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Thread: About sharpening handsaws

  1. #46
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    Not being sure what Lowell is trying to get to with his link, here is a link for the Vertas saw file holder:

    http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...=1,43072,43086

    For 9 other items relevant to various other aspects, of which some are related to saw filing, use the Lee Valley search function and type in > saw filing <.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #47
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    Yes, I had searched for a sink awhile back. Looks like the link loads a cookie for the last search the user made on the LV site.

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Greg Jones View Post
    Yes, I had searched for a sink awhile back. Looks like the link loads a cookie for the last search the user made on the LV site.
    That was my suspicion when your clicking the link came up with sinks and mine came up with drawknives. A recent search of mine was for drawknives.

    Since the thread is about handsaw sharpening my best guess was Lowell was trying to send search results for the saw file holder, which didn't quite work.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #49
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    Well, I know Lowell knows a bunch and I want to pick his brain, I guess we'll have to wait on that one. I do have the Veritas saw file holder, good tool.

  5. #50
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    The site shows a collection of saw sharpening tools. I have many of them and they work.

  6. #51
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  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Winners View Post
    Well, I know Lowell knows a bunch and I want to pick his brain, I guess we'll have to wait on that one. I do have the Veritas saw file holder, good tool.
    One good site for information about saw sharpening is:

    http://www.vintagesaws.com

    Click on the 'Library' saw to get to the tutorial on sharpening a hand saw.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #53
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    It was supposed to be a Paul Sellers site.

    I learned to sharpen saws at Homestead Heritage in Waco Texas in one of his classes. He is not there anymore,
    but Frank Straza is as good as Paul.

    https://www.homesteadheritage.com/
    Last edited by lowell holmes; 07-17-2019 at 6:23 PM.

  9. #54
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    In post 42 this thread are a couple pictures of a 26" Disston and sons stamped 6 and filed freaky crosscut.

    I want to refile it 6 point crosscut, put however many dowels into the tote it takes to feel confident, and give it enough fleam and set to work well in green softwood.

    Would that be disrespectful (sinful?) to the history of the tool?

    Pictured is a 28" and sons stamped 5 and filed rip with 10 degrees of horizontal fleam and 20 thousandths of set on it. If Leonard Lee knew what he was talking about, and I find he did, this should be a mighty fine rip saw in green softwood (it is) that doesn't trip over minor variations in grain pattern. This is going to be my rip saw for timber framing tenons and it is other than derusting and sharpening very very close to how I found it.

    Below that is the an sons I am asking about, 26", stamped 6, that I want to make into a crosscut for green softwood. It wasn't too long ago Ken Hatch had a kinda sort of philosophical thread going about "what do you want to build in your shop?" Ken wants to make work benches. I want to try my hand at a timber framed building, starting with a 12x16 foot shed.

    Below that is my set measuring tool. I tried a pair of stair nuts and that didn't work. Consistently. I could get "a number" with the stair nuts on the micrometer, but when I came back the next day I would almost always get a different number. I think machinists call these add-ons to a micrometer anvils. I already had one of the red doo-hickeys that said Hornady on it, I went to the sporting goods store and got another one. They are for making small holes close together way far away. US$ 40-50 for a pair of them in Fairbanks. What I am measuring is the thickness of the plate adjacent to the teeth, and the width of the set at the tips of teeth- and expressing my measurement of set in thousandths of an inch.

    So what do you think? The 26" and sons I own, stamped 6, has a freaky hand file job on it that works terrific on firewood. Somebody with experience filed that thing. I don't need a firewood saw. I do need a hefty saw filed crosscut for green softwood to try my hand at timber framing. Can I put it back closer to factory filing without risking an eternal lake of fire? Thanks.

    greensoft.jpg

  10. #55
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    Unless it's just the lighting, it looks like you're going to have to joint it down pretty good anyway, so might as well try something that you want. With big toothed crosscut saws, it's always a compromise between speed, and how clean the shoulder is.

  11. #56
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    Another easy way to measure set is to use feeler gauges in the saw kerf.

    If your saw has too much set fold a few pieces of your printer paper over the tooth line and smash it in a vise. You may want to reset the teeth after this.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #57
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    I think I have decided that if I can duplicate the grind I will not be destroying it when I file the blade. So here you go, old timer's firewood crosscut saw.

    firewood.jpg

    36 degrees of rake. 36. Whoever heard of thirty six degrees of rake? No wonder this thing starts easy on tree bark. 38 degrees of horizontal fleam. Zero vertical fleam. Notice the gullet floors all lay on the same line from both sides of the saw. About 10 thousandths of set, average. This thing has been sharpened many times. It is likely in my lifetime if I build a timber frame retirement home I will probably start cutting in to the factory stamped 6 on the heel of the blade with my sharpening file. By my measure the actual set on the blade varies from nothing to about 20 thousandths, average over the length of the blade, 10 thousandths on a 0.035 plate.

    The other thing is the tooth profile. This was pen-ultimately filed with I don't know which file, maybe a 7" slim or 7" extra slim. Something I don't own yet - but the last time it was filed was with a 7" regular which I do own and that accounts for the freakish shape of the teeth- using a fatter file for what had been done before by a skinnier file.

    And the tote is nearly toast. I think this saw will last longer since I have gotten into it. I have so far at least 5 pieces of 1/8" poplar dowel secured with TiteBond 2, at least three to go after what I have done is dry. I am considering immersing it in BLO mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits rather than just applying shellac, this one is really really dry all the way through.

    fiveandtrhee.jpg

    I haven't modified the blade yet, I'll check back tomorrow before I toss the haggis in the fire.

  13. #58
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    Scott; if your measuring a 36* rake angle, its likely some loose goose has filed that tooth pattern backwards.
    Last edited by Stewie Simpson; 10-01-2019 at 10:10 AM.

  14. #59
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    There is nothing worth duplicating about that tooth geometry. I expect it was originally a rip saw.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stewie Simpson View Post
    Scott; if your measuring a 36* rake angle, its likely some loose goose has filed that tooth pattern backwards.
    Which I did when I jointed and reshaped the saw. First time through I was going for 20 degrees of rake, created 40 degrees of rake. it started real real easy on round pieces of tree with the bark still on, and on the pull stroke it cut pretty good. Not your fault, but I snorted when I realized what I had done.

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