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Thread: Best lathe for budget of 6500

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Chandler View Post
    Since my G0766 was one of the first, myself and a couple of others helped get the “kinks” out of that new model. ...
    Do you know if Grizzly ever resolved the problem I heard some had with the headstock casting breaking? I never saw the outcome.

    Discussed here: https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....-do-what-to-do



    Maybe they just had some growing pains with some bad castings. The Grizzly does seem to have a large following of satisfied users.

    JKJ

  2. #32
    John, that damage is pure bad technique in trying to get a stuck chuck off. The metric spindle was about .0010” more than the aftermarket chucks sold in the USA. Grizzly chucks fit from the get go, but that information was not passed on by Grizzly, as I suppose their thinking was it matched with their chucks. I have seen a lot of tolerences all over the place on different chuck inserts....even from the same manufacturer. I had genuine teknatool inserts that had different measurements. I think they probably came from different runs at the manufacturer, as some were purchased 3 or 4 years later than others in my chuck collection.

    I remember one turner [Fred in WVa.] who broke the spindle housing on his G0698 18/47 back a few years ago, much like the G0766 you have pictured above. The G0766 is a very good lathe, but those metric machining specs did cause a few problems along the way for some who did not take the time to read up on postings from experienced users. As I mentioned earlier, Grizzly has changed most of those specs along with new orders of the G0766, as they had returns and figured out things....customer feedback can really give them an education!

    The G0800 is much beefier in the castingss, and has a totally different spindle lock design, and is a higher class of lathe, really comparable to the PM 4224b, but with ergonomic design elements the PM does not have. The banjo is beefier than the banjo on the Powermatic or the Robust American Beauty, tailstock is heavy, and everthing locks down absolutely rock solid. A really fine lathe.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Chandler View Post
    ... A really fine lathe.
    I'd like to try turning on one. Maybe I'll come visit!

    JKJ

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reed Gray View Post
    The Oneway is a good lathe, but for bowl turning, I would use the outboard set up rather than over the long bed. Just more ergonomically efficient as you don't have to bend over or reach way out away from your body.

    robo hippy
    Reed, have you ever tried running the lathe in reverse and putting your cutting edge on the far side of the lathe? I've done this with good success as the tool handle is on the close side of the lathe and you don't have to reach over the ways to turn bowls. The Oneway has the capability of a full range variable speed while in reverse - not sure if other lathes can do this.

    Anyone else tried this?

    Back to the original question - I'm not sure of the cost of the lathe, but the VB36 Bowlmaster has always intrigued me. I went with the Oneway 2436 since the VB36 is a dedicated bowl lathe and I wanted to be able to turn spindles. I might be inclined to change my mind at this point though - I'm about 2% spindles and 98% bowls and vessels. That said, I've been really happy with my Oneway. It is about 8 years old now and still runs like new.

    Jon Mac
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon McElwain View Post
    Reed, have you ever tried running the lathe in reverse and putting your cutting edge on the far side of the lathe? ...Anyone else tried this?
    I do this, not only for the inside of bowls but for a variety of things. I was turning a tiny inverted platter-shaped finger top yesterday and could see a lot better when in reverse, especially when precision detailing. Most of the lathes today will spin the same in reverse - I mostly use a PM3520b but I've done the same thing on my Jet 1642. For a large, heavy blank it is best to lock the chuck to the lathe spindle.

    JKJ

  6. #36
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    Just a question that's kind of off topic but would turning not in reverse but standing on the other side of the lathe accomplish the same thing as turning in reverse? I've done this when working on the inside of some bowls. Turning in reverse would mean using a set screw to keep the chuck from unscrewing. I'm sure that people with lots of experience don't worry about catches but I'm not there yet. Just trying to learn if there's any advantage to turning in reverse.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    Just a question that's kind of off topic but would turning not in reverse but standing on the other side of the lathe accomplish the same thing as turning in reverse? I've done this when working on the inside of some bowls. Turning in reverse would mean using a set screw to keep the chuck from unscrewing. I'm sure that people with lots of experience don't worry about catches but I'm not there yet. Just trying to learn if there's any advantage to turning in reverse.
    Good point but I think you would want to turn with the opposite hand.

