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Thread: WoodRiver vs Lie Nielsen block plane

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    Coffee City, Texas
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    169
    Another point Adam,

    Second tier tools may require the same sort of tuning as an antique to get them to operate properly. The savings in buying them is mitigated by time spent tuning them up plus materials used in the process. I recommend against buying any second tier tools until you are geared up to do some tuning and then you can make the value judgement based on the free time you have to devote to the task. It is probably not worth it in my opinion for a block plane.
    Dojo Kun, 1: Be humble and polite.

  2. #32
    Hi Adam,
    I am a fan of the WR planes, but I wouldn't suggest their block plane to you based on what I have read. If you have a Woodcraft store near you, I agree with others that you should drive over and try one first.

    Here's a less expensive LN that lets you dip a toe in the water: buy an LN102 for $115. This is an excellent tool at a good price. I bought one as my first foray into good tools. I've never been disapointed. I have since purchased other block planes and they all have their uses/place. But I still use this tool regularly. You must keep it sharp to have it work well. But you have to learn to sharpen regardless.

    Best of luck on your decision!
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    725
    Given your current situation, I would just buy the Wood River plane. The cost is less and it will serve your needs. I have not had problems with the Wood River cap popping off and have been very satisfied with for what appears to be about the same uses you plan to put it to. Also, if you can wait, the Wood River plane may go on sale. I bought mine for either 10% or 15% off the regular price when Woodcraft was having a sale.

    Restoring is a great process if that is what you want to do with your time. For me, working with wood is more interesting and satisfying than restoring tools.

    I wouldn't agonize over it. I'm sure the Wood River plane will do the job you want it to as long as you keep the blade sharp. Regardless of which plane you buy, be prepared to learn about sharpening if you don't already know much about it. It is a necessity to make a plane work as desired.
    Last edited by Randy Heinemann; 12-28-2018 at 10:39 AM.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    108
    WoodRiver block plane is perfectly usable. I have it, along with the LN, Veritas DX, and an old Stanley 60 1/2. If I'm blindfolded and forced to pick one at random to use, I wouldn't notice any discernible difference except for the shape of each plane.

  5. #35
    Can't remember if Rob Cosman has ever been seen using a WR block plane in one of his videos, but he has used WR (V3) planes (5-1/4 or larger) to produce pristine surface, and the edge shavings were full-width and continuous for the length of the stock. Similar to what Brian noted, there is no way you can tell whether his shavings were done with a WR, LN, or Veritas. I heard that one should stay away from the earlier generations of the WR (ie prior to Cosman's involvement).

    Simon

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Southwest Virginia
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Can't remember if Rob Cosman has ever been seen using a WR block plane in one of his videos, but he has used WR (V3) planes (5-1/4 or larger) to produce pristine surface, and the edge shavings were full-width and continuous for the length of the stock. Similar to what Brian noted, there is no way you can tell whether his shavings were done with a WR, LN, or Veritas. I heard that one should stay away from the earlier generations of the WR (ie prior to Cosman's involvement).

    Simon
    I used his #6 at a class to level some dovetails. It was very nice. He did mention using a LN rabbet plane for the tail boards. I'm not sure if WR makes a rabbet plane though.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Heinemann View Post
    Given your current situation, I would just buy the Wood River plane. The cost is less and it will serve your needs.

    Also, if you can wait, the Wood River plane may go on sale. I bought mine for either 10% or 15% off the regular price when Woodcraft was having a sale.
    Randy made a good catch here about the sale price and he has first hand experience with the WR. If there's no sale when you need it, I'd go right to the LN102. (The LN 102 is $115 and the WR is $102.) And when you're ready for a bench plane, there's absolutely nothing wrong with the WRs - especially on sale. I personally prefer the Veritas (Lee Valley), but I get good use out of both my WR #3 and my WR #1. (I often use the #1 like a block plane. )

    Edit: LINK for my review of the WR #3, for reference when you are ready for a bench plane.
    Last edited by Frederick Skelly; 12-28-2018 at 6:34 PM.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Australia
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    2,534

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Stewie Simpson View Post
    Thanks.

    Rob gives the same recommendation as I earlier did (regardless of brands): get the low angle... plus a spare blade.

    Check WC if any sale is on its way.

    Edit: Veritas does have the advantages of the set screws, chamfer guide (as an option), PMV11 blades (unless those blades also fit WR's), and optional handle to use it like a #3 (couldn't find it on its site for some reason).

    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 12-28-2018 at 7:29 PM.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Thanks.

    Rob gives the same recommendation as I earlier did (regardless of brands): get the low angle... plus a spare blade.

    Check WC if any sale is on its way.

    Edit: Veritas does have the advantages of the set screws, chamfer guide (as an option), PMV11 blades (unless those blades also fit WR's), and optional handle to use it like a #3 (couldn't find it on its site for some reason).

    Simon
    In my opinion set screws ain't no advantage, just a marketing tool enabled by CNC production. Never owned a plane with them and never thought that I needed them. And never suffered for a lack of them.

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Fournier View Post
    In my opinion set screws ain't no advantage, just a marketing tool enabled by CNC production. Never owned a plane with them and never thought that I needed them. And never suffered for a lack of them.
    Right, the set screws aren't essential, nor is the stop-screw that prevents the mouth from hitting the blade (which is another advantage). But those set screws are there to keep the blade from shifting in use when you tighten the lever cap a "hair" loose. By that I mean with the snug clamping, I can still advance or retract the blade on the fly to the desired depth of cut without loosening the lever cap knob or the lever cap.

    Because the set screws hold the blade in position, I am also able to make finer, controlled adjustments with the Norris style adjuster (usually with a hammer). In addition, after I do a quick hone on the blade, I can replace it in the exact (lateral) position in the body, which may matter for those who use cambered edges.


    Simon
    Last edited by Simon MacGowen; 12-28-2018 at 9:07 PM.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
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    74
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Can't remember if Rob Cosman has ever been seen using a WR block plane in one of his videos, but he has used WR (V3) planes (5-1/4 or larger) to produce pristine surface, and the edge shavings were full-width and continuous for the length of the stock. Similar to what Brian noted, there is no way you can tell whether his shavings were done with a WR, LN, or Veritas. I heard that one should stay away from the earlier generations of the WR (ie prior to Cosman's involvement).

    Simon
    That's where I first heard of wood river. Got hooked on watching some of his videos last year, he can make some really nice stuff. Didn't notice what block plane he uses, but I've heard him say multiple times WoodRiver is the best performance for the money, and then States his bias right after that.
    For the moment, I've kind of put the brands on the back burner and started searching sharpening materials and methods, and wondering what the hell im getting myself in to.

  13. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Grund View Post
    That's where I first heard of wood river. Got hooked on watching some of his videos last year, he can make some really nice stuff. Didn't notice what block plane he uses, but I've heard him say multiple times WoodRiver is the best performance for the money, and then States his bias right after that.
    For the moment, I've kind of put the brands on the back burner and started searching sharpening materials and methods, and wondering what the hell im getting myself in to.
    Good luck with your shopping.

    Sharpening?! You will hear a lot more opinions about it than WR vs LN!

    Simon

  14. #44
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    Jun 2017
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    Northeast Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon MacGowen View Post
    Good luck with your shopping.

    Sharpening?! You will hear a lot more opinions about it than WR vs LN!

    Simon
    Yeah No joke!

  15. #45
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    I would go to a store where I can pick one up. That way you will know when you find one you like.

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