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Thread: Advice on First Chuck

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
    Posts
    1,158
    I had SN2 chucks but found issues with the limited jaw opening compared to the Strong hold. I normally turn tennons to hold the bowl blank with the chuck. I found during the drying process the tennons shrink so much that by the time you true up the tennon, the SN canít grip it to final turn. There is a lot more travel with the Stronghold. I have since finished those bowls with the Stronghold Chuck. It might not seem like a big deal but I turn a lot of burl.

    I am sure there was a better fix for my problem but the Stronghlod works for me.

  2. #17
    Btw, the supernova 2 anniversary kit doesn't come with any jaws that will hold a small round or square spindle. Like a wand... A two inch or slightly less tenon is the smallest size. You will probably need to buy at least one extra jaw set.

    C

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,116

    holding small things

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint Bach View Post
    Btw, the supernova 2 anniversary kit doesn't come with any jaws that will hold a small round or square spindle. Like a wand... A two inch or slightly less tenon is the smallest size. You will probably need to buy at least one extra jaw set.
    My favorite small Nova jaws are the mini spigot jaws: https://www.teknatool.com/product/no...ssory-jaw-set/
    I use them a lot to grip 1/2" squares. Some of the other small spigot jaws only have one screw per jaw segment but these have two. I turn the handles, clappers, and connection pieces for these little handbell ornaments from 1/2" squares:

    bells_PC244161es.jpg

    But I don't use jaws for thin spindles like wands, conductor batons, and such. Instead, I turn a short #2 Morse Taper on the end while holding between centers, quick and easy to make once you know how. This taper fits in the headstock spindle socket and has lots of advantages, there is better clearance at the end since the chuck is not in the way, no jaws to bang careless fingers, a longer blank can be turned on a smaller lathe, and best, I can take the piece off the lathe and remount at any time without losing precise registration - usually not possible with a chuck. Here is one on a blank and a couple on finished wands but not yet cut off and hand finished. (I have turned 100s this way)

    morse_taper_IMG_5054.jpg

    I also sometimes use collets for thin spindles and especially for finials. These are #2 Morse taper collets that fit in the headstock socket and this size will hold a 1/2" tenon, easier to make than the taper. Great for thin things that need to be turned unsupported by the tailstock. The collets are cheap ($10 or so) and are threaded for a 3/8" drawbar, easily made. They have the same advantages as the wood #2MT with the further advantage of a secure hold even when the tailstock is removed.

    collet_finials_larger.jpg

    My other favorite Nova jaws for fairly small things are the 35mm, 45mm, and the long nosed jaws. The most worthless set of jaws I bought are the step jaws. I'll give them away for free for the first person who knocks on the my door wanting them. (they are not worth the knock!)

    JKJ

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    My favorite small Nova jaws are the mini spigot jaws: https://www.teknatool.com/product/no...ssory-jaw-set/
    I use them a lot to grip 1/2" squares.

    [snip] My other favorite Nova jaws for fairly small things are the 35mm, 45mm, and the long nosed jaws. The most worthless set of jaws I bought are the step jaws. I'll give them away for free for the first person who knocks on the my door wanting them. (they are not worth the knock!)
    JKJ
    Despite being primarily a spindle turner, I have yet to use mini-spigot jaws (or perhaps once every year or two?), perhaps because I do not do *very small* diameter spindles. The 35 and 45 mm jaws, however, I use very frequently in spindle turning. I highly recommend them. I have a set of step jaws which I've never used. I agree as to how useless they are.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    My favorite small Nova jaws are the mini spigot jaws: https://www.teknatool.com/product/no...ssory-jaw-set/
    I use them a lot to grip 1/2" squares.

    My other favorite Nova jaws for fairly small things are the 35mm, 45mm, and the long nosed jaws.

    JKJ
    John (and Robert):
    Couple of questions on these small Nova jaws for use in spindle turning:

    1. What is the profile inside of the mini spigot jaws? Are they smooth, same diameter top to bottom, or do they have the slight indentation/mini dovetail like the 50mm jaws? I couldn't tell from the pictures or descriptions on the Nova site.
    2. For the 35 and 45 mm jaws, which type do you use? The spigot versions that have the serrated teeth or the bowl version that are smooth inside?

