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Thread: Project: Rustic Kitchen Table Base and Natural Edge Top (Build)

  1. #46
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    Mar 2003
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    The scary part was next... It was time to cut the pocket in the "real board". Since I knew the positioning would be correct, I adjusted the file to account for the actual thickness of the material, set X-Y zero and let it fly. The cut only took a few minutes and the end result was spot-on. In fact, the purple heart plug fit really nice and snug with pretty much zero gaps after it was glued and "encouraged" into the pocket with a mallet.

    IMG_3439.jpg IMG_3440.jpg IMG_3441.jpg IMG_3442.jpg

    So that was fun, "educational" and took care of the matter at hand. Next up will be gluing up the top once my bench is clear from the client project, taking it to be sanded on a wide-belt and then finishing.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-09-2019 at 8:59 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #47
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    Woo-hoo! 'Got the top glued up today. I did the center three boards first, let that setup for about an hour or so and then added the two outside boards. The simple addition of the three Dominos on each joint line indexed to the top surface was a very good thing and made this task a lot easier. (center Domino cut "tight"; two outer ones cut "loose") There was no "slip-sliding" while clamping and the top is pretty darn close to each board being level to it's neighbor across the whole length. And yea, I used a "few" clamps to make sure everything was pulled in nice and tight.

    IMG_3449.jpg

    I let that set-up for another hour before removing just the clamps "on top" so I could scrape off the excess glue. The clamps on the bottom are staying on over night and also allowed me to trim the ends with my track saw. I could have done that on the slider, but rather than moving this big heavy thing multiple times, I chose to just keep it on the bench and make the cut in two slow passes.

    IMG_3451.jpg IMG_3452.jpg

    The marks were cleaned up with some hand planes and 80 grit on the ROS
    IMG_3453.jpg

    I'll be calling my friends at Bucks County Hardwoods tomorrow to setup a time to get this through their wide-belt and then I can commence with the finishing process.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-10-2019 at 9:46 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #48
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    Apr 2017
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    Wow, I love a big glue up. Everything came together nicely Jim.

  4. #49
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    Wow, I love a big glue up. Everything came together nicely Jim.
    "I love big glue-ups and I cannot lie..." LOL

    Take a look at my "kitchen continent" (island top) project thread if you want to see a "big" glue-up. That surface was 52" wide by 80"+ long and about 1.75" thick VG D-fir.

    I actually find things this big cumbersome simply because I work alone and that makes for having to be creative with moving things around. But I like the end-result a lot more than I dislike the weight.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #50
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    Today was "big sander" day for the table top. My friends at Bucks County Hardwoods have a big old machine, so Professor Dr. SWMBO helped me load the thang into the back of my Grand Cherokee and off I went to pay them a visit. We ran a single pass on the bottom just to clean it up and then two passes on the top to get a surface ready for final sanding and finishing.

    Here, John and Morgan take care of running the top through the sander...it's not a quiet machine for sure!

    IMG_3530.jpg IMG_3531.jpg

    And the end-result...

    IMG_3532.jpg IMG_3533.jpg

    With any luck, I'll be coming close to eating off this table in a week to a week and a half.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #51
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    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    Looks great Jim,

    Oil I, oil, oil ,oil !!

    What is the brand on that sander. Looks pretty slick vrs the new tin can machines..

  7. #52
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    I honestly didn't see a name plate on the machine, Patrick, but I believe it's from something like the 1940s or something like that. It mechanically jiggles the two drums back and forth (sideways) via those articulated arms on the end of the machine (identical on the other side). Pretty interesting to watch and clearly powerful. Two passes removed about a thirty-second or so with no objectionable scratch pattern. It should sand out beautifully with the ROS.

    And yes, it will get oil for the first step for sure...that's my normal finishing regimen. Oil, a barrier coat of de-waxed shellac and then this top is getting several coats of EM8000cv.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #53
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    Feb 2015
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    Beantown
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    Next time, your there and think of it take a look and or a,picture of the name and name plate if you wouldn’t mind.

    Pretty slick a old machine with two heads that ossilate also. Wonder if that cost a pretty penny in its day or what?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I honestly didn't see a name plate on the machine, Patrick, but I believe it's from something like the 1940s or something like that. It mechanically jiggles the two drums back and forth (sideways) via those articulated arms on the end of the machine (identical on the other side). Pretty interesting to watch and clearly powerful. Two passes removed about a thirty-second or so with no objectionable scratch pattern. It should sand out beautifully with the ROS.

    And yes, it will get oil for the first step for sure...that's my normal finishing regimen. Oil, a barrier coat of de-waxed shellac and then this top is getting several coats of EM8000cv.

  9. #54
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    I bet it did have a healthy cost for its time, Patrick. Neat old machine. And yes, I will try to get a handle on exactly what it is next time I go there. John sold his tree business and is just focusing on the lumber business now and i expect I'll be buying more from him as I like to deal local when it's possible.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #55
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    Jan 2004
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    Lewiston, Idaho
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    Like Dan, I wonder how I managed to miss this thread! Looking great Jim! You will need help getting it into the house I'd bet!
    Ken

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    You will need help getting it into the house I'd bet!
    I carried the base in myself...since it has that nice "handle" on top, it wasn't a difficult task and the old, relatively dry timber wasn't as heavy as it would have been if it was "more recently harvested". You wouldn't believe how close the annular rings are on some of it! Brian Holcombe was here the other day and he immediately picked up on that particular thing. The top needs a second person to carry simply because it has weight and it's awkward...'has to go through the door(s) vertically.
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    Speaking of the top...sanded through 400 today after I took care of a few small defects with tinted epoxy and then oiled. The oil was also "rubbed in" with an 800 grit pad on the ROS. Silky. Smooth. Gotta love that 30-40 year old cherry (since it was cut/slabbed) ... simply beautiful.

    IMG_3543.jpg IMG_3544.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #57
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    Feb 2003
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    Jim, I had convinced myself that I wasn't going to like that top when you first layed it out, but after the oil treatment it's a knock out! Well done!

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Calver View Post
    Jim, I had convinced myself that I wasn't going to like that top when you first layed it out, but after the oil treatment it's a knock out! Well done!
    I was a little worried because of the two boards I had to insert to get the width required after getting rid of the "nasties". It would have been nice if I didn't have to make them two narrower boards, but the slab they came out of was uber-twisted and the only way to get flat boards from it was to rip it in half . I was then worried about them being lighter than the other material...that board probably was from a different tree than the other two slabs...but after sanding and oiling, things have evened up a lot and I suspect over time with UV, etc., it's not going to be a factor. I think it's working out.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #59
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    Yeah that looks great!

  15. #60
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    Apr 2017
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    Chapel Hill, NC
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    That really came out great Jim. Some nice figure to that Cherry. I bet in a year you won't see the color difference.

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