Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 26 of 26

Thread: Lathe size question

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,121
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Lisowski View Post
    I have a mini lathe which is fine for pen turning and other smaller turnings. I am limited by size to 12" swing. I have been looking at full size lathes. Since most full size lathes have reversible heads or outboard turning ability. So my question is, if you had to do it again would you go with whatever size you would use 95% of the time (16 or 18") or the largest swing you could afford?

    Thanks.
    Hi Bryan

    I am pretty much as novice as one can be when it comes to turning bowls. However, I have been turning spindles on a Jet mini plus bed extension for a decade, and used my brand spanking new Nova Saturn yesterday for the first time (turning spindles for a coffee table). The Jet was 1/2 hp. The Nova is 2.3 hp. Amazing difference just in power alone! Where the Jet would bog down in hardwood (the legs are Jarrah), the Nova does not blink an eye. The Nova also has the bed extension along with the optional cast iron legs, so it is a very heavy piece of equipment. Solid as a rock. All the power seems to get used, where the Jet, while I thought it stable, I now realize was absorbing some of the power owing to a light frame.

    None of this says anything about turning bowls. The swing of the Nova should see me through for anything reasonable I throw at it. That is a new world I enter.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  2. #17
    Bryan, the headstock slides to the other end of the lathe and the work is swung in the “gap” over the bed extension, which is mounted 7” lower than the ways of the lathe. I don’t think I included a pic of a piece on the lathe over the bed extension, but here is a pic from the web. The extension comes with a 7” riser block for the tailstock and an extension for the tool rest.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    418
    Quote Originally Posted by John Keeton View Post
    Bryan, the headstock slides to the other end of the lathe and the work is swung in the “gap” over the bed extension, which is mounted 7” lower than the ways of the lathe. I don’t think I included a pic of a piece on the lathe over the bed extension, but here is a pic from the web. The extension comes with a 7” riser block for the tailstock and an extension for the tool rest.
    John, read your review, very thorough, loaded with good info. I did see a picture of what you were speaking about, but the recent picture was a lot clearer. Thanks.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    418
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Hi Bryan

    I am pretty much as novice as one can be when it comes to turning bowls. However, I have been turning spindles on a Jet mini plus bed extension for a decade, and used my brand spanking new Nova Saturn yesterday for the first time (turning spindles for a coffee table). The Jet was 1/2 hp. The Nova is 2.3 hp. Amazing difference just in power alone! Where the Jet would bog down in hardwood (the legs are Jarrah), the Nova does not blink an eye. The Nova also has the bed extension along with the optional cast iron legs, so it is a very heavy piece of equipment. Solid as a rock. All the power seems to get used, where the Jet, while I thought it stable, I now realize was absorbing some of the power owing to a light frame.

    None of this says anything about turning bowls. The swing of the Nova should see me through for anything reasonable I throw at it. That is a new world I enter.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Derek, thanks for the reply. Always enjoy seeing your work! I have read in my research that the electronic controls have had issues, it wouldn't scare me away at this time, but would hate to have a recurring issue that could pop up after warranty. Just another thing to factor into my decision.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    6,121
    Bryan, all equipment makes will have some machines that experience issues. As far as I can tell (since this was a concern for me as well - anything with electronics must have a life span), Nova have been around using this technology for well over a decade. They are a respected New Zealand company with excellent reviews.

    It seems to me that everything made these days has variable speed, which means electronics are used. I was considering a small Vicmark with a bed extension. It was the same price, and I would have loved a Vicmark. But the swing was only 12" and it was 3/4 hp .... and it, too, would be subject to the electronic demons. It was my wife who provided some perpective when she said, "well, if you get 10 years from it, it will have paid for itself. Then get another". Now I prefer the idea of a lifetime tool, but I believe that we have moved away from this with the advent of computers inside machines. If you want a lifetime machine, get a manual, belt change type.

    My only gripes with the Nova so far are the colour/texture - I'm not made about the black, and it is textured (dust does not brush off as easily) ... and the soft touch buttons. I am used to poking something substantial. Perhaps it is a matter of getting used to it (it is really early days).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Last edited by Derek Cohen; 01-06-2019 at 1:02 AM.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    418
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Bryan, all equipment makes will have some machines that experience issues. As far as I can tell (since this was a concern for me as well - anything with electronics must have a life span), Nova have been around using this technology for well over a decade. They are a respected New Zealand company with excellent reviews.

    It seems to me that everything made these days has variable speed, which means electronics are used. I was considering a small Vicmark with a bed extension. It was the same price, and I would have loved a Vicmark. But the swing was only 12" and it was 3/4 hp .... and it, too, would be subject to the electronic demons. It was my wife who provided some perpective when she said, "well, if you get 10 years from it, it will have paid for itself. Then get another". Now I prefer the idea of a lifetime tool, but I believe that we have moved away from this with the advent of computers inside machines. If you want a lifetime machine, get a manual, belt change type.

    My only gripes with the Nova so far are the colour/texture - I'm not made about the black, and it is textured (dust does not brush off as easily) ... and the soft touch buttons. I am used to poking something substantial. Perhaps it is a matter of getting used to it (it is really early days).

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Good points that every machine may have an issue at some time and each lathe I'm looking at has some sort of electronics.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    306
    Quote Originally Posted by John Keeton View Post
    Bryan, the headstock slides to the other end of the lathe and the work is swung in the “gap” over the bed extension, which is mounted 7” lower than the ways of the lathe. I don’t think I included a pic of a piece on the lathe over the bed extension, but here is a pic from the web. The extension comes with a 7” riser block for the tailstock and an extension for the tool rest.
    I really like that feature. The G0800 has it but I don't think it comes with the riser block for the tail stock. Grizzly sells a short version of the G0800 (G0835) that the bed is only 24" long. With their 20" extension you basically get the G0800 without the fold away section of the bed for quite a bit less. Because of the riser block the 1836 was my second choice behind the G0766 (it was much lower priced then) and above the G0835. For us newbies it really comes down to buying what you think you will want down the road without pricing yourself too high and not buying at all. Being able to add options after the fact to expand the lathe's capability so you don't have to buy a new lathe (some of us are ok with having just one) is a big selling feature to me.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Pensacola FL
    Posts
    43
    No one has talked about needing 220V power in your shop for the larger lathes. That can add $250-350 in a heartbeat. I have a Laguna platinum 1847, predecessor to the Revo. It is 2HP and many time I have wished it was 3HP. When I bought it, I had greedy eyes and lusted to turn mega bowls. I have a bandsaw that will round a 6x18" blank...slowly...but the deciding factor is raising the blank to the lathe and mounting it. Unless you are young and very fit you should have an overhead chain hoist for those mega blanks. Then working through the initial imbalance and vibration is often exciting. A runaway blank that size is something you will not soon forget. Big lathe - more mass, less vibration; big lathe - more power, much easier turning. Your choice vs your means!

  9. #24
    I only have one word for you... getthebigone!

  10. #25
    Although outside of your price range, I own and use a Grizzly G0694 - 20" x 43" Heavy-Duty Variable-Speed Wood Lathe


    Heavy duty, solid and although they state the minimum RPM is 50, I can easily dial in 25 RPM, important for heavy and out-of-balance objects.

    The only thing missing on this and most lathes is the ability to turn items 8 feet long . . . . . . . .

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    418
    Right now I'm leaning towards the 2 Grizzlys I mentioned earlier. The smaller has an extension like the Laguna that can increase length to 47" and swing to about 28". The price is nice, and would allow for some accessories. I will need to ponder a bit more before making a final decision. Thanks for all the info.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •