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Thread: Has anyone built the Woodsmith belt sander?

  1. #1

    Has anyone built the Woodsmith belt sander?

    A recent issue of Woodsmith describes making a stationary belt sander (different from a previous one that they powered with a lathe).
    - Has anyone built this?
    - Does it perform well?
    - Cost vs a manufactured one?
    - Pitfalls to watch for in construction?

  2. #2

    belt sander experience

    Quote Originally Posted by David Kenagy View Post
    A recent issue of Woodsmith describes making a stationary belt sander (different from a previous one that they powered with a lathe).
    - Has anyone built this?
    - Does it perform well?
    - Cost vs a manufactured one?
    - Pitfalls to watch for in construction?
    I built it right after the article appeared.
    it performs well, but it took a lot of adjusting to get it to track perfectly to suit me. I built the drill press driven belt sander a few years ago and never had any problems. Same sort of build. I had the two rollers at different heights and I turned the rollers on the lathe. ( this caused the crowns to not be on the same plane, height.) Redid them as they showed on the router table and that really helped.
    the motor is the big cost, if you can find a used one that would really make it cheap. We just moved here to NY from Colorado and I gave two motors away that would have been fine. Even with the new Leeson motor it was Apx 1/2 of manufactured one.

    the rollers need to have the crown in the middle and mounted at the same height vertically. The vertical plane of the driven roller that is coupled to the motor I had canted out of vertical. All in all it worked out to be a good addition.
    It worked ok right away but the belt wasnít evenly positioned on both rollers, that bothered me, and that is what all the tinkering was about. Could have left it and used it that way. If you decide to build it pm me and I will send you the tension springs. Charles

  3. #3
    Here is a list of parts that you will need and some you can make
    need: Bearings. 22.43 ea, Shaft coupling. 44.87, Springs. 15.87. Apx $101.46. + ship. +Motor ? +misc hwd - nuts and bolts, rod. plywood. Etc

    can make: Knurled knobs. 5.90 ea. Hand wheel. 22.37, Studded knob. 13.05 ea Apx $60.28 +ship

    lots of time invested to build but was enjoyable, if you enjoy building things itís ok. Make sure you use a enclosed, dust proof motor

  4. #4
    This was posted on BT, ad from CL 00y0y_8wYDG329qd9_1200x900.jpg00L0L_327v23imAPI_1200x900.jpg01212_4m5Zy7mZMv6_1200x900.jpghttps://kansascity.craigslist.org/tls/d/rayville-big-belt-sander-variable-speed/6870227099.html

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Hennessey View Post
    This was posted on BT, ad from CL 00y0y_8wYDG329qd9_1200x900.jpg
    School me guys? What would you use a belt sander that wide for?
    I don't think thicknessing would its strong suit (would need a set of rollers on top to keep even pressure.)
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  6. #6
    My guess would be to flatten a board. You would need to hold it to apply the pressure. Our local lumber yard in Kansas 50 years ago had a very long belt sander that the board went under and you used a platen to apply pressure. I think it was called a stoke sander. Someone may have a better take on this than me.

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