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Thread: Mystery nicks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    NE Iowa
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    Mystery nicks

    Today, working on a new bench setup, had to joint some rough lumber. Pushed a nice bit of hard maple through the machine, and it was just harder than hell getting it to go. Looked at the resulting surface and it's terribly rough with a groove down the center - a groove, not a raised relief from nicked blades! So I look at the jointer. It's got a big gouge with a raised divot in the trailing edge of the infeed table, the cutter head looks like somebody took a monkey wrench to it, and 2 of 3 blades nicked deeply enough to be unsalvageable.

    Ok, so obviously somebody jointed a board with a screw, or looking at the damage, maybe a bolt, in it on my machine. I can't recall doing so though, and nobody but me EVER goes in that shop.

    Aside from the couple of hours hours it took to repair the machine, the real damage is to my self-confidence. How did I do that and not know it instantly? People trust me with some pretty big decisions at work. Not sure that's a good idea at this point.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    So Cal
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    2,197
    That’s sounds terrible Steve, I’ve also had some unexplained things happen that have lead me to pay very close attention to what I use.
    Never will I stack wood on my shop floor or leave it uncovered outside side.
    Im sure not saying you dont.
    Hope your jointer wasn’t damaged to much.
    Aj

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    That does bite. Andrew makes a good point..it could very well have been debris sticking to a piece of wood, but it's strange that you didn't hear something, etc., when it happened. Either that, or you have a infestation of some amazing metal eating creature that got hungry in the middle of some night...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    I would suspect a missing nut or bolt on the cutterhead.
    Bil lD

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I would suspect a missing nut or bolt on the cutterhead.
    Bil lD
    My first thought too, but since I took it pretty much apart to clean the mess up, I can say it wasn't that.

    Had to be something as hard as steel though, so either it was in or stuck to a board, and I didn't realize it when it happened.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    I doubt if a bullet would be that hard. I will guess a wire, nail, rock or screw that the tree grew around,. Note that metal detectors do not sense rocks.

  7. #7
    I've found bullets embedded in lumber several times. I agree that most would not cause a problem. There are some that have steel cores.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    "Aside from the couple of hours hours it took to repair the machine, the real damage is to my self-confidence. How did I do that and not know it instantly?"

    I would blame it on good hearing protection. Stuff happens...best to put it behind you and thank yourself for protecting your hearing for your later years!

    Yes, I am serious!
    Too much to do...Not enough time...life is too short!

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Space View Post
    "Aside from the couple of hours hours it took to repair the machine, the real damage is to my self-confidence. How did I do that and not know it instantly?"

    I would blame it on good hearing protection. Stuff happens...best to put it behind you and thank yourself for protecting your hearing for your later years!

    Yes, I am serious!
    I had actually wondered if that didn't play a role. I've been pretty casual over the years with hearing protection in the shop, but last year got a very good industrial headset. I probably had them on last time I used the jointer before the recent discovery, as I was doing a lot of jointing and planing, and I always wear them for the latter. One thing I dislike about them is that I can't tell if I don't turn some machines off with the ear defenders on.

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