    Thanks,
    Dave

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,116

    Notes on Nova jaws for smaller things

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Bunge View Post
    John (and Robert):
    Couple of questions on these small Nova jaws for use in spindle turning:

    1. What is the profile inside of the mini spigot jaws? Are they smooth, same diameter top to bottom, or do they have the slight indentation/mini dovetail like the 50mm jaws? I couldn't tell from the pictures or descriptions on the Nova site.
    2. For the 35 and 45 mm jaws, which type do you use? The spigot versions that have the serrated teeth or the bowl version that are smooth inside?

    Thanks,
    Dave
    The small jaws I have (mini spigot, pin jaws, 25mm, and 20 mm) are smooth inside and smooth* + dovetailed outside.

    *The outsides of these are cylindrical all the way to the base so the jaws can expand nicely into a drilled hole. But unlike the larger dovetailed jaws, the dovetail is machined into the OD end, keeping the same max diameter.

    The smooth inside diameters on these jaws are between 5/16" and 3/8". The heights of the taller jaws from the top of the chuck are 1-3/8"+, great for long 1/2" square blanks since on a SN2 chuck I can sink them over 2" into the jaws and chuck body to shorten protrusion of the part I'm working on, then extend them further to work on the next piece. Note also that the 20mm jaws appear to be identical to the 25mm jaws but with the end turned down to a smaller diameter, leaving a 25mm step at the base of the jaws.

    If I had just one I'd get the mini spigot jaws.

    I use these larger jaws for larger spindle work (note there are several views, click under the photo),
    35mm jaws, serrated inside, dovetail outside:
    https://www.teknatool.com/product/no...ssory-jaw-set/

    45mm jaws, serrated inside, dovetail outside:
    https://www.teknatool.com/product/no...ssory-jaw-set/

    Long nose, dovetail outside, dovetail + serrated inside
    https://www.teknatool.com/product/no...ssory-jaw-set/

    Those serrated inside are very good at holding a long spindle when a long tenon is first turned. However, I mostly use them on square stock, grabbing the corners between the jaws. This is the way I usually hold short 2" square stock with the std 50mm jaws but with the extra depth of the three jaws above they are very secure for holding longer unsupported square stock. For example, I can easily chuck an 10-12" 2x2 or 8" 1.5x1.5 blank and turn something first on the end (unsupported by the tailstock), part that off then turn another one, etc. I do this for small things like tops and eggs since making two or three from one long piece uses less wood then using two or three shorter blanks.

    BTW, an unsupported longer blank will also work with the std 50mm/2" jaws too but with some wood there can be vibration on first one but it's not really a problem and easily controllable once you know how. I first support the end with the tailstock to turn the blank round then remove the tailstock to turn the thing. I'll get two eggs out of this blank and have a shorter piece left over for something else.

    egg_turning_blank.jpg

    FWIW, you can turn any of these jaws down on the wood lathe to true them up if needed (rare) or to make a smaller custom size. (Before truing be sure the problem is not a bit of dust or a burr or something under the jaws.) I use a Thompson scraper. Here's a 25mm jaw set I'm turning down to 19mm for a special use.

    turning-steel_IMG_20170605_081521_124.jpg

    JKJ
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 01-18-2019 at 4:31 PM. Reason: clarification

  7. #22
    JKJ's reply covers the 35 and 45 mm jaws well. My only addition is that I use these jaws when I'm turning 1x1 spindles up to almost 18" in length.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    112
    Thanks John and Robert for the info on the smaller Nova jaws. I'll be getting some in the near future. Surprisingly, to me at least, homedepot.com had the lowest price by a decent margin vs other online vendors I checked.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Bunge View Post
    Thanks John and Robert for the info on the smaller Nova jaws. I'll be getting some in the near future. Surprisingly, to me at least, homedepot.com had the lowest price by a decent margin vs other online vendors I checked.
    They do look cheaper. Or get the mini jaw set, four jaws for about $30 each and sell the extras to turners at your club. It does include step jaws but of the two types of step jaws Nova offers, they are the more useful.

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