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Thread: Anyone recognize these seed clusters from a shrub?

  1. #1
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    Anyone recognize these seed clusters from a shrub?

    These little fuzzy "clusters" are small, maybe an inch in diameter. They grow hanging down. The shrub has yellow flowers in late winter or very early spring. The shrub trunk is 3-4" or so in diameter.

    __temp2.jpg

    JKJ

  2. #2
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    Not the same thing, but the one type of magnolia-related shrub we have in front of the house sports fuzzy buds like this through the winter until the flowers appear in spring.
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  3. #3
    What size is the shrub? Is the shrub deciduous (loses its leaves) or evergreen? Any pictures or description of the leaves?
    I read recipes the same way I read science fiction. I get to the end and I think, "Well, thatís not going to happen."

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Chance in Iowa View Post
    What size is the shrub? Is the shrub deciduous (loses its leaves) or evergreen? Any pictures or description of the leaves?
    I asked all these questions. The shrub was less than "person height", no photos available. They said no leaves were available but no more info. The plant was at the house of a friend of a friend of a friend. I didn't even get the location. We were hoping someone would recognize the little fuzzy hanging seed clusters. I can't remember ever seeing one but I brought one home.

  5. #5
    John, I asked a friend from church who is a Master Gardener, who has lots of friends, that work with plants. This is what she determined: "Edgeworthia chrysantha 'Snow Cream' They tell me this is Edgeworthia frequently called paper plant Seems as though the Japanese still make paper from it. Hardy from Zone 7 to 9 or 10. It sets buds late in the fall similar to rhodys and blooms very early in the spring ahead of the leaf. fragrant I've heard of and think I had a friend plant one years ago but don't know if she got it to survive or not. Possible as she is very near the lake If you google it, you'll see that there are several varieties of it and some of the pictures are a little difficult to determine much. But it looks to me as though it really is a bud as opposed to a seed pod although I dont know when the photo was taken which would make a big difference."

    I hope this helps
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 01-13-2019 at 5:41 PM.
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  6. #6
    Good work,Lee. I would call the fuzzy silver things "catkins".

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    John, I asked a friend from church who is a Master Gardener, who has lots of friends, that work with plants....
    Excellent! Based on that I found pictures on the web and sent them to my friend who has been trying to find out what it is.

    _paper-plant.jpg

    She did say it was very fragrant and blooms very early, before most other things. Please convey our thanks to your friend!

    This place is a incredible resource.

    JKJ

  8. #8
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    John, if it's an early bloomer, you'll want to check to see if it generates any bee activity. I know our hellebores (that start blooming in the next month or so) do get some bee activity at least for pollen early on warm days.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    John, if it's an early bloomer, you'll want to check to see if it generates any bee activity. I know our hellebores (that start blooming in the next month or so) do get some bee activity at least for pollen early on warm days.
    I would if I had one. This question came from a friend in Asheville who saw the plant in parts unknown. I believe she is trying to find the name so she can acquire and plant one.

    We've had some warm days lately and the bees have been active. I've been feeding "winter patties" and they have been scarfing them down.

    JKJ

  10. #10
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    Ah...I understand.

    Despite it being just above 30 degrees today ambient air temp, there are some bees hanging out and even flying at the front of the hives in the sun. I guess that the sun is warming things up enough "right there" for them to want to come out, relieve themselves and play a little. Strange for this time of year!
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Ah...I understand.

    Despite it being just above 30 degrees today ambient air temp, there are some bees hanging out and even flying at the front of the hives in the sun. I guess that the sun is warming things up enough "right there" for them to want to come out, relieve themselves and play a little. Strange for this time of year!
    If you want some excitement on a "warm" day pop the top off an active hive for a quick peek. I did that to see if it was time to add another winter patty. About 15 protectors came out in a heartbeat to negotiate my withdrawal.

    JKJ

  12. #12
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    Professor Dr. SWMBO fed and did OA about a week ago on a warmish day...all six colonies plus the NUC were happy to see her.
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