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Thread: Selling minimax slider for sawstop

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    Birmingham, AL
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    31

    Selling minimax slider for sawstop

    So I had a beautiful sawstop industrial cabinet saw a couple years ago and decided to sell it and purchase a minimax sc4 elite. Really great saw, I just feel like I got way more out of my sawstop. I was hoping to love the slider for breaking down sheet goods but I have a track saw and tend to use it more when breaking down full sheets. I make lots of end grain cutting boards and have been using my bandsaw over my table saw for most all ripping and cross cutting. When I make table tops it is so much easier using my track saw to square it up than man handling it on the slider.

    Am I crazy for doing this or has anybody else done the same and been happy? Iím basically looking for guidance before I choose what to do. I know I could make plenty of jigs and what nots to make it easier but in the end I keep thinking most of what I did was easier on the sawstop.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Crozet, VA
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    153
    I wouldn’t give up my slider and go back to a “conventional” table saw, but the work I do may be much different than you (e.g., lots of long cross cuts). It’s ultimately a personal decision and if the Sawstop is a better tool for you that’s fine. Someone is going to get a nice Minimax slider out of that switch!

  3. #3
    I also wouldn't go back to a traditional table saw now that I have a slider.

    For something modestly-sized and rectangular (like cutting boards), it seems like the crosscut fence on the slider would be almost ideal. What tasks, specifically, do you find harder or more onerous on the slider?

  4. #4
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    Mar 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    I also wouldn't go back to a traditional table saw now that I have a slider.

    For something modestly-sized and rectangular (like cutting boards), it seems like the crosscut fence on the slider would be almost ideal. What tasks, specifically, do you find harder or more onerous on the slider?
    Squaring up the cutting boards on the slider is great. I donít rip as much because of the difference in blade width between the ts and bandsaw.
    I am not particularly loving anything that needs to be done on the right side of the blade. It feels rather awkward and I donít like it. I donít often break down many sheets of plywood at a time so thatís where my track saw seems to work well. Straight line rips would be better if I had a parallel jig Iím sure. Dust collection sucks on my saw but like everything else, Iím sure I could make something or buy like a shark guard to improve that. It needs some adjustment as well. The slider is slightly lower than the cast iron table so any time I clamp a work piece down it doesnít let me slide very easily.

    Basically lots of little things that are adding up for me. Maybe I just need to be more patient and do more with it to become comfortable. I also donít like when I put a sheet of plywood on the slider I then have to crawl under the sheet to turn the saw on.

  5. #5
    Having gone from a traditional to a slider, I entirely agree that there are tasks that seem harder. But many are easier, and I feel all operations are more safe. I rarely do anything on the right of the blade (as I agree it feels awkward and unsafe).

    I imagine the wagon being lower than the table would be incredibly irritating. I don't know the Minimax, but if the table is attached similar to the Hammer/Felder, it's quite easy to adjust up/down a bit:
    http://davidpbest.com/VA/StonehorseS...ng%20Table.htm

  6. #6
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    Mar 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    Having gone from a traditional to a slider, I entirely agree that there are tasks that seem harder. But many are easier, and I feel all operations are more safe. I rarely do anything on the right of the blade (as I agree it feels awkward and unsafe).

    I imagine the wagon being lower than the table would be incredibly irritating. I don't know the Minimax, but if the table is attached similar to the Hammer/Felder, it's quite easy to adjust up/down a bit:
    http://davidpbest.com/VA/StonehorseS...ng%20Table.htm

    Maybe I just need to get the wagon adjusted properly and maybe get me some sort of parallel ripping jig. Thatís where I tend to have to use the right side of the table and canít get very great results that way.

  7. #7
    The sliding table should be a little higher (0.004" to 0.008" is ok) than the cast iron table. If you do not have Fritz and Franz jig, make one (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0PyFjtSHrE&t=463s).

    Brian Lamb makes a nice parallel jig (https://lambtoolworks.com/parallel-fences).

    I never work on the right side of the blade, basically, the rip fence is a stop for me.

    Get a shark guard for your saw to improve the dust collection and safety. Since you do not have remote on/off button at the end of your slider, one solution is to start saw first or find an aftermarket solution. For the reasons you listed, it is why I ordered overhead saw guard and the remote on-off button for my KF700, that I consider the must-have options for the slider.

  8. #8
    Fritz and Franz should really be built and supplied with any new slider (IMO). Essential, indispensable, will totally change how you use the slider.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    You just gotta force yourself to use the rip fence or work on the right side of the blade. My best guess is your just scared and thus not taking full advantage of the machine.

    It took me two years working day in and day out on a slider to get to the point I don’t walk across the shop to the cabinet saw for rip cuts. So I’m not saying anything or busting your chops, I get that it does not feel natural. If you just force yourself to do it sooner or later it will feel as natural as as a cabinet saw.

