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Thread: Power Feeder Mounting on a Shaper.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Griswold Connecticut
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    5,986

    Power Feeder Mounting on a Shaper.

    A few months back there was a thread on shapers, I can't find it now, and during the course of the thread there was a good discussion on the use, and non use, of a power feeder, which got me to thinking I should look into getting one.
    I have been around wood working machines, and shapers, since I was 12 or 13 years old and had never used a power feeder before.The type of projects I have done just didn't lend themselves to it's use with a power feeder, but I did listen, or read as it may be, the folks that were firmly in support of the use of the power feeder with a shaper, so I actively started looking for one on Craigslist for a cabinet project i now have to do. I found one this past weekend.
    I found a 1/2HP, 3 wheeled ,Comatic AF-308, from 2004, that had been in storage for a few years. It's actually in really good shape,and works well. Now I need to mount it to my Delta 43-375 shaper.
    The bolt pattern of the base mount of this power feeder is different than the holes drilled in the top of my shaper, so I need to drill mounting holes. The bolt pattern is 3-1/2" x 4-1/4", and uses 1/2" bolts.
    Is it better to mount the feeder in the back left, or right of the shaper? It seems as if the back left will be easier, as the motor pulleys might be in the way on the right to get in there and bolt it in place once the holes are drilled.
    I'm also open to a solution that doesn't involve drilling holes. I can drill the holes easy enough, but if there is an alternative to drilling, I'd like to investigate it.

    Any tips and tricks, or just good info, with respect to the use of the power feeder are appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
    Mike
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  2. #2
    I like it on your left back corner. That way you can make a tall long fence that can be clamped diagonally and run tall
    material. Only height limit is the roof.

  3. #3
    If your shaper is reversible the corner really doesnt matter. We are on the rear left but table is tapped for either. I'd advise you to make sure whatever you drill and tap is in solid material. Many shapers now have webbed bottoms.and only have full thickness material in bosses in the castings for given tap locations. May not be something to worry about but a peek under the table will tell.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Grassy Lake Alberta
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    612
    Mike ,I bolted my power feeder to a junk tablesaw extension after drilling it for the feeder mount. My shaper is a smaller one and my feeder is a one horse so a bit big for my machine,it works well. My shaper table was drilled and tapped for an extension on the back. Mike.

  5. #5
    have both sides same time, wheels one and track the other. I sometimes think on the left is safer if it ever moves, more chance it will go away from the cutter. Havent sort that out, say it were to swivel on the base. I dont trust them anymore as i had a europa that moved. Ill put a wood block in so its a second back up to clamping. I just drill the tops sometimes tapping the top and sometimes oversize with nuts on the bottom or do both

  6. #6
    To Right no exception I like the damn thing where I’m standing
    jack
    English machines

  7. #7
    Always put them back left. Drill and tap, unless I am in a hurry and the tables are thick (never had one that wasn't thick)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    350
    mine are all mounted on the back right

  9. #9
    I think mine are all back left. No real reason either.

  10. #10
    You might want to look into this...

    Grizzly G4175 - Quick Holder
    http://www.grizzly.com/products/Griz...k-Holder/G4175

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    5,986
    Thanks folks.
    Seems as if either left ,or right, have no significant drawbacks. I'll probably try left first, only because I would want to remove the motor and pulley to mount it to the right.

    Kevin Beitz
    I saw those, but I can't find much info other than the Grizzly Catalog on them. I might call them to ask about the spacing of the pre-drilled holes, I may also just buy a scrap of steel plate and make one. That way I could try either left or right.

    Mike Kees
    Well, that's a solution. I have three spare CI extension wings that I never use.

    Mark Bolton
    Yep, it's reversible.
    I've looked at the thickness of the table and I wouldn't be comfortable with tapped holes. I don't think there is sufficient table top thickness for the thread engagement of a 1/2" bolt. It would be through bolted.
    As an aside, it was actually your posts, and Martin Wassner's, in that thread a few months back, that convinced me to find a feeder and begin to use it.
    Interestingly enough, the person I bought it from had lost the tips of his right index and middle finger to a panel raising cutter. It did make me realize that I wasn't wasting $$$$ buying it.

    Thank you for the feedback folks. Now to order new wheels/tires for it. I think it may have been setting on the wheels in storage for a a few years, there is a noticeable ""hop" at one point in the feed.
    Last edited by Mike Cutler; 12-07-2018 at 5:54 PM.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Michigan
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    4,564
    Center between the two spindles, your results may vary.

    One thing I have done wrong before is put it too far back. Think of the feeder in the vertical position and running thick stock and set it so it can do that. Also, the least amount of arm you are running on the less flex you will have, and the easier it will be to crank it up from the front of the machine.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Kamiah, ID
    Posts
    187
    Mike, like you I didn't have any experience with a power feeder. At first I hated it but thanks to advice from the folks on this forum I got new wheels from Western Roller (the purple ones, as advised by them because they grip better on the smooth materials I run most). That was a game changer and now I wouldn't be without a power feed. I'm sure you'll love it!

    My shaper was drilled for either corner. I started off on the back right (the feed side for me) and ended up on the back left (the exit side for me). I prefer the back left. The only difference for me was my work flow and orientation of other machines nearby favor the back left mounting. YMMV.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    654
    I have had them mounted both left and right. All right side now because of side mount sliders and feeders on the post arm.
    if I remember correctly left mounted is easier to flip a conventional feeder for feeding vertically against the fence.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Griswold Connecticut
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    Larry
    i don't think I can center it. My shaper has a single spindle and the dust collection goes straight out the back. I hear you about the length of the arm, and to keep it to a minimum to preclude to much flex. It looks like it will be at max, 14" column center, to feeder inboard wheel once mounted.

    Tim
    I have an email into Western Roller to get replacement wheels.
    I don't think I'll "hate" the power feeder, at least I hope not. I've "G" clamped it to the shaper to get a feel for it, so from here it's just a matter of fine tuning it. I'm sure I'll still do feeding by hand for the "one off" curved stuff.

    Joe
    I don't know about flipping it on it's side to feed vertically. That's probably more advanced than I'll ever need. It does sound interesting for re-sawing on a bandsaw, but i'm a long way from that I think.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

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