontracted. It was never in the same league as Snap-On, but it got the job done, and the warranty was great, particularly for ratchets. The stuff being made now is not quite the same quality as Kobalt, which I hope Lowes is not supplanting. The hot ticket today is GearWrench, better than Craftsman ever was.
    We may be having some confusion here with the word "tools", between mechanic tools and woodworking tools in this discussion. Back in the 90s, nearly all machinery was made by Emerson. Sears also started marketing Companion mechanic tools as a cheaper Chinese made choice. Don't know when mechanic tools started being outsourced.

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    We may be having some confusion here with the word "tools", between mechanic tools and woodworking tools in this discussion. Back in the 90s, nearly all machinery was made by Emerson. Sears also started marketing Companion mechanic tools as a cheaper Chinese made choice. Don't know when mechanic tools started being outsourced.
    Craftsman never actually made anything. _Everything_ was outsourced. The mechanics tools were last made by Danaher, but it fluctuated (and Danaher was sold.) Companion was always junky.

    You never knew quite what you were gonna get. Kind of like Kenmore.

    But goshdarnit, whoever was responsible, I thought they made great lawnmowers! Based on a sample size of one every 15 years. Start every time. Everything else I ever tried was trash in comparison.

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