  8. #38
    Actually, I turn from the back side of the lathe often and use the same dominant right hand as I do in the normal position. I don't turn in reverse, but I think that is when it might be more convenient to turn "left handed" - left hand on the handle.

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  9. #39
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    I have a G0766 (an early one) and I talked Griz into giving me the shorter legs. They are close to 2" shorter. I'm 5'10" so the shorter legs work better for me. But, now, all of the 0766 lathes come with the shorter legs.

    I had some early issues with the lathe. At the time, there was a lot of activity about the lathe on the GGMG sub-group. Now, there is very seldom activity. So, my "read" is that the initial "kinks" have been largely ironed out.

    But if I had $6500 of someone else's money, I would probably buy something higher end. Perhaps the G0800 or a PM. But if I only had $2K to spend, I'd probably buy another Grizzly.

    I remember seeing the picture of the broken headstock casting. I never heard how that came out. Perhaps it was a flaw in the casting or perhaps the fellow just used too much force. I use a poly spacer and haven't had any issues of a chuck getting frozen.

  10. #40
    Where was I???? As for outboard turning, when I got my PM, my lathe sat in a corner, and turning outboard was not an option, which is why the sliding headstock works so well for me. Dale Larson roughs out all of his bowls on the inboard of his big Oneway, and finish turns on the outboard end. I know there are variations, with some being reverse threaded so things don't unwind, and using locking chucks, and getting used to turning with the lathe spinning the other direction. All work, but I have gotten used to the sliding headstock....

    robo hippy

  11. #41
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    Of those who do turn in forward spindle rotation and stand at the rear of the lathe, have you installed a remote shutoff?

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    Of those who do turn in forward spindle rotation and stand at the rear of the lathe, have you installed a remote shutoff?
    This was one of the reasons I started looking at the Laguna Revo 24-36 with the remote rear unit that is affixed to either the right front of the lathe on the top of the legs, or attached to the rear of the tailstock arm. Or, as I have now done, attached it to a stand alone mount for when I am standing at the end of the lathe doing a bowl or platter.

    For years I had been using my Noval 1624-44 lathe with the swivel head for larger items, which was great, but to turn the lathe on or off, one needed to step behind the work to access the switch. I was at the stage of adding an emergency cut-off switch when I decided I wished to upgrade, whereupon the Laguna 24-36 became the frontrunner and what I eventually purchased. The added remote switch housing, was what tipped my decision towards the 24-36 over the 18-36.

    At my turning club, all of our lathes have been fitted with an emergency cut-off switch at the end of each lathe. This allows anyone at the tailstock end to just hit the button to kill everything; quite a good feature in a busy environment.

    Mick.

  13. #43
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    I'm curious if anyone has looked into getting the Harvey T60 directly from China rather that getting the G0800 from Grizzly, basically the same lathe? What are the shipping charges etc.? Would there be any savings if any when done? The only downside I see would be after sales parts/service.

    https://www.alibaba.com/product-deta...588b6a25IGP7VC

    https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...od-Lathe/G0800

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Christensen View Post
    I'm curious if anyone has looked into getting the Harvey T60 directly from China rather that getting the G0800 from Grizzly, basically the same lathe? What are the shipping charges etc.? Would there be any savings if any when done? The only downside I see would be after sales parts/service.

    https://www.alibaba.com/product-deta...588b6a25IGP7VC

    https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...od-Lathe/G0800
    It may be completely different in Canada but here is the tale of one direct from China buyer of a woodworking machine:

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ighlight=china

    In the US we currently have a 25% tariff on woodworking machines. There are a lot of people that buy laser engravers direct so there is likely a lot of info in that sub-forum. For me personally, the process seemed far too involved and expensive compared to the money saved.
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  15. #45
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    "Your bandsaw weighs more when you leave the spring compressed instead of relieving the tension"



    Brandolini's law definitely applies to the politics of today....
    Last edited by Glenn C Roberts; 12-20-2018 at 10:33 AM.

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