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Thread: Dust Collection fitting frustration

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,153
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Many of us use rubber Fernco sewer pipe fittings on the 120mm ports to adapt to 5" flex. Reasonably priced, too...
    Exactly!!
    Pick up a roll of 1/4" sticky backed insulation tape with them and you're done.

    One more "hack", is stove pipe.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    47,774
    Mike, when I needed to source something locally, "stove pipe" was the way to get 26 gage material, even at the 'borg, although they only carry 24" long snap-lock in that thickness. Other sources carried 60" material which was my preference.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,153
    Jim
    Yeah, there are a lot of ways to "skin this cat". I also know quite a few sheet metal workers, retired, and still working. If I ever needed something "special" done, they'd just crank it out.
    We have a really nice sheet metal fab shop at work. It's cool to watch them make duct work.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    7,348

    Make what you need and lose the frustsration

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike McDonough1948 View Post
    I am new here to this forum and this is my first post. I agree that there are many tools that have DC outlets that are hard to find the proper fitting to attach collection hoses to them. One thing I have done to overcome this is to use PVC to create my own adapters. If you use a heat gun and heat the end of a piece of PVC to get it soft you can then slide it over the outlet of the tool's dust port and let it cool. The PVC will form to the ports exact OD.
    Mike, I read this thread for the first time just now and after reading the first couple of messages I was going to suggest the PVC method also! I have done the heat and sizing, either with a heat gun or a propane torch if I don't care what it looks like. (also easy to bend PVC if needed - I did that installing a automatic waterer for the horses.) As you said, the stuff gets real soft with little effort cools in just a few minutes.

    If you have a lathe you can turn a wooden form to push over or inside the pipe, tapering the wood a bit to make it easier to get started.

    Another thing I did when installing my DC system (ClearVue) was make adapters with short pieces of 4" and 6" pipe, the bandsaw, and some glue. For example, if I wanted an adapter to slide into a 6" duct to make a coupler to a blast gate, I started with a ring of 6" pipe, calculated the needed circumference, then cut a segment out of the ring with the bandsaw to give the needed diameter when pressed together. Then I glued the new piece inside the 6" duct or inside a shorter ring to hold the size. It was very quick to make such fittings.

    I think anyone who designs or installs a dust collector should start by reading Bill Pentz. Guess what, he has good instructions for bending and forming PVC to make anything needed!

    How to Bend and Form PVC
    http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/pvc.cfm

    JKJ

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Livingston Texas
    Posts
    2
    Thanks John. I like the idea of turning a wooden cone shapen piece to slide inside the heated PCV. Also, the idea for making an adapter to fit inside a DC fitting is great. I have not tried that yet but it is on my list now. Thanks for your ideas.

    MJM

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,329
    My plastic DD ingress and egress ports are flared. I slipped the connectors on until tight, measured the location on the intake and cut the unneeded length of the flare off on the infeed. Didn't worry about the outfeed.
    She said “How many woodworking tools do you need?”
    I said “Why? Do you know someone who is selling some?”


  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mid Michigan
    Posts
    74
    Can't believe no one mentioned 3-D printer. Print your own.

    Bob

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