Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 66

Thread: What tasks intimidate you

  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Northeast PA
    Posts
    498
    I've never made a chair before, and a close friend gave me one of his set of 4 dining chairs and asked me to make him 2 more to match it. The legs, back, and stretchers are all decorative spindles with a ton of beads and ogees, so it is a daunting task indeed. And I'm a novice turner at best. Gulp.

    I'm really looking forward to getting some time to start the project though. I enjoy a new challenge!
    ---Trudging the Road of Happy Destiny---

  2. #17
    get a skew chisel, Brian. It's a revelation. It's scary to learn to use, but when you get the touch (I'll tell you when I get it consistently) it is probably the best feeling I've ever had on the lathe.

  3. #18
    Teaching my husband wood working. I love him to death but it's better for the entire world if he never holds a chisel again :P

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,131
    A big job that teaches me nothing is not likely to get started in my shop.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sierra Nevada Mtns (5K feet)
    Posts
    247
    When I was at woodworking school the students were told that a glue up automatically lowers your IQ by 20 points. Well I don't have a problem with that because my wife is ALWAYS in the shop with me when I start a glue up. She keeps me on track. However I do have a continuous problem with cross or rip sawing a board (no problem with joinery sawing). I can saw to a line but my cut is almost never perpendicular. Leans to the left, leans to the right, whatever, but almost never perpendicular. I blame it on coriolis forces.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica de Boer View Post
    Teaching my husband wood working. I love him to death but it's better for the entire world if he never holds a chisel again :P
    Your husband is not in the minority there are many of us out here.
    Jim

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Northeast PA
    Posts
    498
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    get a skew chisel, Brian. It's a revelation. It's scary to learn to use, but when you get the touch (I'll tell you when I get it consistently) it is probably the best feeling I've ever had on the lathe.
    Thanks Prashun, I'll keep working at it. I have a 1" skew that came with an old (1950's?) set of Crafstman chisels I picked up on CL years ago. I've practiced with it but can't quite seem to get the hang of it. One second I'm peeling off the fluffiest of shavings and leaving behind a surface to die for, the next second I've cut an 1/8" deep spiral gouge from one end of the spindle to the other and nearly pooped myself from the shock LOL! I don't scare too easily but man, that skew brings a pucker factor all its own.

    I just ordered a set of beading tools and a diamond tool from Dway. With those and a few spindle gouges I should be good to go. If I have to master the skew before i make these dining chairs, my buddy will grow old waiting for them.
    ---Trudging the Road of Happy Destiny---

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    20,867
    Blog Entries
    1
    One thing that intimidates me is cutting big lap joints on 2X lumber:

    Sawing a Lap Joint.jpg

    None of my back saws was doing much on the rip cutting. Used a D-8 at 6ppi.

    The crosscut was done with a 28" backsaw with ~10ppi.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #24
    Brushing on finishes. I hate it. Runs. Bubbles. Brush strokes.
    I switched to shellac and at least there are no bubbles or brush strokes, plus a run is easy to repair.
    But I still dread it.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Northeast PA
    Posts
    498
    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Brushing on finishes. I hate it. Runs. Bubbles. Brush strokes.
    I switched to shellac and at least there are no bubbles or brush strokes, plus a run is easy to repair.
    But I still dread it.
    I'm with you on this one, Fred. I never brush finish on anymore, I'll either make a wiping varnish out of it or spray it. Too hard to get the surface I want when brushing.
    ---Trudging the Road of Happy Destiny---

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Libertyville, IL (Chicago - North)
    Posts
    352

    Rough Stock

    Selecting, paying for, laying out parts and making the initial, rough cuts are all nervous moments.

    The actual work of building furniture is fun - even repairing mistakes.
    But getting the right material and not making irreversible mistakes in roughing out parts is intimidating.
    I really enjoy making those rough cuts with the big hand saws, but a goof at this stage could mean another trip to the lumber store - which may not yield a good match, etc..

    Still, the importance of this question is about the pleasure that we get when we overcome the intimidation.

    Hand me some chalk and my 5.5" TPI ripper. Bombs away.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,564
    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Brushing on finishes. I hate it. Runs. Bubbles. Brush strokes.
    I switched to shellac and at least there are no bubbles or brush strokes, plus a run is easy to repair.
    But I still dread it.
    i very happy with the finish I get brushing. I am often asked if I sprayed the finish. It is a learned process. I'm sure others do things differently. Here are my suggestion.
    1 use good brushes fitted to the material. I like Purdy nylons for water based and my old Liebco Best China's for oil.
    2 temperature of the surface and the product is important
    3 learn your product and how to thin it if needed
    4 stir it until your tired of doing it, with a paddle not a powered mixer or shaker. If you have it shaken at the store give it a day to settle down.
    5 fill the brush. Dip it at least half way. Do not slap it on the side of the container or drag it across the edge. Push the brush against the side of your container and give it a gentle flex.
    6 put a good wet even coat and keep a wet edge.
    7 have enough light where you can look across the surface. It should look like one piece.
    8 work horizontal if you can. If you can't try to keep the coat even. Runs start wher there is a break in the coat.
    9 if your using fast drying product dry air and a breeze is your enemy. It will dry the top surface to fast and leave brush marks.
    10 I don't like foam brushes I think they cause air bubbles. I don't care much for wiping anything but stain work. Long gentle strokes eithe the tip of a good brush.
    I hope this helps some.
    Jim

  13. Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Skelly View Post
    Brushing on finishes. I hate it. Runs. Bubbles. Brush strokes.
    Use a bit of thinner or mineral spirits to dilute the varnish, this makes it flow better. The quality of the brush and the room temperature are also important.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    DuBois, PA
    Posts
    1,737
    As a hobbyist, what intimidates me more than anything? A deadline!
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  15. #30
    Jim, Jessica,
    Thank you for the tips! I'll try them soon.
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •