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Thread: Shaker door and drawer questions

  1. #1
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    Shaker door and drawer questions

    When making a "shaker Drawer" is it done the same exact way as a Shaker door.... (very short stiles)?

    shaker drawer IMG_1939.jpg

    I have also see a very clean single board option to drawer fronts on shaker cabs...any one have any suggestions on these?

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  2. #2
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    You pay your money and take your choice. I favor solid drawer fronts because they will take more abuse.

  3. #3
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    We have white Shaker style cabinets in our kitchen. Doors are very simple rail-and-stile with a flush panel, as in your photo. Drawer fronts are solid, flush with just a round-over on the edges (the type Lowell referred to).

    My understanding is that the Shakers went for very simple, functional designs - minimal ornamentation - so my guess would be that solid drawer fronts would be more of a true Shaker style.

  4. #4
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    For smaller vertical size drawers, I use solid drawer fronts. For larger drawers, such as the two that I would typically put below the top drawer, I personally do a "pseudo frame and panel" door, but it's really a solid piece of ~1/2" high quality plywood with 1/4" thick "rails and stiles" laminated on the fronts. That provides a strong drawer front with the frame and panel look. (I build my high end equestrian tack trunks the same way)
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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    Top drawer should be solid fronts. IF they are stained grade it looks better if the drawer fronts are grain matched, in most kitchens this is do able , itís not often youíll run into a 12í or 16í continuous run of top drawers.

    Lower drawers , generally at taller and look better in a stile and rail look.
    Thatís my .02 cents.

  6. #6
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    I have always made up a drawer panel which is basically a door with an extra cross rail centred where each horizontal gap will be. After assembly and sanding, it gets sawn into the separate drawer fronts. This results in fully framed, very robust drawer fronts. It also maintains perfect grain matching if the job is polished timber.

    This is the way to do any fielded panel drawer front set. You design and set out the fronts as you want them to appear and then make the drawers to suit the fronts. This is the critical step commonly ignored. The drawer internal can be a bit deeper or shallower and it is not noticed. Oddly sized drawer fronts to suit perfectly equal drawer internals are seen by every one. Cheers

  7. #7
    you show painted, I make a drawer front match the door 5 pcs. (only inset) Shows no continuity in design plunking a solid drawer front when you have 5 piece doors though most do it.

  8. #8
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    We do all the above.

    That is based on the client telling us what we want be it a architect home owner or designer.

    It all really depends what looks best. So far my least favorite look for a top drawer is panneled with stiles as wide as the stiles on the doors bellow and skinny rails. If I’m gonna do the panels drawer I want my stiles and rails both skinny. Maybe not exactly the same dimension but not drastically different.

    Slabs have their place but I agree they look cheap unless doing scontemporay slab style full overlay.

    I say make a sample of each then you will know for sure. Yeah if you only have one shaper it will take you more time than you like to make the two panneled doors but your gonna live with it for at least 20 years so what’s a few hours.





    t.
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    you show painted, I make a drawer front match the door 5 pcs. (only inset) Shows no continuity in design plunking a solid drawer front when you have 5 piece doors though most do it.

  9. #9
    I do the styles as wide again for continuity and the rails what they need to be to fit the knob. Stuff is on the wide side in the photo, bottom rail on the door shown is wrong.
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 01-19-2019 at 12:06 PM.

  10. #10
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    Oh yeah I didn’t excels pthe picture to look at it till it’s now.

    Doors look longer than adjacent cabs and bottom rail is a different size. Weird?




    .
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    I do the styles as wide again for continuity and the rails what they need to be to fit the knob. Stuff is on the wide side in the photo, bottom rail on the door shown is wrong.

  11. #11
    We do mostly inset, and a lot of square profile.

    Typically slab fronts on the top drawer which is almost always a 5" opening, paneled on the bottom two. The only thing we do differently with the 5 piece drawer fronts is glue a scrap of 1/4" material into the back side so the pull/knob isn't squeezing on a gap.

    You can do paneled fronts on top, but not shrinking the rail width looks funny to me, and shrinking them looks funny to me too.

    There's no real rules. Build whatever looks good to you.

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    Martin,

    Do you guys use the little floating threaded inserts on the your drawer fronts?

    If so how much a pain in the ass is it and how much labor and or additional cost would you say it incurs for the average medium to large project. You know kitchen, a couple l’s, fridge box, large island, pantry, hutch, and 2-3 vanities of various sizes.


    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    We do mostly inset, and a lot of square profile.

    Typically slab fronts on the top drawer which is almost always a 5" opening, paneled on the bottom two. The only thing we do differently with the 5 piece drawer fronts is glue a scrap of 1/4" material into the back side so the pull/knob isn't squeezing on a gap.

    You can do paneled fronts on top, but not shrinking the rail width looks funny to me, and shrinking them looks funny to me too.

    There's no real rules. Build whatever looks good to you.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Martin,

    Do you guys use the little floating threaded inserts on the your drawer fronts?

    If so how much a pain in the ass is it and how much labor and or additional cost would you say it incurs for the average medium to large project. You know kitchen, a couple l’s, fridge box, large island, pantry, hutch, and 2-3 vanities of various sizes.
    I think I know what you're talking about, and no. We use a couple of tapered shims to position the front in the opening, then bang them with a pin nailer from the back side so they can be screwed on solidly. We rely on the adjustment in the drawer hardware for any adjustment.

  15. #15
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    We do the same but we have a shop we do overflow work for that uses them and has requested we do.

    I like the idea of them vrs the fast app screws we use. I think the four screws, one in either corner is pretty ugly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Wasner View Post
    I think I know what you're talking about, and no. We use a couple of tapered shims to position the front in the opening, then bang them with a pin nailer from the back side so they can be screwed on solidly. We rely on the adjustment in the drawer hardware for any adjustment.

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