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Thread: Would this be a good table Saw?

  1. #1
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    Would this be a good table Saw?

    Would this be a good home use table saw? I was thinking to replace the 3 phase motor with a single phase 240 volt and of course clean it up.

    Does anyone know what brand it might be, The nameplate is missing.
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  2. #2
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    Looks like a chopped up and put away soaking wet Unisaw. Guessing Uni based on the oval motor opening, not much else to go on.

    Lots of negatives on the saw though:
    Frame and plinth have been cut, I mean butchered.
    Missing parts galore
    Multiple feeder mounts says to me itís been around the block a few dozen times.
    Who knows what else given the little information.

    Iíd put a VFD on it before replacing the motor, but to each their own. Then again, Iíd pass on that saw.

    Edit: fence is makeshift too, looks like aluminum angle and mdf.
    And thatís a creative blade guard.
    Last edited by Matt Day; 01-26-2019 at 9:44 PM.

  3. #3
    Do you know what size blade fits this saw? My guess is old Powermatic.

  4. #4
    I wouldn't pay over $75 for it as it sits. Unless you have a motor you are going to make a sizeable investment in a motor, starter, cord, plug and then have labor to clean it up and get it running. Make sure the arbor nut is there and freely moves. They can be a bear to replace.
    Lee Schierer
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  5. #5
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    Did PM ever make a right tilt? My guess is a 12-14 Delta Rockwell.

  6. #6
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    Could be wrong but it looks like one of many imports that flooded the US market in the early to mid '80's.

  7. #7
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    I think Dick is right ,12-14 Rockwell. Beat to heck.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Day View Post
    Looks like a chopped up and put away soaking wet Unisaw. Guessing Uni based on the oval motor opening, not much else to go on.

    Not a Unisaw because the opening for the blade insert is not oval. it is a rectangle. I believe both Rockwell and Powermatic 12" saws have a rectangular insert for the blade.
    Bill D.

    On Edit; not a Powermatic, blade insert is on wrong side. could be delta/rockwell
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-27-2019 at 4:01 PM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  9. #9
    I knowledgeable friend once gave me some advice about restoring old cars. He said "Let someone else do the restoration and then buy it restored. You'll come out cheaper." I think that applies to old woodworking tools, also.

    Of course, in both cases if you enjoy the restoration work, do it yourself.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  10. #10
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    I haven't actually seen it in person yet (over an hour drive).
    I have a 5hp single phase motor it is clockwise rotation viewed from the shaft end (non reversible) Is that the correct rotation?

    I plan to go look at it this week. I will check arbor dia. and rust in the gears.
    How hard and expensive is bearing replacement?
    sounds like it would have to be around $100 or less to even be worth it. He is asking $200.

    Steve

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Bandirola View Post
    I haven't actually seen it in person yet (over an hour drive).
    I have a 5hp single phase motor it is clockwise rotation viewed from the shaft end (non reversible) Is that the correct rotation?

    I plan to go look at it this week. I will check arbor dia. and rust in the gears.
    How hard and expensive is bearing replacement?
    sounds like it would have to be around $100 or less to even be worth it. He is asking $200.

    Steve
    Rotation is easily changed, but there is more than that to be concerned with. You need the right frame, shaft size & RPM.

    Personally, I wouldn't take on that project even if it was free. By the time you get it operational & reasonably safe, you'd spend as much as you would on a very decent brand new, with warranty, contractor saw that would work much better in a home shop environment.
    Last edited by Frank Pratt; 01-28-2019 at 11:08 AM.

  12. #12
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    Itís hard to turn down a machine you are excited about, but just because itís $200 doesnít mean itís a good buy.

  13. #13
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    I'd pass on it, too. I agree that it looks like a really beat up Delta 12/14" table saw, which is an oversized Unisaw. It's missing a lot of parts. Unless you REALLY need a 12" saw and have some experience in rebuilding old equipment, $200 isn't a particularly good deal for this thing. I have a 12/14 which I paid considerably more than that for, and I tore it completely down and restored it, and it's a great saw, but it was all intact when I started.

    Replacing the bearings isn't generally difficult, but you'll want to take the top off, and the top is VERY heavy (two or three man heavy) even after you remove the wings, and the wings are pretty heavy too. The motor will be very heavy and cumbersome, too. A shop crane/engine hoist/cherry picker is almost mandatory for rebuilding this saw. The arbor on these saws can be beat up, and they're generally no longer available, and they are 1" so if you already have a saw with 10" 5/8" bore blades, you'll need new blades, too.

  14. #14
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    Thank you everybody, based on the advise here I will pass.
    A big iron table saw is just so attractive though.

  15. #15
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    Used woodworking machinery is at a price now where it would be silly to buy a dog like that saw. When the market was at it's peak from the late 70s to early 90s, some people had to buy machines like that. Now there are a lot of baby boomers downsizing or the ultimate downsizing of dying, that the used market is steadily dropping.

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