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Thread: Shot glass finish

  1. #1
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    Shot glass finish

    I am thinking that epoxy would be the only suitable finish for a turned wood shot glass. Thoughts anyone?
    Last edited by Stevan Hopkins; 12-19-2018 at 3:03 PM.

  2. #2
    I am learning more and more about metal spinning. There is a way to press a pewter or thin sliver liner into wooden chalices, cups etc. and then crimp the liner over the rim. I saw only one video so far on doing it. and with the right prep it did not appear to require a rocket science degree.

  3. #3
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    With metal spinning you usually spin the metal onto the outside of a form. You could shape the form like the inside of the shot glass. I haven't seen it done the other way where you push the metal into a form. Not sure that's possible because you would have to stretch the metal too much. A friend who's name escapes me this morning did a series of tests trying to find a finish for wine goblets and shot glasses that would not only be alcohol resisitant but would also not show a stain from the wine and not impart any taste to the wine. The finish he found was to wipe down the inside with several coats of thin CA glue. Then pour melted Carnauba wax into the goblet, let is sit for a few second and then pour it out. let it sit for a few seconds and then wipe out any excess. He tried lots of finishes like epoxy and straight CA and others and this was by far the most superior.

  4. #4
    I made a whisky glass for myself from walnut. Unfinished. Works for me. I burnished the outside, but am treating it like a cooking spoon - no finish.

  5. #5
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    Thank you John, I will try your friendís CA & wax method

  6. #6
    When makeing shot glasses do you calculate the volume to hold an ounce, or just wing it and make it look/ feel right?

  7. #7
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    making a specific volume

    Quote Originally Posted by mike falconer View Post
    When makeing shot glasses do you calculate the volume to hold an ounce, or just wing it and make it look/ feel right?
    Hey Mike, I haven't made a shot glass but your question reminded me of the method I used to get the volume right when carving some coffee scoops: I filled the scoop that came with the coffee maker with silly putty then hollowed the bowl until the silly putty just fit. This method should work nicely for a turned or carved wooden shot glass, scoop, teaspoon, measuring cup, etc.

    (We've used one of these every morning since 2007.)

    coffee_scoops_PB010307sB.jpg coffee_scoops_PB044022comp_s.jpg

    JKJ

  8. #8
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    Mike, in this case, my brother likes to sip his whiskey in a small shot type glass, so I just wung it. (Wung it is past tense for wing it...right?)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevan Hopkins View Post
    ... so I just wung it. (Wung it is past tense for wing it...right?)
    Well you got my curiosity up so I looked around a bit.

    The answer I liked the best:

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Is it wung it or winged it? What is the past tense of the phrase "wing it"? What is the rule here?

    Winged it. You are analogizing "to wing" with various strong verbs like "to sing" or "to ring." But "to wing" is not one of those verbs.
    Also, if it were one of those verbs, it wouldn't be "wung it"--it would be "wang it" or "had wung it." (But it still isn't.)

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I kinda thinked that might be it. Or maybe I thunked it.

    JKJ

  10. #10
    I wouldnt use anything on a shot glass and risk the potential contamination if the finish were to slowly dissolve over time. But that's just me and my amateur thinking. I'm very conservative with items that contact food.

    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  11. #11
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    Epoxy isn't a food safe finish. I don't know what else to recommend.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Lisowski View Post
    Epoxy isn't a food safe finish. I don't know what else to recommend.
    Why would you say that?

    Epoxy resins are used to coat the inside of metal food containers – like canned food and metal bottle caps.

    i wouldn’t recommend drinking epoxy from the bottle, but once cured it is completely inert.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Balzonia View Post


    Why would you say that?

    Epoxy resins are used to coat the inside of metal food containers – like canned food and metal bottle caps.

    i wouldn’t recommend drinking epoxy from the bottle, but once cured it is completely inert.


    I have heard this from several people, it is more the chemical reaction and off gassing. Let's say you turn a platter and use epoxy as the finish, could you place fruit or cookies for a short time with no issues, yes, but drinking out of a glass over and over could cause issues.

  14. #14
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    Food safe epoxy?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Lisowski View Post
    I have heard this from several people, it is more the chemical reaction and off gassing. Let's say you turn a platter and use epoxy as the finish, could you place fruit or cookies for a short time with no issues, yes, but drinking out of a glass over and over could cause issues.
    What kind of resin might cause what kind of problem? "Resins" are widely used in the food industry, some in and on things that are consumed, some are specifically certified as food grade. Try a search for resins in food industry.

    What about epoxy? I read lots of speculation, high on opinion but short on information.

    Ask King Google about food safe epoxy and is epoxy food safe. It turns out there is even an FDA specification for food safe epoxy.

    Some are certified and are advertised as food safe, for example: https://theepoxyexperts.com/shop/adh...mpact-coating/

    Also, this has been asked and discussed on SMC and other forums more than just once or twice. Here is one somewhat recent thread:
    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....glue-food-safe

    BTW, possibly of interest: The System 3 people tell how to make turned wooden things waterproof and even dishwasher safe. The note by John Lucas about carnauba wax is interesting since it is widely used to coat food products like M&Ms. https://www.thrillist.com/cars/every...ar-wax-is-used
    If concerned about the epoxy resin, perhaps consider the carnauba wax coating.

    JKJ

  15. #15
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    Read through the links. Provided you mix the right ratio and allow to fully cure you should be fine. So obviously my previous opinions were wrong.

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