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Thread: A Timberframed Woodworking Shop - Build Thread

  1. #106
    Well, in the end, the rotor for the CC needed to go into a machine shop for some work.....it is 70 years old after all!
    So somewhat miraculously, the whole unit was still very true. He chucked it up and everything was less than 2thou so he left it....he was very surprised based on the looks and age. He reestablished centres on the ends, kissed all the pertinent faces to remove burrs and dings. He touched up the main threads on the business end of the shaft but had to heavily rework the brake end threads on both the shaft and the lock nut. He reground the brake so it's now ready to be used again. The small machine screw that holds the key way in as well as the one that is part of the lock nut were completely buggered so he rethreaded those holes and inserted a new machine screw. He also pressed on the inner flange and ground its face to fix a warp and make it perfect with respect to the shaft. He also touched up the outter flange to make it mate perfectly with the inner one. Finally he got a socket head cap screw that threaded into the hole where the drive pin used to be and turned the head down so an Allen can still be used to remove it. He also cut some key stock for the shaft. $475 taxes in seemed very reasonable for the work involved. Pics below.

    20190219_210119.jpg

    20190219_210305.jpg

    20190219_210426.jpg

    20190219_210603.jpg

    All back together.

    20190221_132819.jpg
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,287
    A machinist can do some pretty amazing things. There's youtube channel, Abom79, that I like to watch. Better than most TV.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,616
    That seems like a critical part that makes sense to get checked and attended to while you have the machine torn down since it is right smack in the middle of the "business end" of the function.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #109
    Well folks, I'm still alive and I apologize for the long delay, but I had quite the adventure this winter. I spent about 4 months on my back with two herniated discs, only standing up long enough to visit the doctor and neurologist. It has happened before, but never to this degree and while moving the timbers may well have aggravated it, it wasn't what did it. Since I managed to get up and around again and got tentative approval from the Dr.'s to get back to some work I have been busier than a one-legged grape stomper just catching up. But I have returned to work and gathered some footage of the next steps.

    The four main tie beams are now planed and ready for layout!

    B

    20190624_160242.jpg
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  5. #110
    Hey Brent,

    Sorry to hear about the back. It is so easy to lift too much or do too much. I had two herniated discs in my neck that had to be removed and and the vertibrae fused. I like to think my problem was caused by my neck having to carry around my huge head and brain all these years. My surgery was largely successful. Hope your treatment is successful also.

    TW

  6. #111
    Thanks for the note Thom, I'm still getting around ok, but it's really hard to be disciplined with respect to lifting techniques, or asking for help with some of the heavy timbers. I have to remember that taking a few minutes to be smarter will still not add up to as much time as lying on my back for 4 months in agony....
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,354
    Please be careful with your back. Once injured your back will always be at risk especially since you have herniated discs.

    Please believe me as I have a bad back( screws, links, battery, computer etc.)

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,616
    I don't think that one-legged grape stomping pays very well...

    Seriously, 'glad you're on the mend and looking forward to the next steps of this journey both here and in the videos.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #114
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I don't think that one-legged grape stomping pays very well...

    Seriously, 'glad you're on the mend and looking forward to the next steps of this journey both here and in the videos.
    Thanks Jim, it's been a busy couple of months! Got to play.....er....use the new toy though.

    https://youtu.be/qxTmV5fINQo

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  10. #115
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    Hey Brent,

    Sorry to hear about the back. It is so easy to lift too much or do too much. I had two herniated discs in my neck that had to be removed and and the vertibrae fused. I like to think my problem was caused by my neck having to carry around my huge head and brain all these years. My surgery was largely successful. Hope your treatment is successful also.

    TW
    I meant to say how much I've enjoyed your shop thread Thom. Those scissor -style trusses are quite popular these days!

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  11. #116
    Time for some ,layout on the big ties!

    B

    20190701_155921.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  12. #117
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    49,616
    I'm guessing this is definitely a "measure thrice (at least), cut once" kinda situation...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #118
    Prepping the tie beams for layout:

    https://youtu.be/hjnO3IVUhWE

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

  14. #119
    If anyone's interested in the different approaches to layout in timberframing, I talk about some of the popular ones in my latest video before starting to describe my approach: https://youtu.be/76Q4il-CqXw

    I'd love to hear if you found it interesting and if anything is unclear!

    B
    https://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

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