    The idea of having a slider and using a track saw to break down sheet goods and claiming it is easier or faster has me confused. I at one point used a track saw also to deal with sheet goods and found it painfully slow and really really annoying.

    Each to his own though, you should do what works best for you and what is safe for you. I just find a slider way more convient for just about everything.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    Fritz and Franz should really be built and supplied with any new slider (IMO). Essential, indispensable, will totally change how you use the slider.
    I wish Mac's airtight clamp is supplied with the slider

    http://macsblogboard.blogspot.com/p/...s-gallery.html

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    You just gotta force yourself to use the rip fence or work on the right side of the blade. My best guess is your just scared and thus not taking full advantage of the machine.

    It took me two years working day in and day out on a slider to get to the point I donít walk across the shop to the cabinet saw for rip cuts. So Iím not saying anything or busting your chops, I get that it does not feel natural. If you just force yourself to do it sooner or later it will feel as natural as as a cabinet saw.

    The idea of having a slider and using a track saw to break down sheet goods and claiming it is easier or faster has me confused. I at one point used a track saw also to deal with sheet goods and found it painfully slow and really really annoying.

    Each to his own though, you should do what works best for you and what is safe for you. I just find a slider way more convient for just about everything.
    Not really but it just feels awkward to me. And Iím positive I havenít given myself enough time to take advantage of this machine.

    Not it saying the track is faster at all. Sometimes it is more convenient for just one sheet. If I were breaking down several sheets the slider would be better every time.

    I guess I just wanted to hear from some of you guys who use it often and hear your thoughts. I notice not a single person has said that they would go back to a cabinet saw.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I wouldn't give up my slider and go back to a cabinet saw, even for money. I can't think of anything that I did "better" on the cabinet saw and I work primarily with solid stock. The repeatable precision of the slider is what I favor and while something like SawStop "might" be technically safer due to the flesh sensing feature, I so rarely have my hands anywhere near the blade on my slider that I find it an acceptable risk in that respect.

    I think you're struggling with the "learning curve"...there are some things that you just plain do differently on a slider than on a cabinet saw. It's not about easy vs not-easy. It's about different. Other than certain narrow things, I do all my ripping on the wagon. I'm never in the line of fire for a kickback like I would be with a cabinet saw. My edges do not require a visit to the jointer to clean them up like they would if pushed along a fence by hand. The widths are precise because I use a Fritz 'n Franz setup to insure they are that way. Crosscuts are clean and absolutely repeatable in length and again, since I'm standing to the side, should something go awry at the blade, I'm not in the line of fire. But that's me and not necessarily the best for you.

    If you are truly unhappy, you should do what makes you most comfortable. A pre-owned slider will garner good money if you do decide to switch back.

    BTW, in full disclosure, I tend to initially break down sheet goods with my track saw simply because I struggle with the weight of a full sheet, even for nominal 1/2" material. It's age related and there's not much I can do about that.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 12-31-2018 at 11:26 AM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Grassy Lake Alberta
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    I find it interesting when guys talk about a 'learning curve' on sliders. For me that curve was using one for the first time,dang I have to get one of these. I started with a excalibur sliding table and immediately figured out what I had been missing. My next step was a 'real' sliding saw,Minimax Sc2 older and needed some work. I rehabbed it and adjusted it and saw how much better the carriage right beside the blade worked. Sold it and bought a Felder k700s and I am done. I would not want to ever have a cabinet saw only again. These things can do so much more so much faster and more precise. I still have my original Unisaw that gets used less and less,probably could sell it except for the dado ability.YMMV,Mike.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
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    271
    Do you have room to add a cabinet saw in addition to the slider? I feel you on ripping on the slider. Iíve said that a million times and itís just one of those things where people agree to disagree. I have both and I want both. I canít believe you arenít in love with the slider for making cutting boards? Itís a beautiful machine and process for making end grain. Iíve made some big boys in the last year a half on my slider and it was fantastic. Cutting the strips was much easier on my body, I made one long blank instead of 2-3 shorter blanks(kickback risk on a cabinet saw), and the strips came out perfectly square and true. This last one leads to near perfect glueups and decreases the amount you have to sand end grain, which is the suckiest of sucking. These two 4-6Ē thick 6-7í end grain island jobs paid for the used slider. I would probably transition to ripping on my bandsaw before I gave up the slider. Still, Iím a big fan of having both saws.

    I agree, sheets goods on a slider is just about as good as it gets. I save my TS75 for truing up islands and table tops I canít physically lift onto the outrigger.

  15. #15
    I have owned numerous sliders. I despise the typical 126" stroke saws. I hate the beams, don't want to build or use a jig to rip lumber.

    The only full stroke sliders I liked are the old martin t75s.

    I do love a short stroke old cast iron saw, martin t17, scmi si12, etc.

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