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Thread: A Timberframed Woodworking Shop - Build Thread

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    2,205
    Glad to see this going Brent (just found this thread here). What an amazing project and surely satisfying it is.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by mreza Salav View Post
    Glad to see this going Brent (just found this thread here). What an amazing project and surely satisfying it is.
    Thanks Mo, it's an exciting stage that's for sure!

    I'll be going at it pretty hard in the new year but hope to provide regular updates.

    B

  3. #63
    I'd be very interested in seeing the progress. I also wanted to build a real timber frame shop but opted for a sorta approach. I made my own trusses and oversized the 2x8 members by doubling them up with a 2x8 bottom cord spacer. I added the weld plates and kept the timber decking.It saved me about $10K on the build but I still got what I was going for. I don't have full pics as Im still finishing but this pic gives you a bit of an idea of what Im working on. Im sure your pics will make me want to re-visit my decision though. Good luck.
    IMG_4299.jpg

  4. #64
    Hi Robert, your shop looks great! It retains much of the look and feel of the classic timberframe.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,003
    Quote Originally Posted by brent stanley View Post
    Hi Robert, your shop looks great! It retains much of the look and feel of the classic timberframe.
    I was thinking the same thing...'kinda a modern version that doesn't require the heavy beams and other components that are harder (or a lot more work) to obtain in many areas. There's some pretty good looking hardware available these days to put this all together with, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    columbia, sc
    Posts
    577
    Brent

    very exciting. I GCd the building on my house which if TF scissor truss. Mostly Doug fir but I had some huge white oaks (same woodmizer you show) that got used in the basement (the bents sit on these) plus a deck. Part of my project was done by big CNC and part we did by hand. You looking a any of the nice Makita TF tools?

    i was very worried at first about inspections requiring stamps and grading but it was never an issue.

    if youre ever on SC drop by. BTW I did all the ceilings in cypress which is plentiful down here and it is a nice compliment to the DF and painted drywall.
    Last edited by Bob Cooper; 12-30-2018 at 2:57 PM.
    Bob C

  7. #67
    Thanks all. Brent Im looking forward to seeing the authentic Timber Frame. Are you worried about Moisture content? I Love timber Frame. I spent the day today finishing up the DC system. I added the lat 12' with 2-1/2" PVC (everything else was 6" runs reduced to 4" at machines) to pick up the scroll saw, table from Ban Saw, and drill press. Im hoping not to have to ground this section. We'll see how it performs.

  8. #68
    First video up!

    Lots to learn about making decent videos, but I'll get there!

    https://youtu.be/L12ArwEAb6M


    B

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cooper View Post
    Brent

    very exciting. I GC’d the building on my house which if TF— scissor truss. Mostly Doug fir but I had some huge white oaks (same woodmizer you show) that got used in the basement (the bents sit on these) plus a deck. Part of my project was done by big CNC and part we did “by hand”. You looking a any of the nice Makita TF tools?

    i was very worried at first about inspections requiring stamps and grading but it was never an issue.

    if you’re ever on SC drop by. BTW I did all the ceilings in cypress which is plentiful down here and it is a nice compliment to the DF and painted drywall.

    Hi Bob, I own a number of the main Makita timber framing tools and while not as refined as the Mafell stuff, they're workhorses. What I hope to do in the video series is cover some of the quirks of these tools and how I've come to work around them over the past few years of using them. This project I did last year gave them all a workout!

    20180715_183645.jpg

    image_109866.jpg

    B

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by ROBERT WRUBLOWSKY View Post
    Thanks all. Brent Im looking forward to seeing the authentic Timber Frame. Are you worried about Moisture content? I Love timber Frame. I spent the day today finishing up the DC system. I added the lat 12' with 2-1/2" PVC (everything else was 6" runs reduced to 4" at machines) to pick up the scroll saw, table from Ban Saw, and drill press. Im hoping not to have to ground this section. We'll see how it performs.
    The moisture content seems really good....the beams are WAY lighter than they used to be! In fact I expect they're dryer than ideal.

    I spent the day getting the space a little better organized and ought to be able to start drawing on timbers before too long! Getting excited!

    B

  11. #71
    Brent just watched the first video. In your design, you have the posts in the center, could you explain why you decided not to do a clear span building? Also are you pouring a slab first or doing concrete piers for the post locations?

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Lisowski View Post
    Brent just watched the first video. In your design, you have the posts in the center, could you explain why you decided not to do a clear span building? Also are you pouring a slab first or doing concrete piers for the post locations?

    Hi Bryan, I've done hammer beam trusses before and they are impressive but I was looking for simple and straightforward, utilitarian kinda building, also I wanted the floor space upstairs. Using steel Ibeams to achieve the clear span just isn't my thing. A few people have registered concerns with the posts downstairs, but in reality two of the four posts are on exterior walls which leaves only two posts to work around in the whole floor space, so no big deal. Great places to run electrical and attach DC ducting etc.

    The foundation will be rubble trench with the exception of a concrete stem wall above grade, enlarged at post bottoms. I took a course in stone construction and am tempted to try that, but the simplicity of concrete may well win out!

    I know everyone wants me to do concrete for the floor, but I really want a wooden floor in a shop I'm going to spend time in. I bought a huge lot of 10/4 white oak at an auction that I"m going to resaw and turn into T&G for the flooring, probably overtop of T&G ply.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Crozet, VA
    Posts
    188
    Loved the first video. This is so fun to watch. Thanks for sharing, Brent.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by brent stanley View Post
    Hi Bryan, I've done hammer beam trusses before and they are impressive but I was looking for simple and straightforward, utilitarian kinda building, also I wanted the floor space upstairs. Using steel Ibeams to achieve the clear span just isn't my thing. A few people have registered concerns with the posts downstairs, but in reality two of the four posts are on exterior walls which leaves only two posts to work around in the whole floor space, so no big deal. Great places to run electrical and attach DC ducting etc.

    The foundation will be rubble trench with the exception of a concrete stem wall above grade, enlarged at post bottoms. I took a course in stone construction and am tempted to try that, but the simplicity of concrete may well win out!

    I know everyone wants me to do concrete for the floor, but I really want a wooden floor in a shop I'm going to spend time in. I bought a huge lot of 10/4 white oak at an auction that I"m going to resaw and turn into T&G for the flooring, probably overtop of T&G ply.
    Thanks Brent. I agree that a steel I beam would look out of place, I figured with the size of the beams in a TF going 30' clear span would be no issue, and still be able to use the second floor. Then again I'm no engineer and I have never taken a TF class.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,807
    How much snow will the roof have to hold? Being from California I either see stuff for none or tons. Many folks outside of California do not understand that the mountains can have 30-50' of snow in a season and for the most part it does not melt off until spring.

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