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Thread: Doug Fir Alaskan yellow cedar master build.

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Beautiful work, Patrick!
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  2. #62
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    Feb 2015
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    Thanks Brian,

    Coming from you that’s a real compliment. Not that it’s not a compliment from anyone but knowing the level you expect of yourself to work to it means all that much more.

    Back to work tomorrow. Would you believe I’m almost excited?!

    I must be sick.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Beautiful work, Patrick!

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    I agree, very nice work with a beautiful result. As for storing them until you hang them: first and most important is to put them somewhere they aren't going to get dinged. Preferably, put them in the same rooms where they will be installed. Second, I would build a rack of some sort so they are standing plumb and so that air can flow freely around them.

    Good luck the rest of the way.

    John

  4. #64
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    Feb 2015
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    Thanks John,

    I have the doors standing as upright as I can with complete air circulation.

    You are right about dings. I am knee deep in the process of applying a French polish. Ok well maybe just cracking the surface. But man just moving the doors around is a scary experience. Yeah I know French polish is pretty delicate. On the other hand it can be easily repaired. My gripe with modern finishes is although some very tuff by comparison to French polish they are a royal pita to repair if at all.

    I will shoot my self in the foot and buff my French polish out to a matt finish in the end. Most will say why the hell are you doing all that work then. To be honest I don’t know other than it’s imemsily satisfying and by the time I’m done with both sides of these five doors I should be a pro and have another task mastered.

    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I agree, very nice work with a beautiful result. As for storing them until you hang them: first and most important is to put them somewhere they aren't going to get dinged. Preferably, put them in the same rooms where they will be installed. Second, I would build a rack of some sort so they are standing plumb and so that air can flow freely around them.

    Good luck the rest of the way.

    John

  5. #65
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    Feb 2015
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    Proof I have not forgot about this project as a result of the saw project.

    I did nothing today but I have been getting many coats of shellac rubbed into one side of the two small French doors.

    I switch back to the doors for the weekend and take a break from the saw.

    Iíll,have to get a better picture but the depth this finish brings to the lumber is like nothing I have ever seen. If I have seen it I had no idea what I was looking at.

    A06F9F3C-8880-493F-A5CF-A73E9B5F98A6.jpg

    Oh this is pretty funny. I started my day behind this guy at a light. I mean who Iím the heck puts that on their car without thinking how is this gonna be received?

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    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #66
    Unbelievable work, sir. It's always bothered me when people say, "Oh, it's wood - it moves!," "Close enough!", etc. It seems like many people think woodworkers who use calipers, DROs, etc, are hacks or not real artisans, but, man, your work shows how wrong that view is. You have thoroughly inspired me to redouble my efforts to chase that level of perfection...

  7. #67
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Dan, I think you make a good point and clearly, the OP is careful with things like dimensions. The thing to remember about where "Oh, it's wood...it moves!" does come into play is that accurate measurements with a material that moves/changes is relative to the immediate time period of when you are doing the work. If one makes a very accurate measurement today, it may not be accurate next Tuesday. Or even tomorrow. So as long as we keep that in mind and measure "in the moment" all will be good and things will fit together really nicely. Case in point: I'm working on some CNC things for another 'Creeker right now and there is enough variation in the thickness from what he originally achieved to what it is "right now" that I've had to adjust accordingly for that thickness. I've had to do that more than once since the assemblies I'm doing my thing on came to my shop because the temperature and humidity are likely very different than in his shop situation a half-hour away. I have no doubt that our individual calipers might also be slightly part of the variations, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #68
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    Clearly I don’t agree with the it’s just wood it moves sentiment.

    I 100% take it into account and 100% try to plan and factor in what these changes will mean long term for the things I build.

    I agree with Jim and feel it’s pretty much basic Woodworking 101 that certain operations have to be started and finished in one sesion if you are really that hung up on everything fitting and or machining to perfection from one phase of a built to the next.

    Being a cabinet maker by trade “not furniture” I’m forced to think about bottom line vrs ultimate quality and or something that will last 300 years. The fact is most kitchens baths whatever will be in a landfill in 20 years plus or minus. This mentality/reality just turns my screws and makes me sick. It leaves me very disappointed in us all as humans to be honest but that’s getting it to a whole nothing thing I don’t think many want to hear me rant about.

    People want what they want these days, they want the image of quality, of no expense spaired of the ultimate but they really don’t want to pay for it when you explain the options and ins and out to them. It’s like a new Porsche vrs a 80’s porcelain or say my 70’s Martin T-75 vrs the guy the that just has to have the newest coolest loling new saw with digital this that and everything but is built like a tin can. I had to make that decision to and I just could bring myself to have any really lust or desire for the tin can even with all the cool gadgets.

    Anyway I’m ranting now so thank you all for the compliments. This weekend back at the finishing.

    Picture bellow of where my head is at. We will see after a couple samples?

    It’s gonna be a poop ton of work whatever I do. No rush though I have 8-12 weeks while I wait for hardware.

    2CE8C785-2219-44F3-B483-928A5ED0E2DB.jpg

  9. #69
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    Feb 2015
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    Holly he’ll,

    When you just don’t know what you don’t know is all I can think of this French polish thing.

    I think I’m banging my head off the wall with this one. Like the writing is on the wall. I have been able to achieve a very nice finish mirror like finish on the stiles and rails. Also on the panels for the most part. The problem is the last couple inches of each panel where I dead end into the rails.

