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Thread: What is a "rule of six" breaker box?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    211
    Also in NW PA and have a newer service was installed 6 years ago. It has a large panel integrated with the meter. That panel has two 100 amp breakers and is the one with the grounding. It only has two breakers in it. One feeds a sub in the house and the other feeds my workshop in a separate building. My workshop sub also required grounding, but I can't remember the reason (distance maybe?).

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,374
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Also in NW PA and have a newer service was installed 6 years ago. It has a large panel integrated with the meter. That panel has two 100 amp breakers and is the one with the grounding. It only has two breakers in it. One feeds a sub in the house and the other feeds my workshop in a separate building. My workshop sub also required grounding, but I can't remember the reason (distance maybe?).
    It's actually a code requirement to ground the panels at separate buildings.
    The reason is to establish ground. I know that you are "carrying ground" back to the main service panel, via the wiring, but the ground reference at both locations will now be the same.
    Every single transition point along the distribution route from the 345KV output of the turbine generator, to your light switch, is always referenced somehow or the other to earth ground
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 08-11-2019 at 9:25 AM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  3. #33
    In our area the exterior disconnect is what the fire company wants....

    I do electrical work. Three years ago I changed out an old
    electrical box. The company name was (The Breaker Box)...
    It was confusing. Each breaker could provide both 120 or
    220 volts. I keep the box just to show other electricians what
    it looks like.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    737
    In New England we had 15 amp 240 volt services. You get 4 - 15 amp 120 volt circuits out of it and of course that adds up to more than the service is supposed to provide. I think the theory was that you would rarely load up all 4 circuits and if you did, there being no main fuse, it delivered up to the capacity of the four 15 amp fuses. With very few if any heat generating devices it was enough for lighting. A well pump was challenging.

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