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Thread: Horse hair/mane

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Atlanta, GA
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    Horse hair/mane

    Am making an attempt to carve the bottom item below, but am stuck on how to carve the hair/mane.

    The top one is walnut (I ditched it, and started over): the bottom mahogany.

    Clearly, the eyes/mouth, well, I need more practice.

    In addition to the above disclaimers, I copied the graphic from somewhere.

    So, can you all give me some guidance and or possible pictures on how to best represent the hair/mane?

    Have a lot of Basswood/butternut, but it is not quite wide enough, and is rather bland, right?

    I suppose there are two questions here:

    How to carve the hair/mane

    Desirability of such a carving in basswood/butternut-bland, but way easier.....a very talented master in the Renaissance did a lot of exquisite Lime wood (Basswood) carvings....I am not him.

    Here is what I have, which is just carving strands of hair w a #12 or #16 gouge:

    Walnut hair.jpg

    Mahogany Hair.JPG

    I guess what I have now is a sort of negative representation of hair?

    All input appreciated!

    Thanks, David
    David
    Confidence: That feeling you get before fully understanding a situation (Anonymous)

  2. #2
    I think he's later than Reneisanse (spell check must be off today). But GG did good work.
    I think your work looks good it just needs more lines. Think layering ( bunch of short lines) will give it depth.

    "sorry,Mel ....that's not the answer we were looking for".
    Last edited by Mel Fulks; 12-08-2018 at 9:17 PM. Reason: "Incorrect answer"

  3. #3
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    Tilman Reimenschneider is the artist (I was gave up getting a good image-pls forgive):

    TR Ultimate Hair.JPG
    David
    Confidence: That feeling you get before fully understanding a situation (Anonymous)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I think he's later than Reneisanse (spell check must be off today). But GG did good work.
    I think your work looks good it just needs more lines. Think layering ( bunch of short lines) will give it depth.

    "sorry,Mel ....that's not the answer we were looking for".
    Hey Mel, not clear what is layering?

    Scoop out lot of background and then make tufts of hair @ margins?
    David
    Confidence: That feeling you get before fully understanding a situation (Anonymous)

  5. #5
    David, I see it as just a row of short vertical lines under what you have now. Perhaps a couple of rows.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Berkshire County in Western Ma
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    I agree more lines and ksome layering. Depending on what it will have as far as finishing, a good wood burner would easily tackle the chore. You can cut pretty deep lines, very close together with a sharp woodburning pen

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Chewton, Victoria Australia
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    41
    Hi David
    The guys above were right Layering and Depth are what you want to give it that life like look.

    Look at each individual hair bunchs you have already carved in to show the flow and direction you desire.

    Now carve each one of those a little differently then the two hair bunches on either side of it. Start one going deep and disappearing under the neighboring bunch of hair say half way up.
    then do the next bunch by trying to create a gentle roller coaster look on that bunch. Then try the next one where it’s got flow to it but it goes over the top of the neighbouring hair bunches and so on....just keep mixing it up.

    You’ll find it coming to life before you know it.
    Last edited by Richard Yates; 12-10-2018 at 12:52 AM.

  8. #8
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    Wood burner=more tools...…..Excellent idea!

    Already have a really nice Weller, temperature control is on it, etc

    That will work for a burner?

    All great ideas. Perfect.

    Any more?

    As always, Thanks, David
    David
    Confidence: That feeling you get before fully understanding a situation (Anonymous)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Berkshire County in Western Ma
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    131
    The woodburner I have is a "detail master" sabre, with interchangeble pens. They aren't made anymore, but you can find them used. There are other brands like burnmaster from woodcarvers supply. They are pricey starting at around $180. The advantages of a pro woodburner is tip variety with either individual pens or pens with interchangeable tips. The pens are small in diameter for fine control. They heat up very rapidly (sabre to glowing red in seconds) and more importantly, if you are doing a lot of work, the recovery time is also very fast.

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