Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 29 of 29

Thread: Safety Glasses

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lawrenceburg, Tenn.
    Posts
    1,115
    Your optometrist should be able to make you a pair safety glasses that work for your Rx whatever it is.

    Doc
    As Cort would say: Fools are the only folk on the earth who can absolutely count on getting what they deserve.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hatfield, AR
    Posts
    1,158
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Decker View Post
    I've tried Zenni and one other online company, although not for protective glasses, and I won't do it again. The low price is, obviously, tempting. The service after the sale was non-existent.

    In both cases, I was using my current prescription, a prescription that works great on the glasses from my local eye doc. In both cases, there was distortion that was not seen with my local glasses. In both cases, they said sorry, but we followed the script you sent us.

    For me, lesson learned.
    That sucks you had a bad experience. I've used them for 9 years and never had a problem. I buy a couple pair because they are so cheap and pick the one I like best - toss the other. If I bought glasses from my eye doc, I'd spend $150-$250.

    For $29, it's worth a try IMO. Otherwise you'll be paying over $300 for prescription goggles. Maybe the OP can look for a low profile pair of glasses that fit under goggles.
    Last edited by Justin Ludwig; 01-13-2019 at 11:43 AM. Reason: removed banned word
    -Lud

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,325
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Ludwig View Post
    That you had a back experience. I've used them for 9 years and never had a problem.
    Let's not get confused. Glasses, like shoes or a quality hat, are specific to the wearer. Some folks can wear the most generic work boot with great comfort and long wear. Others need something a little more specific. Foster Grant made a fortune in designing a sun glasses line that would fit most people, most of the time and that's great.

    Some people's glasses require a bit of prism or one pupil is significantly higher than the other, we know who we are through experience. The greater degree of variance from the average, the more generic eye wear becomes unsatisfactory. This doesn't make them bad, just inadequate for all situations.

    Like anything, if you can get equal service for less money, it is a boon. If you need a little more personal service, we expect to pay for that.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 01-13-2019 at 9:41 AM.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  4. #19
    If you hold your glasses up in front of a polarized light and see blue or purple areas in the lens that is distortion. You can also put on a pair of polarized sunglasses and look at the lens while hold the lens toward a bright window area and see the same thing. If you remove that lens from the frame and the blue and purple areas are gone, the frame is distorting the lens. A good optometrist or optician will do this before you ever see the glasses to make sure the lens is properly mounted.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  5. #20
    Nick, I get my prescription done by a doctor who moved here from California. I'm in VA. The first pair of glasses was not
    exactly right,turned out there was a difference in the way they were noted. After a problem she graciously accepted
    the East coast model.
    Last edited by Mel Fulks; 01-13-2019 at 10:26 AM.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Central Missouri, U.S.
    Posts
    1,202
    I totally agree with what Glenn said about the specialized needs that some people have. My issue was more about the options I had if there was a problem. Zenni must work fine for a lot of people or they wouldn't be in business. My local eye doc will do what's necessary to make things right or he knows HE won't be in business.

    Another issue I had was the basic quality of the frames I got online. There's a reason they cost $10 or so, as opposed to $80 - $100. Think Harbor Freight.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Newport News, VA
    Posts
    848
    I have gotten my safety glasses from Safevision. They have a large selection. I prefer wrap around with gaskets compared to side shields. My day work doesn't require safety glasses but i pretty much switch pairs when I walk into my shop.
    If you only took one trip to the hardware store, you didn't do it right.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hatfield, AR
    Posts
    1,158
    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Let's not get confused. Glasses, like shoes or a quality hat, are specific to the wearer. Some folks can wear the most generic work boot with great comfort and long wear. Others need something a little more specific. Foster Grant made a fortune in designing a sun glasses line that would fit most people, most of the time and that's great.

    Some people's glasses require a bit of prism or one pupil is significantly higher than the other, we know who we are through experience. The greater degree of variance from the average, the more generic eye wear becomes unsatisfactory. This doesn't make them bad, just inadequate for all situations.

    Like anything, if you can get equal service for less money, it is a boon. If you need a little more personal service, we expect to pay for that.
    I agree 100%. But the price is worth the try IMO.
    -Lud

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
    Posts
    943
    I understand that everyone wants a bargain. However, you only have two eyes and it amazes me that people will take a chance with a cheap pair of safety glasses. Isn't the wrong time to find out that cheap pair isn't as impact resistant as it should be when you actually have that moment of impact? Properly fitting safety glasses with side shields can literally save your eyes. There are times that you need goggles or a faceshield in addition to safety glasses. I'd be all in for trying Zenni or whomever for just street glasses but not when protecting my eyes is the primary objective. Having worn safety glasses for past 40 years I know they can and do work. What is your eyesight worth to you? Just my 2 cents.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    3,684
    Zenni sells premium frames that are about as good as any you can get but you have to pay more.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Abilene, TX
    Posts
    103
    My suggestion is like many others here, I wore corrective lens for 37 years and I fly airplanes for living, I got to a point that I needed trifocals to have distant and visision at 12 inches over my head to read the over head panel, then 18 inches to see the Instrument panel in front of me.

    I opted for lasic surgery (I am not suggesting you do that it is what I did at age 46) that solved all of my problems, Having worn glasses since the elementary school I was use to having something in front of eyes all those years, after the surgery it was great not having obstruction to my vision such as the frames of the glasses. When I was
    In the shop I had to get in the habit of wearing safety glasses, real safety glasses not the polycarbonate type that look cool that you can by for $8.00 at the big box store.
    I am glad I did have real safety glasses, I was doing something stupid with the table saw cutting a 4 inch log, and forgot to put in the riving knife, I should have been using a band saw but I did not have one. I also should have been using a miter sled, but I was not. I got a kick back and that wet hickory Chung of wood hit me square between the eyes and on the nose.
    I saw stunned, and in a daze. The first thing I did was stop the saw then After regaining my assessment abilityies, I reached for my nose to expect a bloody gooey mess. To my relief no blood, no real visual trauma. My nose was acheing pretty bad. I called for my wife we placed a bag of frozen peas’s on face, that kept the swelling down.

    i sat in a chair and just reflected on what had happened, and how lucky I was.
    A few minutes latter I went to the shop to look at my safety glasses, the glasses had obsorbed at lot of impact and spread the energy to the bridge of my nose. Looking at glasses I saw smudge mark that was about 1/4 in diameter inline with my right eye. Looking at the log it had a stob protruding from the log 1/2 to 3/4 of and inch long. Had I been wearing the cheap safety glasses I could have lost my eye,

    So my suggestion is look for proper Safety Glasses I am glad I did.

    Lane

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    867
    I have always worn optical safety glasses with side shields. I got them from my optometrist and, frankly, they will last forever. Not pretty, but functional.

  13. #28
    I've worn bifocal safety glasses for years. Get them at the optical center in local Walmart. Last pair had those "cute" smaller frames, which look cool, but next pair will have the big frames and lenses. Small lenses let too much stuff get past. Keep a pair of Dollar Store readers in my welding helmet.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio
    Posts
    4,387
    A few years ago I got a pair of safety glasses at Walmart. They are the wrap around style. I like them a lot and plan to get a new pair soon. I dont think they were much more than $80. Maybe cheaper???
    "Remember back in the day, when things were made by hand, and people took pride in their work?"
    - Rick Dale

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •