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Thread: Seriously Considering Getting Rid of my Table Saw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Seriously Considering Getting Rid of my Table Saw

    Has anyone done this? I have a SawStop, but it's big and I really don't use it that much. I use a track saw for all plywood cutting and for ripping long boards. Most other cuts I usually go to my band saw. Really thinking of selling the SawStop and getting a MFT table for the track saw. I think that this would cover all of my cuts.

    Curious if anyone has gone this way and how it worked out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Southeast MI.
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    A friend of mine that works in the remodeling/construction trade & made one of the Paulk workbenches


    He mainly built it for being able to take it to job sites, But when he's not using it he stores it up-right in the corner of his garage.

    Doug

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Doylestown, PA
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    5,765
    If your bandsaw will work with a real carbide blade that may work. For me it wouldn't unless I upgraded my bandsaw (Rikon 10-325) to something like a Minimax. The Rikon, while it works very well will not produce cut as smooth as a table saw.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Palm Springs, CA
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    856
    It depends on what type of work you typically do. I sold off my Unisaw and went the MFT / Tracksaw route when I down sized a few years ago. I regretted it big time after building a large entertainment/media wall.. I missed the ability to easily and repeatably rip narrow stock for face frames, mill dados and conveniently cut small parts for boxes and small cases. Since I don't have room for a full size table saw without getting rid of several other tools, I went with the DeWalt portable on a rolling stand. Much happier now. My bandsaw also factored into that decision, but it just wasn't the answer for what I do.

    I know others have parted with their table saw and haven't missed it, but it didn't work for me.

    IMG_5338e.jpg
    Last edited by Dick Mahany; 01-09-2019 at 12:24 PM.
    Dick Mahany.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Crystal Lake, IL
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    555
    Maybe the best way for you to find out is to throw a cloth over the top of your saw, and put a piece of plywood over it, and use it for a cutting table. I wouldn't want to be without my table saw. After 30 years plus, I'm just too use to having one. I do a lot of fast joinery, dado's, etc....using it, and while I could certainly figure out another way of doing each and every function, it wouldn't be as fast. I also have a Festool track saw, and use it to break down sheet goods. Instead of spending all of that money on the Festool table, I made a set of horses at the right height, and put a 3/4" sheet of plywood on them. On top of the plywood, I lay a 1" sheet of polystyrene foam. The foam cushions the bottom of the ply (sometimes very expensive A grade stuff) from scratches, and also acts as a sacrificial surface to keep from cutting up my table. After 6 months or so, when it's all used up, I replace it for $10.

    Shut your saw down, and give it a try. That'll tell you whether or not you can go without.
    Jeff

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MA
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    1,485
    My brother did this and it suited him just fine to use the bandsaw. He is primarily a hand tool woodworker though.

    I like the idea of just 'going without' using it for a while (make it into a layout table) and see....

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Heath View Post

    Shut your saw down, and give it a try. That'll tell you whether or not you can go without.
    This is the best approach in my view, unless your sawstop has been in an idle state for a long time.

    Simon

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
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    381
    I, too, would suggest trying to go without using the SawStop for awhile before selling it. I dumped my old tablesaw and went to a track saw several years ago. This wasn't a big deal for me since the old tablesaw was really difficult because the tablesaw was, in fact, old, the arbor had too much wobble in it, and it was underpowered to begin with. I found, after a year or so, that ripping with a tracksaw was difficult no matter which of the many methods available I used. I ended up buying a job site saw for these jobs and it works well for the smaller stuff.

    I guess, If I had owned a good tablesaw at the time, I would likely have just continued to use it because I feel it is still one of the most universally useful power tools in the shop. So, I wouldn't sell it just yet until I tried to go without using at all.

  9. #9
    I've thought about the approach you're considering, but I'm going to keep my table saw. If your SS has casters, couldn't you store it in a corner, then pull it out when you need it? I know I would regret getting rid of it. The tool I want to get rid of is the SCMS. It takes up too much room, and it is a terrible dust creator. It seems to me that an MFT arrangement (either the MFT/3 or a DIY MFT) with a track saw would be a possible replacement at least for something 2" or less. I've got a small Hitachi 10" CMS that is very accurate that I could use when necessary. Good luck with your decision.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    1,126
    Since the track saw came on the market, this subject comes up very frequently. Surprised you couldn't formulate an answer from all the previous discussions. It's all personal preference. No way can I do any woodworking without a table saw. Center of the shop, gets used 100 times more than every other machine. Track saw collects a lot of sawdust from just sitting in the corner.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    60
    I agree with the previous poster, I have all of the other toys but the table saw is the center of all of my activities. No board ever makes it onto a project without going through my table saw, often half a dozen times.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Walls View Post
    A friend of mine that works in the remodeling/construction trade & made one of the Paulk workbenches

    Doug
    Holy smoke. That workbench seems to take up more space than a sawstop ics! His shop sure has tons of space.

    If I remember correctly, he also has a sawstop jobsite saw.

    Simon

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,222
    Hi, most of my work is solid material so I could eliminate the table saw.

    The band saw allows you to process rough material into pieces that can be dimensioned with a jointer and planer.

    My panel processing would normally be limited to panels for frame and panel doors and gables, so hand saw accuracy would be as good as I would need.

    Grooving and rebating I do on the shaper so I really could do without a table saw if I bought a track saw and a mitre saw.

    As others have suggested, lower the blade and remove the guard from your saw, use it a s table for a few months and see what you think.........Rod.

  14. #14
    It may work for you, but it would not work for me. I primarily use my table saw to rip medium size parts, like table legs, stretchers, drawer fronts, and also to make small pieces. I can't imagine trying to do that on a track saw. It sounds inaccurate at best and terrifying at worst. A bandsaw doesn't have the accuracy or finish I am looking for either.

  15. #15
    late 90's I sold my delta tilting arbor saw and bought a unisaw with 50" fence. the unisaw was just too big for garage and sold it.. 20 years later I am still without a table saw.


    I miss that tilting arbor

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