    I predicted this or forsaw this before I even started. I figured it this way though. I put the two build coats on by brush prior to assembly. I figured it was a death sentance to think i was going to glue a perfectly French polished panel in a door so I buffed them to a even 320 and moved. I knew full well that if the French polish did not work out I could buff everything out to a mate finish and put whatever I want over the shellac.

    So here I am, I’m so close to a fin9sh I, just in love with but I can’t get to the 100% perfection I expect of myself with my own work. If this was a table top I’d have this thing wired and moving onto the next thing. But with the panel conundrum I think I’m beat this time. I don’t feel so bad as I knew I probably would be before I even got started but still. I hate wanting something so bad and having to accept it’s just not in the cards. For the most part I normally figure out how to get what I want even if the price is very very high. Normally it just means heaps of hard work and sacrifice. In this case I don’t think all the effort in the world is gonna cut it.

    So now what. Buff it out with 400 and use the renaissance wax to get a nice low luster or mid grade sheen. Oil, true oil or the tried and true over the shellac seems silly. I could spray everything with some kind of film finish but I’m just so apposed to that being it’s just not part of my vision for the project.

    Oh well, I’m sure I’ll figure something out. I’ll tell you this, even if I could get a perfect result it’s gonna take me a week or a couple hours here a couple hours there to finish just one door I’d say. That’s fine with me as I like busy. I will have to settle on do,thing else for the jambs and the rest of th trim and window sash. I made a sample with waterlox and it yellowed everything way to much. Really that leaves my lest favorite finish in the work. A base of shellac with conversion varnish over it. I just really hate to do it as I loath chemicals..


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  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Here’s a glimpse into the hardware.

    The large passage door will be this plate with a round knob and a mortised lockset. I switches out the upper lock knob with a oval peened knob.

    2EF04D6A-38ED-4F25-9BED-8E237DEBBEFA.jpg

    The two larger closet doors will have these smaller 6” plates with the round knob but centered on the plate. This will allow me to align or keep the knobs and bottom edges of the plates on the plain.

    1E082570-8D3F-4508-85FD-B27041A162DF.jpg

    The double or French closet door will be these plates much like the entry but instead of 2.5x10 back plates they are 1.5x10 and with the opposite opposing levers. I figured this would bring added interest to the doors.

    7ED13A61-D33D-4133-928E-E98BE33DD54B.jpg

    All the closet doors are just dummies. The doors and jambs will have rare earth magnets embedded in them top and bottom to keep them closed and from wanting to warp.

    The hinges are the oil rubbed bronze with a flat finial. The entry door will have a oak leaf motif that’s cast into them. I’ll try and find a link. They are very arts and crafts asainy and I think will be a nice touch as the entry door will be left open 99.9% of the time.

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    The hardware comes in about 10 different finish options. I went with what they call S3 oil rubbed bronze or dark bronze lol. The boar bellow giv4s a idea of the various/round oval/lever handle options and back plates.

    4FF80C70-5F42-4650-80CC-15E170AEFF3B.jpg

    This is not normal thing for me but I have been planning to build these doors for years now. I put the addition on the house over three years ago now and purchased the lumber for the doors and trim this time last year. Maybe just maybe I’ll actully finish the darn project by the end of next winter.

    When the doors are done I still have to build the chest of drawers, bench seat and mill and run all the trim including a new staircase skirt boars treads risers and all. Then the next huge expense will be hardwood flooring and lighting.

    The decorative hinge. I just had to have these, I have been looking at them for years a little at a time prepping myself to splurge on them. It makes me feel a little better that the hardware is made by a very small company largely by hand on as it’s all sand cast. I’m sure it’s far from hand made but at least I’m not supporting Walmart or the kock brothers but instead at least a few other hard working people like myself that just maybe love what they do?

    https://www.sunvalleybronze.com/cata...burr-oak-lodge
    Last edited by Patrick Walsh; 01-19-2019 at 6:31 PM.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Saturna Island, B.C.
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    327
    BLO does bring the colour out in fir. it will eventually turn it into a nice nut brown colour ( it just warms the colour right up). 1 st coat only then put your finish on top
    ron

  12. #72
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    Feb 2015
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    Hmm well two things.

    My first sample was just BLO. I actually did like it and probably more than the waterlox I’m currently experimenting with. I like waterlox quite a bit but it’s just not the look I’m going for on these doors.

    I almost doing a true oil over shellac finish. I know oil over shellac is ass backwards but I brushed two coats of shellac over everything already.

    To be honest i like the look of the two coats of de-waxed shellac buffed back with 0000 very very much. I just don’t think it’s going to hold up very well on doors.

    My real issue at this point with any finish that I don’t spray be it brushed or rubbed even wax to some extent is not getting drag marks where the panel comes into the stiles and rails or just a uneven finish if waxing or oiling.

    I like the true oil over the shellac but I’m having the same issue getting into the area where the panlesmcomes in the styles and rails as even as the finish is when I pre finish the panel sand back to the sheen I like then assemble. Next time I know to just Finish the panels all the way and not be scared of scratching something during glue up.

    At this point I think I’m going to have to spray the doors. As is such I have to decide on a product that will not change the color/tone or general look of the two coats of shellac Sanded with 0000 steel wool.

    Seems to me I have two options. A water based non yellowing product or conversion varnish with like a 20% sheen..

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