Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 25 of 25

Thread: If You Haven't Noticed

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Kory Cassel View Post
    Attachment 398158
    Hey Ken,

    I have always been excited about the possibilities when I look at this book I have. This one's mounted on a straight leg, but I don't think you really need to mortise for the parallel guide to get it to work well? If you have this angle going on, the parallel guide is excused from stresses due to clamping to the side of the screw. I'm rooting for you to do an experiment at some point.
    Kory,

    Just another observation, If that illustration is the author's understanding of how a leg vise works I would dismiss anything he/she said. With the screw placed as illustrated the vise would have little clamping power if it were vertical or angled.

    ken

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by ken hatch View Post
    Kory,

    Just another observation, If that illustration is the author's understanding of how a leg vise works I would dismiss anything he/she said. With the screw placed as illustrated the vise would have little clamping power if it were vertical or angled.

    ken
    Ken,

    Could you please explain why? I see that it will have little capacity but clamping force should be tremendous since shoulder ratio is so significant.


    BTW, it just struck me that any kind of parallel guide limits chop movement not only on the vertical axis but also right-to-left. Thanks Ken! Like with peg board side of the rail mortise and sides of the pin/peg will limit side-to-side racking while clamping vertical board. With criss-cross there are axles... So I finally realized why racking is not a big deal for clamping vertical boards.

    Gonna try sloped one anyway, I just fascinated with mechanics of clamping with angled vise.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Coffee City, Texas
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by ken hatch View Post
    Kory,

    Just another observation, If that illustration is the author's understanding of how a leg vise works I would dismiss anything he/she said. With the screw placed as illustrated the vise would have little clamping power if it were vertical or angled.

    ken
    I'm pretty sure that is just one of his hand drawn doodles. There are a lot of photos of actual leg vises in the book. It's much more of a historical bench tour than Chris Schwarz's books. The Workbench Book by Scott Landis, Taunton Press 1987. Picked it up at a local library book sale a few years back. Has good drawings of Frank Klaus's bench.
    Dojo Kun, 1: Be humble and polite.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Alexander Zagubny View Post
    Ken,

    Could you please explain why? I see that it will have little capacity but clamping force should be tremendous since shoulder ratio is so significant.


    BTW, it just struck me that any kind of parallel guide limits chop movement not only on the vertical axis but also right-to-left. Thanks Ken! Like with peg board side of the rail mortise and sides of the pin/peg will limit side-to-side racking while clamping vertical board. With criss-cross there are axles... So I finally realized why racking is not a big deal for clamping vertical boards.

    Gonna try sloped one anyway, I just fascinated with mechanics of clamping with angled vise.
    Alexander,

    I believe it was Archimedes that said something to the order of give me a place to stand and a lever and I can move the world. With the screw at the clamping surface there is little lever.

    ken

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Kory Cassel View Post
    I'm pretty sure that is just one of his hand drawn doodles. There are a lot of photos of actual leg vises in the book. It's much more of a historical bench tour than Chris Schwarz's books. The Workbench Book by Scott Landis, Taunton Press 1987. Picked it up at a local library book sale a few years back. Has good drawings of Frank Klaus's bench.
    Kory,

    Sounds possible. I must admit I haven't read the book nor am I familiar with Scott Landis although IIRC I've seen it on the woodstore's bookshelf.

    ken

  6. #21
    Having just read Chris Schwarz's discussion of the leg vice on a Roubo bench in the Roubo book, it seems even the parallel guide isn't a must have, especially if you make the chop for the leg vise longer.

    Eric

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Rathhaus View Post
    Having just read Chris Schwarz's discussion of the leg vice on a Roubo bench in the Roubo book, it seems even the parallel guide isn't a must have, especially if you make the chop for the leg vise longer.

    Eric
    Eric,

    I'd have to read what he is saying. It could be, I'd hate to go against C.S. with reference to the historical record unless I was sure of my facts. But I have a hard time figuring out how it would work.

    ken

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Borger, Texas
    Posts
    1,070
    Ken,

    I would never have guessed that you were a fan of the Moravian design, well....I wouldn't have if you hadn't mentioned it so often (just kidding.)

    However, I have very much appreciated the posts on it, and also your evaluation of the Moravian vs Roubo. My first bench will be fairly light duty. However it will be my only real bench until I build my first heavy duty bench, and that will almost certainly be a Moravian. The light duty bench will primarily use lumber I already have, a vise I already have (it was my dad's vise), and so the price will be right, and it will be my main and only real bench for a while. It will be eventually used for a mobile vise for primarily finish carpentry and as an assembly table.

    That said, the first heavy duty bench will almost certainly be a Moravian, and will also take over as a travel bench for more heavy duty carpentry. It will be about the size of the one you first built to travel with you, about 6' long so it can travel in the back of a short bed truck, or inside our van or my Jimmy.

    At any rate, thank you very much for the interesting and very informative posts on building the bench, and your comments on the plus/minus points of the bench versus the Roubo were very instructive. Those comments were the last nail in making me think the Moravian is the way to go for the first (and maybe final if it will do everything I need) heavy duty bench.

    Thanks and regards,

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 12-06-2018 at 11:42 PM.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Stew Denton View Post
    Ken,

    I would never have guessed that you were a fan of the Moravian design, well....I wouldn't have if you hadn't mentioned it so often (just kidding.)

    However, I have very much appreciated the posts on it, and also your evaluation of the Moravian vs Roubo. My first bench will be fairly light duty. However it will be my only real bench until I build my first heavy duty bench, and that will almost certainly be a Moravian. The light duty bench will primarily use lumber I already have, a vise I already have (it was my dad's vise), and so the price will be right, and it will be my main and only real bench for a while. It will be eventually used for a mobile vise for primarily finish carpentry and as an assembly table.

    That said, the first heavy duty bench will almost certainly be a Moravian, and will also take over as a travel bench for more heavy duty carpentry. It will be about the size of the one you first built to travel with you, about 6' long so it can travel in the back of a short bed truck, or inside our van or my Jimmy.

    At any rate, thank you very much for the interesting and very informative posts on building the bench, and your comments on the plus/minus points of the bench versus the Roubo were very instructive. Those comments were the last nail in making me think the Moravian is the way to go for the first (and maybe final if it will do everything I need) heavy duty bench.

    Thanks and regards,

    Stew
    Stew,

    As I have posted, before deciding to build a large version of the bench I worked on the small portable version alongside the big French/English bench. I found for most tasks I enjoyed working on the small bench more that the large one. The only tasks it fell short were sawing across the bench and I think a good part of that was because I made the bench narrow to fit into the side bins of the motorhome. A wider version of the small bench or a sand bag would likely cure that shortcoming.

    Good luck when you decide to build,

    ken

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Borger, Texas
    Posts
    1,070
    Ken,

    Your comment on the width is duly noted. For moving around stuff for carpentry you want things reasonable to move around even if you want it reasonably stout if possible, but, I am not a real big guy and not nearly as young as I used to be so.....it's always a compromise on size, and strength and weight, versus portability.

    On the other hand I want the bench to be as generally useful as possible, so I may make the first Moravian up to 2' wide, maybe a bit less, I will have to figure up what it will weigh. Part of the time you just need a set up to clamp a miter box to for carpentry. Moving around planks and multiple sawhorses is a pain, and the flexibility of that kind of set up is limited without lots of cobbling up stuff to hold things....but come to think of it, that is what I still do for almost any project I work on.

    Stew

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •