Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 70

Thread: Share your stupid moments

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,992
    Blog Entries
    5

    Share your stupid moments

    I always say, "I love a good laugh, especially when it's on me." Here's my latest "duh moment." I spent a long time with a combination plane hand-rabbeting some pine boards for building a steam box. (Note: I do this by hand because I enjoy it and not for bravado.) All I had to do was drill the holes for the dowels that will hold the items being steamed suspended so heat can get all around them. In order to make the holes match up on either side, I clamped the two boards together, and drilled all the holes through both boards at the same time. Yes sir, I'm smart like that. So smart. I'm so proud of how smart I am...

    ...and then I went to assemble the thing. Turns out I clamped the boards together both facing one way, when the rabbets should have been facing inwards, so one board is okay, but the other doesn't match when you put it the correct way. UGH!!! SO- this morning I made another board, and tonight I'll clamp it to the other board the RIGHT way, and match the holes up.

    So- what stupid thing have you folks done lately?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    899
    Why wouldn't you plug the holes and drill new rather than make another side? A second stupid perhaps?

  3. #3
    I was making some small boxes with thin plywood bottoms. Since the plywood was thin, I clamped a strip of MDF to my table saw fence to make sure the plywood wouldn't slip under the fence. Then I set the fence using the rip scale and cut the plywood. For some unknown reason the plywood was 3/4" too small, in both dimensions! DUH.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,992
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Christensen View Post
    Why wouldn't you plug the holes and drill new rather than make another side? A second stupid perhaps?
    I thought that might get asked. (a) this is a two-level steam box 8' long with a hole for each level every foot, so there are 16 holes per side. (b) Since it's a steam box, I figured the wood might move and the plugs come out. There isn't a glue I would trust to glue them in with that much heat. (c) I'm a perfectionist to a flaw.

    ...mostly c It would have bothered me, even though this is a purely functional piece. It would make my OCD hurt. The other board won't get wasted- it will be cut up to make the end caps and whatever is left will be saved for blocking, drilling blocks, or whatever use I find.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,992
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    I was making some small boxes with thin plywood bottoms. Since the plywood was thin, I clamped a strip of MDF to my table saw fence to make sure the plywood wouldn't slip under the fence. Then I set the fence using the rip scale and cut the plywood. For some unknown reason the plywood was 3/4" too small, in both dimensions! DUH.
    Why didn't you just run them through the wood stretcher? :-)

  6. #6
    I shared my stupid moment on Thankgiving.... when I decided it was a good idea to take the tip of my finger off with my Jointer.

    I had the stitched removed last Thursday. I would have done it myself but my finger looked necrotic. Turns out it wasn't. They said the stitches weren't doing anything anymore. It wasn't healing properly and doing some kind of secondary healing from underneath. Well, it only took 36 hours after suture removal for my finger tip to come loose. The gauze slightly sliding back and forth pulled it away. My finger is totally jacked now and nothing can be done.

    Personally, I'd like them to give me another full digit block and I can clean some shět up with my dremel and sew it back together myself. Use 25 vs 8 stitches. Lol

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm Schweizer View Post
    Why didn't you just run them through the wood stretcher? :-)
    Yeah, I've been thinking of getting one of those but can't decide whether to get the 18V cordless model or the gas powered one. which do you recommend?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,992
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Costa View Post
    I shared my stupid moment on Thankgiving.... when I decided it was a good idea to take the tip of my finger off with my Jointer.

    I had the stitched removed last Thursday. I would have done it myself but my finger looked necrotic. Turns out it wasn't. They said the stitches weren't doing anything anymore. It wasn't healing properly and doing some kind of secondary healing from underneath. Well, it only took 36 hours after suture removal for my finger tip to come loose. The gauze slightly sliding back and forth pulled it away. My finger is totally jacked now and nothing can be done.

    Personally, I'd like them to give me another full digit block and I can clean some shět up with my dremel and sew it back together myself. Use 25 vs 8 stitches. Lol
    Oh man, that's not good. I'm sorry to hear that. I lost the tip of my thumb in my younger years and they made me a new one out of skin from my left arm. The thumb looked so bad for a while I called it "Frankenthumb." Now you can't tell which thumb was hurt and which one wasn't. I am amazed at the body's ability to heal. I do seem to remember that mine healed from the inside out. In my case, after the accident there was a small sliver of skin left covering the bone. I was told that if there is no skin over the bone, they have to remove the whole tip and can't just do a skin graft.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    279
    I was making a set of double-hung window sashes. I had recently gotten a little power feeder and was having such great fun (and success) climb cutting the sticking profile that I cut it on all of the pieces of all of the sashes and then assembled them (with draw-bored through mortise & tenons). When I went to apply the little meeting rail molding, I realized that I should not have cut the sticking profile on the inside of the bottom rails of the upper sashes.

    Luckily, the sashes I was reproducing had a somewhat non-standard design: the bottom rails were mortised for tenons at the ends of the stiles. I had an extra piece of the CVG Douglas fir that I was using, so I made new (unmolded except for the glass rabbet) bottom rails. I used a track saw to cut off the old rails & attached the new rails with draw-bored dominos. These were paint-grade, so the fix is not visible in the finished windows.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    US Virgin Islands
    Posts
    2,992
    Blog Entries
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Garson View Post
    Yeah, I've been thinking of getting one of those but can't decide whether to get the 18V cordless model or the gas powered one. which do you recommend?
    The gas model is much more powerful. I have a buddy that built his whole house with just one 2x4 using a gas stretcher. His neighbor barely was able to get a shed out of his 18V cordless.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    376
    I have made the same mistake as you with drawer sides. Time does not permit me the report all of the duhs nor will my mood benefit by reviewing them.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    1,732

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    5,289
    My stupid moments revolve around the idea of measure once cut once.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    411
    My most recent stupid moment was a few weeks ago. I was in the process of making shaker style doors for some built-ins I'm working on for the office. Not wanting to run out to the lumber yard for lumber and having to wait a few weeks for it to acclimate, I dug up enough 8/4 scrap hard maple to make the doors. After hours of planning and laying out how to cut the boards, what to resaw to get 3/4" thick profiles, I went to work. I spent about 4 hours cutting, jointing, planning, resawing, more planning and finally ripping down to size on the TS. I had all my parts made and cut to "rough" length" so decided to take a break and grab some lunch. After lunch, I sat down at my computer in the office and started looking at the base cabinets already installed. I had a tape measure laying around so I decided to double check my measurement....... turns out all my stiles were cut around 1" too short. I had a drawing I had done on CAD in the shop and use it as a reference for measurements and the drawings had door heights on them. I even cut the stiles about 1" longer than needed for final cut. The mistake I made was I changed the drawer height above the doors and made them 1.5" smaller, I also reduced the toe-kick 1/2" shorter as well. This lead to a 2" difference in height from the plans to the actual opening of the cabinets. Needless to say my whole day was shot and I said, I'm done for the day. I haven't touched the project since and now have a pile of wood on my rack acclimating before I can start again. Hopefully this week would yield better results.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 12-12-2018 at 5:43 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Central Missouri, U.S.
    Posts
    1,148
    My most expensive one involved a blade embedded in a SawStop brake cartridge. Happily, no digits were involved.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •