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Thread: Crosscut Sled Question

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
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    12,923
    Consider 1/4" thick white PVC sheet for your sled. PVC is never affected by humidity and stays perfectly flat. Pencil marks wipe right off with a damp towel or cloth.

    A couple years ago I built a sled for my band saw from 3/4" PVC which I had in my shop and it has been a great sled. If I ever build another sled I will use 1/4" PVC for less weight and 3/4" thick PVC for the fence, the stuff is really durable and PVC glue is pretty much a permanent bond for the fence. I'm using Corian Solid Surface material for the runners.
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  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    fayetteville Arkansas
    Posts
    491
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    Consider 1/4" thick white PVC sheet for your sled. PVC is never affected by humidity and stays perfectly flat. Pencil marks wipe right off with a damp towel or cloth.

    A couple years ago I built a sled for my band saw from 3/4" PVC which I had in my shop and it has been a great sled. If I ever build another sled I will use 1/4" PVC for less weight and 3/4" thick PVC for the fence, the stuff is really durable and PVC glue is pretty much a permanent bond for the fence. I'm using Corian Solid Surface material for the runners.
    Interesting, where can a fellow purchase 1/4" sheet PVC? Guess I'm a little surprised it is rigid enough for use as sled material. Learned something.
    Last edited by julian abram; 01-11-2019 at 1:44 AM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Northern Oregon
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    1,541
    Quote Originally Posted by julian abram View Post
    Interesting, where can a fellow purchase 1/4" sheet PVC? Guess I'm a little surprised it is rigid enough for use as sled material. Learned something.
    I thought thin would not be rigid enough as well. I found that as long as the base of the sled can hold the runner and the fence at 90 degrees it's accurate. Thinner sheet stock will flex more but conform to the flat machine surface easier. If a thicker sled gets bowed you must press down harder to flatten it.
    My 1/8" sled has a slight bow to it that's consistent, so holding the stock down as you cut it makes the sled flat. It's very lightweight with a single UHMW runner. It can crosscut 38" accurately with only 1/8" for the offcut to drop. It's this design, but no sawhorse. I have a workbench support :
    "Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t - you’re right."
    - Henry Ford

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    NE Iowa
    Posts
    394
    I have and value sleds made both from 1/2" baltic birch and 3/4". The 1/2" is smaller, light, and extremely handy. I like the large 3/4" one because I have embedded threaded inserts in it. It's rigid enough that I can use those to screw cam clamps down for holding small pieces. That way I can use it for some very awkward cuts, even on small pieces, safely. I really like the idea of the 1/4" PVC though.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    381
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    My latest one was made from 1/2" Baltic birch and based on the William Ng design using the 5 cut method of accurizing it.
    What Ken said.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,226
    Mine are all 3/4" BB ply. for the largest sled this is a weight issue. For the ones 30" wide and smaller it is not. If and when I re-make a larger sled I will try the 1/2" with slots and dado's for the t-bolt accessories. The t-track is all that really pushes me to the 3/4" material.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 01-12-2019 at 11:21 AM.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    456
    I'm with Andrew, mine is 3/16" plywood. One hand to put it on or off. I have no idea why anyone would use 3/4" unless it was all that was available.

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