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Thread: Carcass Saw - LN or LV?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lawrence View Post
    I love this forum. OP made his decision hours ago. The rest of us will be discussing it for days.
    Ha. This is true of every forum.
    However, Lie Nielsen emailed me and they're out of stock.
    So...I may have a week or two to change my mind.


    Also, I do have some vintage saws. None of them are carcass saws, and I wanted to try a new one. Shrug.

  2. #17
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    Feb 2016
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    Edmonton, Alberta
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    I have both. I prefer the LN (thin plate) by far - the Veritas arrives with a less aggressive rake, which makes it easier to use for a beginner. Of course that can be changed. The LN looks a lot better and the thin plate saws cut much faster and cleaner. In fact I prefer my LN carcass saw to my Bad Axe tenon saw, just to address the comments about premium saws being much better.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hasin Haroon View Post
    I have both. I prefer the LN (thin plate) by far - the Veritas arrives with a less aggressive rake, which makes it easier to use for a beginner. Of course that can be changed. The LN looks a lot better and the thin plate saws cut much faster and cleaner. In fact I prefer my LN carcass saw to my Bad Axe tenon saw, just to address the comments about premium saws being much better.
    I don't understand why LN don't offer the option of 0.025" saw plate gauge within their range of backaws.

    To be specific, 0.025" would have been a far better option imo on their 16" Tenon Saw (3 3/4" depth of cut). Alas, they chose 0.032".
    Last edited by Stewie Simpson; 01-29-2019 at 5:06 AM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Virginia
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    814
    Might check the classifieds. Fellow there with some LN stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan Johnson View Post
    Ha. This is true of every forum.
    However, Lie Nielsen emailed me and they're out of stock.
    So...I may have a week or two to change my mind.


    Also, I do have some vintage saws. None of them are carcass saws, and I wanted to try a new one. Shrug.

  5. #20
    I was standing at the Lie Nielsen table at the Williamsburg conference a week and a half ago, when a fellow I did not know asked if I thought a saw was kind of dull. So I tried it out. It did cut slowly like it was dull. I looked at the teeth; it had a lot of rake and was filed crosscut and I told him that was why it cut slowly.

    It was a weird saw: fourteen inches long and maybe two inches wide with small teeth. I know from reading this thread that this is what they call a "carcass saw". Usually 14 inch saws have somewhat larger teeth, a plate over two inches and are called sash saws.

    A more traditional carcase saw is about eleven inches long and filed rip. The heavy back on the Lie Nielsen saw accented the fact that it was over long. I think it was slower cutting than my eight inch dovetail saw.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    You had better Malcolm. Good hand saw sharpening is hard to find & expensive. Gone are the days when Tom Law would sharpen all the saws I sent him for $10 per saw. Tom Cianci ? ďthe saw doctorĒ is so backed up he stopped accepting new saws this past summer. Kennebec saws has a long waiting list & at least a 3 month wait. He does good work but you can pay on average $75 or more plus shipping. To some on this forum saw sharpening is no different in difficulty than sharpening a plane blade. But remember, some of us practiced a long time & tried several methods before we got that reliably reproduceable razor edge. Even Mike Dunbar, one of the finest hand tool wizards, sent his saws out. ( see pic from his book ). I suspect the majority of handsaws sold are never resharpened. They are used a bit, get dull, and the owner looks at a disposable Japanese saw or a more expensive American saw or goes to the bandsaw or table saw. That is a guess on my part. Thoughts?Attachment 402234
    Most of the Home Depot kind of saws these days are high temper Japanese pattern- hard to sharpen and cheap to replace. When I tell someone with a western saw that I can sharpen it, they usually look amazed. They also are amazed when I discuss how they use the saw so I can tune it for them. Itís quickly becoming a lost skill.

    I charge $10, but for now I am not looking to do mail order sharpening. Iím pretty busy with local chef knives and planer knives. $25 is high to me unless it includes shipping.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
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    1,095
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Mickley View Post
    I was standing at the Lie Nielsen table at the Williamsburg conference a week and a half ago, when a fellow I did not know asked if I thought a saw was kind of dull. So I tried it out. It did cut slowly like it was dull. I looked at the teeth; it had a lot of rake and was filed crosscut and I told him that was why it cut slowly.

    It was a weird saw: fourteen inches long and maybe two inches wide with small teeth. I know from reading this thread that this is what they call a "carcass saw". Usually 14 inch saws have somewhat larger teeth, a plate over two inches and are called sash saws.

    A more traditional carcase saw is about eleven inches long and filed rip. The heavy back on the Lie Nielsen saw accented the fact that it was over long. I think it was slower cutting than my eight inch dovetail saw.
    I have one of those carcass saws. It's filed 14PPI crosscut. I think it cuts well given the tasks I use it for. If I want a fast aggressive cut I use a D8.
    It's wood dust. Saw dust would suggest a problem.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
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    417
    Quote Originally Posted by Stewie Simpson View Post
    I don't understand why LN don't offer the option of 0.025" saw plate gauge within their range of backaws.

    To be specific, 0.025" would have been a far better option imo on their 16" Tenon Saw (3 3/4" depth of cut). Alas, they chose 0.032".
    Stewie, LN offers a tapered 16 inch tenon saw with a saw plate of .020 inches. Although at first the saw feels a bit unwieldy at 16”, it cuts tenons like a knife thru butter.

  9. #24
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    Aug 2007
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    Dickinson, Texas
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    Come on guys, everyone knows we have to have one of each.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Forest Lake MN
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    292
    I have 3 veritas saws and they were a good starter kit. The LN saws look pretty nice and if I had no saw today and was buying one I might go that route. It would not surprise me if they were worth the extra $ but it would surprise me if it was worth it to upgrade from a veritas. That said eventually a Bad Axe will likely find its way into my shop, very likely a Bayonet with the hybrid filing.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Minnesota
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    211
    After I placed my order I received an email that the carcass saw was out of stock and wouldn't be available for a week or two.
    Then, two days later I had a shipping confirmation. I doubt they rushed production for me.
    Anyway, the saw arrived today and I quite like it. It's prettier in person than in the photos.
    I figured I needed a shiny new shop appliance to use with my new toy, so made a bench hook.

    20190202_200608.jpg

  12. #27
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    Longview WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    See this site

    https://www.google.com/search?biw=12...mg.cYzn2LEXQeM

    I would buy both of them.
    Both of what? The link came up with a page of a few hundred saws:

    Dovetail Saws.jpg

    I figured I needed a shiny new shop appliance to use with my new toy, so made a bench hook.
    Over time you may see my reason for making bench hooks in pairs.

    Saw with Bench Hooks.jpg

    It helps to hold and support longer pieces.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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