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Thread: Veritas Pocket Plane use

  1. #1

    Veritas Pocket Plane use

    Anyone have any user experience with this (Veritas Pocket Plane) small block plane?



    How does it compare to the Veritas and LN Apron Planes?



    http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...,48942&p=76879
    Last edited by Kevin Hampshire; 01-20-2019 at 3:01 PM.

  2. #2
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    It does not move me at all. I am a Lee Valley fan, but pocket planes are not something I want.

  3. #3
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    Kevin, How often do you reach for a block plane?

    Do you wear a shop apron while working?

    To me this plane would be very useful. Just like the five others that are capable of doing what this plane does.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
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    I bought this plane when it was first introduced last year. Didn’t really need it but the size and looks attracted me. I used it mainly to chamfer legs and other parts of a small table I was finishing. I’ll say right now that I also own the Lie-Nielsen 102 block plan that I’ve had since the late 90’s and the Veritas plane pretty much duplicates what the LN plane does. In fact the chamfering on that table was started with the 102 and then the Veritas model was delivered so I then put it to work.

    I don’t wear an apron for woodworking so the pocket idea does not apply for me. But it is a nice little plane and the PM V-11 blade is certainly nice. If you don’t already have a small block plane this could be a good purchase but for me it was an unnecessary but nevertheless interesting purchase. I’ll probably hang on to it.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Hampshire View Post
    Anyone have any user experience with this (Veritas Pocket Plane) small block plane?
    That pocket plane fills a WANT, not a need, unless you do miniature or instrument (guitars e.g) stuff. It is not as useful as an apron block or block plane, because of its small size. Try using it to level inlay string work, and you will love your block or apron plane a lot more!

    The blade is smaller, and so make sure you have the necessary sharpening skill, done mostly freehand, I'd say.

    If you are looking for your first small plane, the apron plane (or the block, if it is not considered too big) is a better choice, whether or not you wear an apron.

    Simon

  6. #6
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    I use a small block plane at various stages of a project, usually for easing edges and making minor tweaks to end grain. My first was an ancient Stanley #102 with a tight mouth. It was replaced by a modern LN #102. It lives in a drawer when not in use.
    It's wood dust. Saw dust would suggest a problem.

  7. #7
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    I had an apron plane until the Hurricane Harvey flood decimated my shop. I think I will order another.

  8. #8
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    Simon: Try using it to level inlay string work, and you will love your block or apron plane a lot more!

    Not sure I’ve interpreted this correctly, but I use both LN violin plane and the Veritas miniature plane for leveling inlay and stringing. I don’t know why the smaller LV pocket plane would cause someone to prefer a larger plane for this type of work.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    Simon: Try using it to level inlay string work, and you will love your block or apron plane a lot more!

    Not sure I’ve interpreted this correctly, but I use both LN violin plane and the Veritas miniature plane for leveling inlay and stringing. I don’t know why the smaller LV pocket plane would cause someone to prefer a larger plane for this type of work.
    You are referring to inlay work on a small surface (small boxes etc.) which, yes, smaller planes work well (I pointed that out in my last post). I am referring to inlay work on my previous dining table (3.5' x 6.5', give or take), cabinet doors, etc.

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 01-20-2019 at 7:04 PM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Kevin, How often do you reach for a block plane?

    Do you wear a shop apron while working?

    To me this plane would be very useful. Just like the five others that are capable of doing what this plane does.

    jtk
    Jim, I already have a LV LABP, LV DX60, LV Apron Plane, Stanley 60 1/2 and a LN 102.

    I also have the LV miter plane and a pair of LV Rabbet block planes, but perhaps those donít count.


    So I guess Iím primarily asking if the LV Pocket Plane would add capability that I donít already have covered by my other block planes?

  11. #11
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    Simon, yes, I was referring to smaller projects. I can understand your point on a larger piece. Thank you. Although, I do find a smaller plane useful for even larger projects. I can see what I’m doing better, as well as minimize any material removal on either side of the stringing/banding, especially when going cross grain.
    Last edited by Phil Mueller; 01-21-2019 at 10:06 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Bjorgen View Post
    I bought this plane when it was first introduced last year. Didnít really need it but the size and looks attracted me. I used it mainly to chamfer legs and other parts of a small table I was finishing. Iíll say right now that I also own the Lie-Nielsen 102 block plan that Iíve had since the late 90ís and the Veritas plane pretty much duplicates what the LN plane does. In fact the chamfering on that table was started with the 102 and then the Veritas model was delivered so I then put it to work.

    I donít wear an apron for woodworking so the pocket idea does not apply for me. But it is a nice little plane and the PM V-11 blade is certainly nice. If you donít already have a small block plane this could be a good purchase but for me it was an unnecessary but nevertheless interesting purchase. Iíll probably hang on to it.
    I pretty much agree with Charles.

    I've long been a fan of the LN #103, which I have had for over 20 years. I generally stick to using the full size block planes for most tasks, but the small block planes were purchased to work on small areas. The small plane allows for better visibility and to focus on specific points (as the width it can cut is narrower). I purchased the LN #101 for this work. My one concern about the #101 was the largish mouth (I modified this with brass shim). When the Veritas Pocket Plane arrived, courtesy of pre-production testing I do for LV, it was notable for the very fine mouth and fine adjuster. It is the block plane that is the most capable of all for working with precision in small areas. It is like using a scalpel in place of a bread knife. I like it so much that I ordered the SS version a few weeks ago as a birthday present to myself (I really do not need two of these, so the SS is just to keep my NX60 company).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  13. #13
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    This is the one I like to keep in my pocket.
    http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...at=1,230,41182

  14. #14
    No idea about the veritas block plane.

    Compared to the apron plane. Smaller. More refined. I "feel" the wood better. Mine is the fancy stainless version.

    In use, the adapter is a bit awkward. I tend to bump fingers on the cap. It's smooth and precise though.

    Caveat: I mainly focus on small stuff like instruments and maybe chamfering some trim.

  15. #15
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    Kevin; the clear difference in opinion may lie in the fact that Lie Nielsen is not the corporate sponsor of this hand tool forum.

    Take the opportunity to trial both brands of block plane, and make your own judgement on what will best suit your needs.

    Stewie;
    Last edited by Stewie Simpson; 01-30-2019 at 4:59 AM.

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