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Thread: Looking for suggestions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Bedford, NH
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    Looking for suggestions

    I recently got into chip carving and have carved a number of line drawings of animals, letters, etc. After carving the lines, I apply several fine coats of clear spray lacquer, let it dry, then apply a latex paint to the lines, wipe off the excess using rubbing alcohol to clean it up, let that dry, then apply a couple more coats of lacquer on top of the latex paint.

    I'm now trying to carve a line drawing I made of my daughters face where I trace a line along the main features. However, there are a number of, let's call them shady areas, such as where her hair is between/along her cheek & ear, or along her forehead. I can't simply make a line that would represent this "shaded" area. Does anyone have a suggestion how to do this, or is there a carving tool that could "scrape" an area to represent her hair? If so I could lightly color the shaded area in a similar manner. I was thinking of using a narrow chisel, but there must be a better way???

    I'd appreciate any and all suggestions.
    Thoughts entering one's mind need not exit one's mouth!
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    "We Live In The Land Of The Free, Only Because Of The Brave"
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  2. #2
    Al,

    Pyrography comes to mind immediately. I think that it might come up eventually in your work, anyway. Also, there are checkering tools that I know about because they are used to engrave wooden gunstocks. I think you know that I am a rank beginner in woodcarving, but you said you would appreciate any and all suggestions.

    Best regards

    Doug

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Bedford, NH
    Posts
    1,119
    Thanks Doug, I do appreciate your suggestions.

    Pyrography is a very interesting idea! I'll have to look further into that. I'm not sure how I would use a checkering tool as the lines would be a bit too bold, plus I couldn't do a decent job of keeping them close & parallel to imitate hair.

    I was even thinking of a coarse sandpaper, perhaps 60-80 grit that I could swipe on the would to produce "hair lines". I was also thinking that perhaps a welder's steel brush dragged over the area. or a wire brush on a portable drill. I haven't tried either, but think I would lose control with either of these methods & really end up filling my scrap wood pile very quickly.

    I wonder if a Dremel bit of some kind would work???

    I just found this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KxqxOu19jg. I think this has a "LOT" of promise. Your idea is not only interesting, I think it is outstanding! I have several "electronic' soldering irons, but no tip as shown in the video, so I'm going to get one. This technique is far better than I'd hoped for. Thank you very much!
    Last edited by Al Launier; 12-22-2018 at 2:56 PM.
    Thoughts entering one's mind need not exit one's mouth!
    As I age my memory fades .... and that's a load off my mind!

    "We Live In The Land Of The Free, Only Because Of The Brave"
    “The problems we face today are there because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living."
    "
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

  4. #4
    Not sure this is exactly what you’re looking for but it’s pretty basic to all art/sketching for shadows. Lines and cross hatch as well as dots. Same as the shadows on any currency image .Ever look at a dollar bill? It too was a carving /etch that needed shading. Can be done with either a chisel or burning tool depending on size or level of shading you desire. Here are a couple examples showing how effective a few lines can be to define an area.
    and if you go and look at any of Leonardo’s sketches he defines entire faces/ bodies/ surfaces with just series of parallel lines which tell you exactly what the surface is like and in shadow . Amazing what hundreds of years of history can teach us about problems they too faced and solved beautifully. Just do what they did.
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    Last edited by Mark Yundt; 12-22-2018 at 8:31 PM.
    The Woodworking Studio

  5. #5
    It’s also seen here where I scrimshawed this less than 1/4” high ribbon on a razor scale where some lines and dots show shadow and make the ribbon appear to curve and swirl a bit.
    same too for the whale although they do have these lines along their bellies it also adds to the depth and curvature on a 1” x 3/8” carving. From normal viewing distances it works well.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    The Woodworking Studio

  6. #6
    BTW Al. That tip you see in the video isn’t a replacement for “electronic” soldering tool tips. A conventional soldering iron , should you fabricate some tip is way too hot. Years ago I did have some success with an iron I was able to unscrew the tip (8/32nds?) and take a brass screw, flatten one end of it, file it to a knife edge and then connect the iron to a rheostat I made from a fan speed controller to modulate the heat.
    After that I did acquire a true pyography controller and a variety of pens with fixed tips ( the best type) and several with replaceable tips of various shapes For burning lines ( sharpened them like a knife) ad some broad tips for shading. Being able to control the power you can go from lightly shading or lining a piece of wood to nearly making it go up in flames.
    here you can see one style of pen with replaceable tips and the others are fixed tips. In the background is the controller.
    And on the sample you can see how delicate and fine you can burn in detail on these old pieces I never finished.
    Last edited by Mark Yundt; 12-23-2018 at 3:19 PM.
    The Woodworking Studio

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